Mixed Martial Arts Sparring

Aiki Lee

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its like ras, but without the skill.......

Deja vu...

to address the striking to the thigh and arm. If you strike at kyusho (pressure points), you can cause significant damage by attacking nerve clusters and major blood vessles, hitting someone hard enough in these areas could end a fight, or it could just piss them off which is why you NEVER assume that one strike is all you need.
 
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Zenjael

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AMAZING how all of us who spar full contact 5 and 6 times a week are still alive...we must all suck...

No, but if injured, you are also not liable for the complete dissolution of the club you train at, meaning all the members would lose access with the club as well, for the university to avoid a lawsuit. NVCC is very non-compliant about us sparring, we do what we can, when we can, when we have the supervision nearby. But even then, it is done without contact... for once again, fear of lawsuit. Wearing pads would actually give the university cause to ban us, as opposed to this video which can be argued as Wushu form (though in an MA community I wouldn't, it just justifies us being able to practice.)

As money is an issue being a student, the only place I can train is for free NVCC, and occasionally at GMU, also for free, though it is with the odd, passing practitioner in the campus' lonely MA room. This isn't justification, it's just me pointing out that if I don't want to get thrown in jail for brawling in public, there are specific channels I have to take, which leave it difficult to demonstrate the contact desired.

Next time you go heavy contact outside your school, without pads, let me know how it goes. I've had crowds form, and police approach, even when we've cleared it ahead of time and used a free speech zone as reason for freedom of expression. At the end of the day, you might be able to do wushu form, or point spar, or even spar, but you will not get to use truly heavy contact in a public place, even indoors, without risk of disturbing the peace. That just seems kind of duh.



Ok, now that I got that out of the way....please enlighten us, as to how this is possible. The inner thigh? Been hit there and on the outter thigh, and I'm still alive. Been hit on the arm too, and I'm still here, typing this reply. Hmm...the side of the neck....watch the UFC, and you'll see quite a few KO's from a neck hit. However, given the nature of the strikes shown in that clip, I doubt anyone would get hurt, let alone killed.

When people do not intend to hurt each other, why would they appear to look as if they do? To me it appears sadder that the standard in the art is to hit hard, than to not at all. I love the machoness, but I do not like the disregard and potential for injury it can cause. Considering our club could be dissolved over a minor contusion, we have to take great caution in how we operate.

I do wish I could find some footage from Khan's, it would emphasize much better the background Alec and I have from a school which trained to hit very, very hard.

I have offered philosophically, politically, and mechanically why we are lacking contact. Sometimes you are given a situation where you are not able to execute your techniques. Perhaps it should be highlighted more, that it is better to be judged by twelve than carried by 6. I have found, at NVCC, that advise is good. We practice fighting, sparring when we can, but it is almost always offsite when we do so.

And we do not practice continuous, which is angering. We practice mainly 5 on 5, as a guised way to spar. If we are disingenuous at all, it is pretending certain drills are what we call them, and not the sparring sessions they actually are. But even these are light contact. Say we did go heavy, and someone broke a rib as I did from the contact during my 1st dan exam, to preserve the club we would not even be able to report the location of the injury, for risk of the club being removed. I wonder, if in part, this kind of policy is also what keeps George Mason from developing a club. I've seen even high schools with MA clubs, but I find a good university does not even have rudimentary elements of one outside of the Kendo club.

I have fought in the past, with heavy contact. the place, and time however, are very clear that we cannot do that without hurting others training, let alone our own.

to address the striking to the thigh and arm. If you strike at kyusho (pressure points), you can cause significant damage by attacking nerve clusters and major blood vessles, hitting someone hard enough in these areas could end a fight, or it could just piss them off which is why you NEVER assume that one strike is all you need.

You can cause quite a few things to do. If it requires more than one attempt to execute a joint-lock, or stun using arterial jabs, chances are you shouldn't try executing the technique at all, out of risk of doing exactly what you said... pissing them off.
 

ETinCYQX

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99% of the time we do full contact without pads. I teach at an actual school, with actual students and actual insurance.
 

elder999

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Alex- I wasn't at all sure if I was going to reply to any of your threads? I mean. which one? You've been all over this forum, showing -well, showing how little you know, frankly.

