Left handed but right footed which stance I should pick

lowkicksensei

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Which stance I should pick?
One trainer tell me stay southpaw, you have a big advantage in this stance but every time I throw the jab my liver is open and the straight to my liver is the death shot for every southpaw
Dubios and Joshua drop Usyk with a bodyshot it’s the biggest weakness for a southpaw but in orthodox stance is my footwork better and I can use my lowkicks, in orthodox is my jab very powerful and hooks to the head and the liver I don’t know which stance I should pick I train boxing and Muay Thai, what should I do?

In southpaw stance I feel not comfortable like in orthodox my back foot is moving and not staying on the ground..
 

skribs

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In my Muay Thai class, we don't really pick a side. We train both sides. Although we do train orthodox more often, we do spend at least 25% of our time in southpaw.

In Taekwondo, we always tried to be 50/50 in our drilling.

Any time you're kicking, you're likely to change stances just from the kick itself. Even in boxing some folks switch, i.e. Lomachenko.
 

JowGaWolf

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Then go orthodox.
I would take whatever stand gives me the best footwork. It'll make everything else much easier. If orthodox means I have better movement, then that's where I want to go. I still would work on the other way, but it's good know which way one's feet like to move.

Grrrr.

ha ha ha. In this case it matters. Not because of the strikes but because of the footwork. lol I personally don't have trouble with footwork on either side. I never had, but when one side is really good, then use that side to help guide you to what the left side should operate like. It's like kicking. The good kicking leg informs the bad kicking leg of the motion it needs to do. Use the side that works to help train the side that doesn't. Or you can go the other way around, I wouldn't suggest using the bad side as using the standard of what the right side should be achieving lol.
 

marvin8

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Which stance I should pick?
One trainer tell me stay southpaw, you have a big advantage in this stance but every time I throw the jab my liver is open and the straight to my liver is the death shot for every southpaw
Are you aware of the following...?

The liver is on the right side of the body. From southpaw in open stance, your liver is open to the opponent's lead uppercut (not the rear straight) and lead kick.

From southpaw in open stance, your opponent's liver is open to your rear straight and your rear kick.

Dubios and Joshua drop Usyk with a bodyshot it’s the biggest weakness for a southpaw
Dubios and Joshua dropped Usyk with a rear hand to the body. However, they were not liver shots.

Blind side?
From southpaw open stance, you want lead foot dominance. Moving to the right will flank your opponent or bring you to their blind side.
 
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marvin8

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Which stance I should pick?
One trainer tell me stay southpaw, you have a big advantage in this stance but every time I throw the jab my liver is open and the straight to my liver is the death shot for every southpaw
Dubios and Joshua drop Usyk with a bodyshot it’s the biggest weakness for a southpaw but in orthodox stance is my footwork better and I can use my lowkicks, in orthodox is my jab very powerful and hooks to the head and the liver I don’t know which stance I should pick I train boxing and Muay Thai, what should I do?

In southpaw stance I feel not comfortable like in orthodox my back foot is moving and not staying on the ground..
A general way to put your choice is, “Do you want to fight with open stance (southpaw) strategies/tactics or closed stance strategies/tactics?” Southpaw fighters are more used to fighting in open stance. Orthodox fighters are more used to fighting in closed stance. Also in southpaw stance, your liver is in the front. In orthodox stance, your liver is in the rear.

In open stance, Ryan Garcia (orthodox) KOs Luke Campbell (southpaw) with lead hook to the liver.


In open stance, Anthony Pettis (southpaw) KOs Donald Cerrone (orthodox) with rear kick to the liver.

 

Wing Woo Gar

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Which stance I should pick?
One trainer tell me stay southpaw, you have a big advantage in this stance but every time I throw the jab my liver is open and the straight to my liver is the death shot for every southpaw
Dubios and Joshua drop Usyk with a bodyshot it’s the biggest weakness for a southpaw but in orthodox stance is my footwork better and I can use my lowkicks, in orthodox is my jab very powerful and hooks to the head and the liver I don’t know which stance I should pick I train boxing and Muay Thai, what should I do?

In southpaw stance I feel not comfortable like in orthodox my back foot is moving and not staying on the ground..
Do both, being able to switch is a skill that few have real ability with. Any combo you learn, take the time to learn it on both sides.
 

Oily Dragon

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Are you aware of the following...?

The liver is on the right side of the body.
No it's not.

The liver is shaped like an triangle covering the whole abdomen, sitting on top of the stomach, gall bladder etc, and and can be hit just as badly on the left side of the body, especially because of all that juicy tissue.

What does getting smashed in the "left hepatic duct" mean? It means your ***.

This is more of the "left vs right" duality that makes sense in European boxing, but falls to pieces in other arts.

1702146315355.png
 
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Oily Dragon

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Allow me to demonstrate the stupidity of the orthodox vs. southpaw "debates".

Complete with a "study" from the University of Manchester, wrapped in the Daily Mail...


