Left handed but right footed which stance I should pick

HighKick

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Which stance I should pick?
One trainer tell me stay southpaw, you have a big advantage in this stance but every time I throw the jab my liver is open and the straight to my liver is the death shot for every southpaw
Dubios and Joshua drop Usyk with a bodyshot it’s the biggest weakness for a southpaw but in orthodox stance is my footwork better and I can use my lowkicks, in orthodox is my jab very powerful and hooks to the head and the liver I don’t know which stance I should pick I train boxing and Muay Thai, what should I do?

In southpaw stance I feel not comfortable like in orthodox my back foot is moving and not staying on the ground..
I would say you have a big advantage but need to know what is orthodox for you in each stance. If right footed, know when/where/why to have right foot back or forward. Same for a lead hand.
This is where kicking styles are very different from boxing.
 

Hanshi

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Depends on how you define "damage". I would consider being hit hard enough to end the fight damaging.

Bollocks. It takes a really severe injury to the liver before we ship you off to the OR. Minor liver lacerations are "watch and wait". Liver lacs are graded on a 5 scale. A grade 2 lac affects up to 50% of the livers surface area, has a hematoma up to 10cm diameter and penetrates up to 3cm into the parenchyma. Mostly those will get you a few days of bedrest and that's it. More than 80% of blunt force liver injuries will not require anything other than bedrest and monitoring. The overall mortality rate for liver injuries is a whopping 2-3%.



My post was obviously not fully explained. I used to watch and follow pro boxers as I've always been a real fan of boxing. The body punch to the right side floating ribs was seemingly described as "destroying the liver" or something similar. A destroyed liver is either death or a transplant as far as I understand it.

You are correct that the liver can heal from certain levels of injury. My brother died from liver disease and that meant, of course, major damage rather than a run-of-the-mill damage. This is what my post should have better explained. This particular punch has been a favorite of mine and the results very satisfying. These blows were always thrown while wearing 16/12 oz ? gloves (just can't recall) and less damaging than with bare fist.
 

Buka

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I believe if you’re teaching a striking art you should always train students to use both sides forward.

If a student is one that’s only going to train for a year or two, teaching them both sides is better for their health and physicality. It creates a better balance - exercise wise.

If a student is only going to train for a few months - other than his tuition, who cares?

If a student is going to train for ten years, or one that becomes a “lifer” you kind of have to teach him both sides. If you don’t, he’s going to wish you did.

Boxing, however, is different. It’s a specialized sport. Trying to teach them both sides isn’t the best way in my opinion.
 

Dirty Dog

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My post was obviously not fully explained. I used to watch and follow pro boxers as I've always been a real fan of boxing. The body punch to the right side floating ribs was seemingly described as "destroying the liver" or something similar.
It's probably unwise to use the hyperbole of sports commentators as the basis for anything remotely resembling a serious conversation. These are the geniuses who say things like "if they want to win, they're going to have to score more points" and "the trick to winning this [football] game is to move the ball down the field".
A destroyed liver is either death or a transplant as far as I understand it.
A "destroyed liver" in combat sports just isn't a thing. Has any fighter ever had a serious liver injury? I don't know. Maybe. But I haven't seen anything in the literature that I can recall, and a bit of research only turns up this (and studies with similar results).
In short, any real injury to the liver in combat sports is so rare as to not be worth worrying about.
My brother died from liver disease and that meant, of course, major damage rather than a run-of-the-mill damage.
I'm sorry to hear this. But liver disease really doesn't have anything to do with the topic of liver injury.
 

Bill Mattocks

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I'll say that being punched in the liver is not pleasant. Not even a little bit.
 

HighKick

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Depends on how you define "damage". I would consider being hit hard enough to end the fight damaging.

Bollocks. It takes a really severe injury to the liver before we ship you off to the OR. Minor liver lacerations are "watch and wait". Liver lacs are graded on a 5 scale. A grade 2 lac affects up to 50% of the livers surface area, has a hematoma up to 10cm diameter and penetrates up to 3cm into the parenchyma. Mostly those will get you a few days of bedrest and that's it. More than 80% of blunt force liver injuries will not require anything other than bedrest and monitoring. The overall mortality rate for liver injuries is a whopping 2-3%.
I get you. After '88 trials, really in an event leading up to them, I took a shot that injured my liver. Was told it was 45% damaged and that I should stop competing (which I did not). After a good bit of study and a 2nd opinion 4-weeks later, I was good to go. I have never had any issues since.
I do think it is important to define liver disease and liver damage/injury. Huge difference.
 
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