I'm going to try not to comment on the video in this thread-I've seen a people who are more than capable and knowledgeable look pretty bad on video, so I try not to make judgments about it. It comes from seeing myself on video for the first time, when I was about 17 years old, and a relatively new shodan in kyokushin karate and tae kwon do. Cross training wasn't altogether unheard of in 1977, and neither was cross ranking, but it was rare enough for me to think I was pretty hot ****. I wasn't-at least that's how I felt when I saw myself on video for the first time. It was a bout that I'd won, though-but I sure thought I looked like crap. :lfao:

Lesson one? Video is a great learning tool, that can be used to review and critique your performance. Lesson two?

If you can't handle criticism, don't post video.

Now, on to your language.

Zenjael said:
Despite the title, while there is MMA utilized in the video, there are also different kinds of mixed martial arts, rather than the normative sole TKD/Muai-Thai/Judo combination.


You read a lot of Ken WIlber, there Alex? I mean, seriously, why say something with a few 0.10 cent words, when a few more 0.50 cent ones will do? Honestly, "the normative sole TKD/Muay-Thai/Judo combination?" WTF does that even mean? :lfao:

And I ask this not as an uneducated person, or someone unaccustomed to the written word, but as someone who had his first college degree at age 16, who has gone on to earning graduate degrees in engineering and a doctorate in physics, and who regularly has written reports on complex subject matter for people who don't have nearly the same technical background.

First lesson? Keep it simple-language especially.I'm only sure of what I think you think meant after reading it over for two days, and I'm still not so sure that you know what you meant.

Second lesson? If you can't explain it simply enough for your mother to understand it, you probably don't understand it either. That's not me-that's something that an colleague and I use on a regular basis, but we borrowed from Albert Einstein-the only thing is that I usually say it this way: If you can't explain it simply enough for your mother to understand it, you probably don't understand it either, and you should keep your goddam mouth shut. :lol

Zenjael said:
The person in the black is my good training partner, and friend, Alec Emery. I've had the honor of attending several martial art schools with him, and he is a very good fighter. He holds a 3rd Dan in Chung Do Kwan TKD, and I am equally ranked in WTF Tae Kwon Do, Moo Duk Kwan.

Meh. That tae kwon do I mentioned in my past? Duk Sung Son's World Tae Kwon Do Association, Chung Do Kwan. I haven't been formally involved with tae kwon do since 1980 or so-had to make a choice, and I chose kyokushin. Got to yi dan and said good bye. All I can really say-and here I'm basing my comments on that video, so keep my general comment on video in general, and take it for what it's worth-is that standards might have dropped a bit for those arts in the last 30 years. Of course, there's a group in Los Alamos affiliated with that same organization I belonged to, and I'm friends with a number of people involved-I've trained with them and watched their classes, and-even in a "sandals and socks college professor, I like Ike, Pleasantvillish" sort of town like Los Alamos, the dan level students and teachers show far more form, good posture, and power- in that video. Of course, it's a video-reference my comment on video ealier in this post, and move on.

In fact, I'm going to make some comments based on the content of all your other posts, rather than the video,

"do I hit too hard, or am I just too experienced? " REALLY?? You help run a college martial arts club-basically, the kind of thing where a bunch of people who trained at home when they were in high school, in a "diverse bunch of styles" get together and train together, and you call yourself a "head instructor," who hits too hard, and no one wants to play with?

Maybe you're just a wild and out of control little **** whose ego gets a stroke out of demonstrating his misperception of superiority, and people don't want to play with you because they don't want to get hurt?

"Capable of killing with a single strike" TO THE THIGH?

:lfao:

"...three muggings"

I was mugged three times by the time I was 21-once in Greece, once in Spain, and once in Brooklyn.

Every time was my fault. I may have successfully defended myself, but the mugging itself was a failure on my part, and perhaps a failure in my training. There is no other way to look at using martial skills "in the real world."

Frankly,I don't think you've been training 20 years-or even 10, really. If you have, you've been wasting your time. In fact, I'd say that you're not even suffering from "delusions of grandeur," you're suffering from delusions of competence.