I would like to know who reads this and doesn't hurl in their cornflakes.

Theory crafting makes me nauseous.
 

Oily Dragon

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Do both, being able to switch is a skill that few have real ability with. Any combo you learn, take the time to learn it on on both sides.
I don't even know if that is true, that few have it.

What I think is that boxing has a long history of left/right, and it makes a lot of sense, because of the limits of boxing, and the way boxing matches are analyzed.

I also think it goes out the window with other combat sports that don't have those limits, Muay Thai and MMA being to pop examples. TMA way? Always train both sides.

Hell, some CMA train fighting in 4 or 8 directions! Muay Thai has FLYING knees, which side/stance is best/safest from those? Answer: none.

Consider Mike Tyson. Great example of someone who could have said "well I'm a southpaw so gonna fight this way"...nope. trained orthodox, literally crushed the competition, and by the time he was elite, left and right no longer mattered esp to his opponents.

There's a Wing Chun centeline joke in here somewhere, but I feel like I should slow down a bit, or I'll lose people.
 

JowGaWolf

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No it's not.

The liver is shaped like an triangle covering the whole abdomen, sitting on top of the stomach, gall bladder etc, and and can be hit just as badly on the left side of the body, especially because of all that juicy tissue.

What does getting smashed in the "left hepatic duct" mean? It means your ***.

This is more of the "left vs right" duality that makes sense in European boxing, but falls to pieces in other arts.

View attachment 30430
I can't understand what the big deal is about hitting the liver when 90% of the people are head hunters. There are very few people out there who know the thrills of body shots.
 

Oily Dragon

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I can't understand what the big deal is about hitting the liver when 90% of the people are head hunters. There are very few people out there who know the thrills of body shots.
Very simple answer: the brain is protected by the skull. It can take loads of damage. Look at NFL CTE. Years of hits to cause that.

The chances of a head KO are greater than a body shot KO, and head strikes are worth more points, and most boxing matches end up in a decision. The average match is going to see each fighter take dozens of direct strikes to the head, but training is going to prevent all but a fraction from causing a KO.

The squishy organs around your belly are totally exposed outside of the ribs, and a strike to any one of them can cause immediate and permanent life changing damage. And for that reason, boxers train to use their abdominals muscles as sort of shield (one that doesn't work against an incoming teep or flying knee you're not prepared to receive, too)

This is why hitting below the belt is illegal in boxing: the belt isn't at the waist, it's midway up the abdomen for that reason.

Same reason weight lifting belts are designed the way they are.
 
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Dirty Dog

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No it's not.

The liver is shaped like an triangle covering the whole abdomen,
No it doesn't. The liver ends at about the mid-clavicular line. And that portion of the liver accounts for only about 10-15% of the total mass of the liver. Not to mention the very large area of the abdomen below the liver. In anatomy, the abdomen has 4 quadrants. The liver takes up a large portion (but not all) of the RUQ, a tiny bit of the LUQ, and is (except in some disease states) totally absent from the lower quadrants.
What does getting smashed in the "left hepatic duct" mean?
Organs have a left and right side and this doesn't necessarily have any connection to the location or orientation of the organ within the body. For example, in situs inversus with dextrocardia, the left ventricle and atrium will be towards the right side of the body and the right ventricle and atrium will be towards the left side of the body. The liver is similarly reversed, but the left hepatic duct remains the left hepatic duct.
 

Monkey Turned Wolf

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I go southpaw if I have the choice. Less people are used to it, and even less are people who know how to make use of southpaw strategies. That said, it only works if you got an instructor that knows southpaw-specific strategies, rather than just treating it the same as orthodox. If you don't, and don't have a preference, go orthodox.

Even in muay thai though, being able to switch between them after landing a kick forward or a sudden back away, and not having to waste a sec changing your stance back, is useful.
 

mograph

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Absolutely. They're basing their conclusion on this?

... when a left-handed fighter fought a right-handed competitor, around 54 per cent of the time the left-handed fighter got a higher rating.

I think that's what they call "slightly better than chance."

Nothing to see here, folks!
 

marvin8

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What I think is that boxing has a long history of left/right, and it makes a lot of sense, because of the limits of boxing, and the way boxing matches are analyzed.

I also think it goes out the window with other combat sports that don't have those limits, Muay Thai and MMA being to pop examples. TMA way? Always train both sides.

Hell, some CMA train fighting in 4 or 8 directions! Muay Thai has FLYING knees, which side/stance is best/safest from those? Answer: none.
Oh and here are a few courses on southpaw or open stance strategies by a well trained Muay Thai champion Petchmorakot and MMA trainers:

Southpaw Strategies To Becoming A Muay Thai Champion By Petchmorakot

Southpaw Striking Fundamentals By Chris Camozzi

Southpaw Strategy By Brandon Gibson

How To Fight And Defeat Southpaws By Teddy Atlas
 
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