If this seems harsh, well, like I said, I was trying hard not to comment at all, or at least do it in a more constructive way. I don't expect you to take any of this to heart, or pay much attention-when I was 22, I wouldn't have either-I thought I was hot ****, just like you do, and I was only ni dan. Both of my kids might have paid attention when they were your age, but I'm not just their dad, I'm their teacher. I'd expect that, given this:

Zenjael said:
, find valuable insights for possible improvement and critique,

you might take what I'm now going to say to heart, but I bet you won't.

I've earned mutliple grades in multiple martial arts-I started training formally when I was 11, actually on my 11th birthday, so I'll have been training 41 years this June-not just longer than you've been alive, but neary twice as long-I trained in Japan, fought in knockdown tournaments, and I've trained all kinds of people that I'm not even going to get into here. In spite of that, I usually consider myself fairly mediocre as a martial artist. Likewise, those multiple degrees I've earned-whatever honors and work I've done, I've never considered myself much more than merely competent. A little bit of humility serves a person well-take this for what it's worth, from someone with an outsize ego himself-I'd have gone a lot further in life if I hadn't wasted so much time thinking about how great I was....

There are people like me on this board, people who have trained for decades before you were born. There are others who have spent decades living in places like Japan and China, just so they could train for decades. You'd do well to listen to what all of them are trying to say-some gently, and some maybe not so gently-and just keep training.
 
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Zenjael

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Meh. That tae kwon do I mentioned in my past? Duk Sung Son's World Tae Kwon Do Association, Chung Do Kwan. I haven't been formally involved with tae kwon do since 1980 or so-had to make a choice, and I chose kyokushin. Got to yi dan and said good bye. All I can really say-and here I'm basing my comments on that video, so keep my general comment on video in general, and take it for what it's worth-is that standards might have dropped a bit for those arts in the last 30 years. Of course, there's a group in Los Alamos affiliated with that same organization I belonged to, and I'm friends with a number of people involved-I've trained with them and watched their classes, and-even in a "sandals and socks college professor, I like Ike, Pleasantvillish" sort of town like Los Alamos, the dan level students and teachers show far more form, good posture, and power- in that video. Of course, it's a video-reference my comment on video ealier in this post, and move on.

I could never imagine leaving a style behind, and no longer training or practicing in it, unless necessary for me to unadopt habits, to integrate the new techniques. That was, partly, why I gave up Moo duk Kwan for 5 years, to learn other styles of TKD.

In spite of that, I usually consider myself fairly mediocre as a martial artist. Likewise, those multiple degrees I've earned-whatever honors and work I've done, I've never considered myself much more than merely competent.

I like this standard. I hope you don't mind if I adopt it for myself to meet one day.

I don't think you've been training 20 years-or even 10, really. If you have, you've been wasting your time. In fact, I'd say that you're not even suffering from "delusions of grandeur," you're suffering from delusions of competence.

Having successfully survived two muggings, I think we will only know the answer to this if I emerge from after joining the military still alive. I join expecting not to survive, so that when I do join, I'll train harder and hopefully raise those odds when the time approaches.

Maybe you're just a wild and out of control little **** whose ego gets a stroke out of demonstrating his misperception of superiority, and people don't want to play with you because they don't want to get hurt?

Which is it? I hit too hard... or I don't hit hard enough? I seem to get one of either in this forum, now. I posted this video in part because of the perception that I struck way too hard, recklessly, to give example that I'm not out of control. There is a lot of control in that video, And when we do hit, we make sure we're alright also.

But ah, Alec does hit, among the many people I train with. There are a few who do not, but the others push them to grow. People do not want to play with me in the sense they do not desire to play with Christian, who taught the Taijiquan program at our university for a time. Just as people may not desire to play with you; that does not mean you are doing anything wrong however. I asked the club, as per the advice, and I was informed that I do not, it is just hard to get a feel for winning. That is where the mindframe of the club is at, in continuous sparring, there is still something to 'win' as opposed to survive.

Thank you for your time. I recall seeing a video where I was displeased with how I looked. There are parts where I am here, but I would not post what I was not at least satisfied with, which I can say I am here. After 19 years of training, and being the youth I am... I don't feel the need to be like Chuck Norris or Bruce Lee. Chuck Ree? I am satisfied with the plateau I have hit, but it is time now to to reach higher.

"Capable of killing with a single strike" TO THE THIGH?

I can think of at least 4 artists I have met who I am certain could do so using pressure points and arterial striking. The taijiquan practioner I have mentioned before could easily puncture cans with his jabs, and I've seen him chip bricks as well. It's why I started conditioning jab techniques as well, I was so impressed. I am certain Master Murray can do it, using acujutsu. I've seen him put people down in ways that are eyebrow raising. And so the list goes on, but I have witnessed people who understood the theory multiple times, and demonstrated the capability, but I suppose till I ever get to see it seen or demonstrated I will have to go off what I have been shown, and how to execute it.

I have heard of certain ninjutsu masters who have never in their entire martial career gotten to use the full force of the techniques they learned, for fear of killing. I am not saying we are that level, but I am saying we avoid injury to that degree, because of the possibility of legal concerns.

99% of the time we do full contact without pads. I teach at an actual school, with actual students and actual insurance.

Which is awesome, and I have read before. You're also 19, and about to move shop, if I recall. When instructing for kaizen, we have the insurance, and liability conditions in place because of the same reasons you do. However, the NVCC club is not even officially embraced by the University yet, despite offering Martial Arts courses through the university. It has been a long-standing issue between the club, and the school for over 3 years. Membership is not an issue, compliance of the university has been.

We are lucky we have been given a room to practice together, for free, without rent. I think when you get a free space to train, you can afford to shut up and keep mum about other conditions, such as, you can use the space, but if anyone gets hurt, OUT.

And being as we are college students, income is an issue for most members. I would not like to jeapordize the other's practice by potentially hurting someone on campus, when I already know I can hit hard, and Alec does too. We wouldn't have received any ranking at Khan's if we couldn't, and you broke 1 inch concrete based on ranking one was striving toward... not cause breaking is awesome, but to make sure you could hit hard. I still condition on the first slab I broke- it is no great feat, but it does require understanding how to hit properly, to both not hurt yourself, and demonstrate power.

For a small person, it is less about energy generation, and more about speed to get more strikes in. That does not mean we sacrifice power to the point of it not doing damage anymore, for otherwise why throw a technique?
 
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elder999

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Zenjael said:
I coul never imagine leaving a style behind, and no longer training or practicing in it, unless necessary for me to unadopt habits, to integrate the new techniques. That was, partly, why I gave up Moo duk Kwan for 5 years, to learn other styles of TKD.

As I've posted elsewhere, they were, in many ways, pretty much the same thing, TKD and Kyokushin, and I chose Kypkushin for contact and rigorous form.

A hunter cannot pursue two rabbits at once.
 

Tez3

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As I've posted elsewhere, they were, in many ways, pretty much the same thing, TKD and Kyokushin, and I chose Kypkushin for contact and rigorous form.

A hunter cannot pursue two rabbits at once.

That's just splitting hares..
 

Big Don

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Dude, I've been training longer than you've been alive and I still learn things. I don't, apparently, unlike you, claim to be a master of anything. The learning never stops.



LOL! If your fighting is anything like we saw in that clip, well.....I'll say this....against anyone with an ounce of skill, I hate to say it, but all that slap happy **** and 6 kicks before putting your leg down, really isnt going to amount to anything.

You are completely wrong, MJS! It will amount to a tremendous opening for the *** whipping he would receive.
 

Cyriacus

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Hehe.

No, but if injured, you are also not liable for the complete dissolution of the club you train at, meaning all the members would lose access with the club as well, for the university to avoid a lawsuit.

You know not everyone runs out of a University, of course. I know You seem to, but just to keep the tone.

NVCC is very non-compliant about us sparring, we do what we can, when we can, when we have the supervision nearby. But even then, it is done without contact... for once again, fear of lawsuit. Wearing pads would actually give the university cause to ban us, as opposed to this video which can be argued as Wushu form (though in an MA community I wouldn't, it just justifies us being able to practice.)

Interesting. I guess all the Uni's ive seen that have Full Contact Boxing and decent Wrestling Programs must be cheating the system somehow.

As money is an issue being a student, the only place I can train is for free NVCC, and occasionally at GMU, also for free, though it is with the odd, passing practitioner in the campus' lonely MA room. This isn't justification, it's just me pointing out that if I don't want to get thrown in jail for brawling in public, there are specific channels I have to take, which leave it difficult to demonstrate the contact desired.

It isnt brawling in Public if Youre Sparring. Ive sparred in a park once or twice, just for fun. Youre forgetting that if Youre both Martial Arts Students, its Training. Sparring is not Illegal. Fighting is Illegal. The word Sparring actually exists. Find Me an example of someone being arrested for disturbing the peace because They were Sparring with a fellow Martial Artist.

Next time you go heavy contact outside your school, without pads, let me know how it goes.

The last few times, it went great. Would You actually like to know about next time?

I've had crowds form, and police approach, even when we've cleared it ahead of time and used a free speech zone as reason for freedom of expression. At the end of the day, you might be able to do wushu form, or point spar, or even spar, but you will not get to use truly heavy contact in a public place, even indoors, without risk of disturbing the peace.

Ehehehe.

That just seems kind of duh.

Heh. Eheheh.

Heh.

its like ras, but without the skill.......
 

Josh Oakley

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If you supposedly can be killed by a strike to the thigh (though the burden of proof that such is even possible falls on you) it really doesn't make sense that you would so often present such a target by holding your leg out like that.

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Aiki Lee

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I could never imagine leaving a style behind, and no longer training or practicing in it, unless necessary for me to unadopt habits, to integrate the new techniques. That was, partly, why I gave up Moo duk Kwan for 5 years, to learn other styles of TKD.

If you like a particular style of martial arts then you should train in it until you have reach a high level of competency before training in something else or else you run the risk of not being able to observe or understand principles. People who jump from art to art are usually technique collecters who believe that the arts are all about the different techniques rather than the unique tactics and strategies they base their techniques around.


Having successfully survived two muggings, I think we will only know the answer to this if I emerge from after joining the military still alive. I join expecting not to survive, so that when I do join, I'll train harder and hopefully raise those odds when the time approaches.

First, why would you join the military not expecting to survive? You have a death wish? What is your motivation for joining? Secondly, most soldiers engaging in actual combat don't usually resort to unarmed combat so any training you do have in martial arts will likely not carry over to the military tactics you would apply in the armed forces based off the way you appear to be training. That doesn't mean martial arts training isn't beneficial for soldiers; it is. But much of what you describe in your posts strikes me as unrealistic and makes me and a few others, it seems, wonder about your training methodology.


I have heard of certain ninjutsu masters who have never in their entire martial career gotten to use the full force of the techniques they learned, for fear of killing. I am not saying we are that level, but I am saying we avoid injury to that degree, because of the possibility of legal concerns.

Where have you heard this from? Which ninjutsu masters?

For a small person, it is less about energy generation, and more about speed to get more strikes in. That does not mean we sacrifice power to the point of it not doing damage anymore, for otherwise why throw a technique?

I would not say speed. I would say timing. I would train with the assumption that all attackers will be stronger and faster than you.
 

MJS

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No, but if injured, you are also not liable for the complete dissolution of the club you train at, meaning all the members would lose access with the club as well, for the university to avoid a lawsuit. NVCC is very non-compliant about us sparring, we do what we can, when we can, when we have the supervision nearby. But even then, it is done without contact... for once again, fear of lawsuit. Wearing pads would actually give the university cause to ban us, as opposed to this video which can be argued as Wushu form (though in an MA community I wouldn't, it just justifies us being able to practice.)

As money is an issue being a student, the only place I can train is for free NVCC, and occasionally at GMU, also for free, though it is with the odd, passing practitioner in the campus' lonely MA room. This isn't justification, it's just me pointing out that if I don't want to get thrown in jail for brawling in public, there are specific channels I have to take, which leave it difficult to demonstrate the contact desired.

Next time you go heavy contact outside your school, without pads, let me know how it goes. I've had crowds form, and police approach, even when we've cleared it ahead of time and used a free speech zone as reason for freedom of expression. At the end of the day, you might be able to do wushu form, or point spar, or even spar, but you will not get to use truly heavy contact in a public place, even indoors, without risk of disturbing the peace. That just seems kind of duh.





When people do not intend to hurt each other, why would they appear to look as if they do? To me it appears sadder that the standard in the art is to hit hard, than to not at all. I love the machoness, but I do not like the disregard and potential for injury it can cause. Considering our club could be dissolved over a minor contusion, we have to take great caution in how we operate.

I do wish I could find some footage from Khan's, it would emphasize much better the background Alec and I have from a school which trained to hit very, very hard.

I have offered philosophically, politically, and mechanically why we are lacking contact. Sometimes you are given a situation where you are not able to execute your techniques. Perhaps it should be highlighted more, that it is better to be judged by twelve than carried by 6. I have found, at NVCC, that advise is good. We practice fighting, sparring when we can, but it is almost always offsite when we do so.

And we do not practice continuous, which is angering. We practice mainly 5 on 5, as a guised way to spar. If we are disingenuous at all, it is pretending certain drills are what we call them, and not the sparring sessions they actually are. But even these are light contact. Say we did go heavy, and someone broke a rib as I did from the contact during my 1st dan exam, to preserve the club we would not even be able to report the location of the injury, for risk of the club being removed. I wonder, if in part, this kind of policy is also what keeps George Mason from developing a club. I've seen even high schools with MA clubs, but I find a good university does not even have rudimentary elements of one outside of the Kendo club.

I have fought in the past, with heavy contact. the place, and time however, are very clear that we cannot do that without hurting others training, let alone our own.



You can cause quite a few things to do. If it requires more than one attempt to execute a joint-lock, or stun using arterial jabs, chances are you shouldn't try executing the technique at all, out of risk of doing exactly what you said... pissing them off.

Then why the hell are you training? Go take up knitting if you're afraid of contact. I know people who have fought bareknuckle, and they're still alive to talk about it. As I've said many times, which you seem to be missing, is contact is a part of the arts...period!!!! In my old Kenpo schools, when I'd spar, as I also said many times, which you're obviously missing, is I've geared the training to specific things. Some days I want to focus on a certain tech, so we'll go a bit slower. Other days, I may want to work something else. Other days I just go in and bag. In my Kyokushin class, its hard contact everytime. This is what we wear for gear:
http://www.karatemart.com/cloth-shin-instep-guard

http://www.karatemart.com/cloth-hand-guard

We wear headgear as well. Thats it! Once again, I'm still here, and all my classmates are still here as well. Sure, we get banged up, we get sore, but thats part of the game dude. If ya can't hack it, then get out of the dojo.

There is no reason whatsoever, that light to moderate (note I didn't say heavy) contact, can't be made. Gear up and do it!
 

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Heres an idea.....I believe JKS is in your area. Perhaps you can message him on here, and perhaps you can set up some quality training with him and his students.
 

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You both have good physical skills and that is a great starting platform.

In my opinion, what you show in the video is not very reflective of skilled fighting. Hands are down too often, too much standing on one leg, very little follow through, very little energy. This looks like a very friendly game of tag.

Here is what I look for in terms of fighting. Are the techniques thrown to gender a response in the opponent? This means are your attacks designed to either put him in a recovery mode or to finish him? If your techniques do not have either of these as a goal, you are just waving your hands and legs in the air. Obviously, you can pull your defense or offensive techniques so that you do not injure, but if they do not effect your opponent, why bother?

Specific things that made me cringe;
- Lack of a proper guard. Having your hands down so much of the time reflects either your disdain for his offense or not understanding the difference between a sporting art and defensive art...or both.
- Standing on one foot to launch multiple kicks that seem to have no purpose. A grappler or a person that plays at a system that works take downs would take great advantage of this.
- Striking once then disengaging. If you strike someone, take advantage of it! If you immediately disengage, you give up any advantage you have and start back from neutral. Why do this? A really experienced martial artist will eat your lunch if you do this, particularly if you retreat back in a straight line. A popular Wing Chun maxim is "If they retreat, you follow." I know other systems have similiar training concepts.
- Both participants left gaping holes on thier centerline. Yeah, this is something Wing Chun practitioners key on, but anyone with a good amount of experience will take advantage of that. Holes that big cannot be recovered in time to offer adequate defense against someone with good forward energy.

Both of you have the physical skills to improve. You guys have speed and flexability. It seems though that in your training there has been a lack of intent. That can be overcome, if you understand what you need to do.

I do take exception to you stating there was Wing Chun shown in this video. There are several different types of Wing Chun, but this video did not contain any of them. It is insulting to those of us who actualy train in that system to claim to represent even a small portion of Wing Chun, when you do not. Please do not do this. It makes you look bad and it makes Wing Chun look bad to people who do not know any better.

Good luck in your future training.
 

MJS

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I could never imagine leaving a style behind, and no longer training or practicing in it, unless necessary for me to unadopt habits, to integrate the new techniques. That was, partly, why I gave up Moo duk Kwan for 5 years, to learn other styles of TKD.

How can anyone expect to get good at something if they don't devote quality time to it? Once again, nothing wrong with cross training, but if you're jumping from 1 art to the next, spending a year here, 2months there, etc, you'll never get anywhere and the skills will not improve.



Which is it? I hit too hard... or I don't hit hard enough? I seem to get one of either in this forum, now. I posted this video in part because of the perception that I struck way too hard, recklessly, to give example that I'm not out of control. There is a lot of control in that video, And when we do hit, we make sure we're alright also.

But ah, Alec does hit, among the many people I train with. There are a few who do not, but the others push them to grow. People do not want to play with me in the sense they do not desire to play with Christian, who taught the Taijiquan program at our university for a time. Just as people may not desire to play with you; that does not mean you are doing anything wrong however. I asked the club, as per the advice, and I was informed that I do not, it is just hard to get a feel for winning. That is where the mindframe of the club is at, in continuous sparring, there is still something to 'win' as opposed to survive.

Umm...what? I think the video would've been better had you a) put on some gear, b) actually made some contact, c) actually threw some strikes and kicks that made contact and weren't all flash and slap.



I can think of at least 4 artists I have met who I am certain could do so using pressure points and arterial striking. The taijiquan practioner I have mentioned before could easily puncture cans with his jabs, and I've seen him chip bricks as well. It's why I started conditioning jab techniques as well, I was so impressed. I am certain Master Murray can do it, using acujutsu. I've seen him put people down in ways that are eyebrow raising. And so the list goes on, but I have witnessed people who understood the theory multiple times, and demonstrated the capability, but I suppose till I ever get to see it seen or demonstrated I will have to go off what I have been shown, and how to execute it.

And I'm sure, Master Murray, whoever the hell that is, spent (at least I'd like to think so) alot of years training. See, this is one example of what we're talking about. You see something you like, which is fine, but you try to get from A-Z, without hitting anything in between.

I have heard of certain ninjutsu masters who have never in their entire martial career gotten to use the full force of the techniques they learned, for fear of killing. I am not saying we are that level, but I am saying we avoid injury to that degree, because of the possibility of legal concerns.

Who are these "Masters" you speak of?? Furthermore, we, as martial artists, should be able to adapt whatever it is we're doing, to the situation. If every tech ends with a kill...well, doesnt sound like its something adaptable to every situation.
 

elder999

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MJS said:
. In my Kyokushin class, its hard contact everytime. This is what we wear for gear:
http://www.karatemart.com/cloth-shin-instep-guard

http://www.karatemart.com/cloth-hand-guard

We wear headgear as well. Thats it! Once again, I'm still here, and all my classmates are still here as well. Sure, we get banged up, we get sore, but thats part of the game dude. If ya can't hack it, then get out of the dojo.

There is no reason whatsoever, that light to moderate (note I didn't say heavy) contact, can't be made. Gear up and do it!

25-35 years ago, we mostly didn't wear anything for protection in kyokushin classes, and contact was pretty hard-especially when compared to everyone else. I think the headgear is something of an insurance requirement for this kind of sparring in some places, now, though.....

In 1974, a bunch of Japanese guys came to "train" with my seniors, and introduced us all to leg kicks, which they'd learned from muay thai practitioners.

Interestingly, in 38 years I've seen a variety of minor injuries over the years-broken toes, fingers, noses and the like-I never saw a broken leg or arm, or a death from a full-power kick to the thigh.

Guess they were doing it wrong.....:lfao:
 

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