How are you going to make TKD better?

Miles

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There seems to be a lot of MT threads which have as an underlying theme the eventual downfall of TKD due to ego/money/organization/politics/you-name-it.

If TKD fails, it will be because of a lot of individuals failed. My question to each of you is "How are YOU going to make TKD better?"


I'll answer my own question. I silently take an oath before each class pledging that I will try to do my best to teach my students in the best way that I know. I want them to work hard, play hard, and enjoy each other's company. I try to be an example to them by showing them I am still a student, that I still need to improve, that I can improve.
 

Kacey

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There seems to be a lot of MT threads which have as an underlying theme the eventual downfall of TKD due to ego/money/organization/politics/you-name-it.

If TKD fails, it will be because of a lot of individuals failed. My question to each of you is "How are YOU going to make TKD better?"


I'll answer my own question. I silently take an oath before each class pledging that I will try to do my best to teach my students in the best way that I know. I want them to work hard, play hard, and enjoy each other's company. I try to be an example to them by showing them I am still a student, that I still need to improve, that I can improve.

Indeed. I can't really add anything to that - as that's pretty much what I would have said in response to your question if you hadn't already said it.
 

IcemanSK

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Thanks for that, Miles. That really is the issue & our only resolve if we want to claim to be Taekwondoan. Teach to our highest level, challenge our students to reach beyond themselves, & enjoy doing this Art we love. We can do no more than that: and we should do no less.

Thanks Miles:asian:
 

exile

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I can't think of a better way to strengthen TKD, or any martial art, than to train students to practice it as a practical, street-effective combat system first and foremost. Not a sport, not a kind of aggressive calisthenics, not an exercise in dangerous-looking quasi-ballet, but as a fighting art, just as it was in the beginning. The wellsprings of the MAs are their origin as survival skills. When I teach kihon techniques, I make sure that my students understand something of the concealed streetwise combat uses of those techniques: upper 'blocks' as forearm strikes to the throat, down blocks as multiple elbow strike + hammerfist sequences, pivots as throws, kick chambers as knee attacks on the assailant's lower body. They learn hyungs along with the best bunkai for those hyungs that I can provide. And not only the principles and the analysis, but noncompliant training, increasingly more intense as the student advances, so that the reality of these techniques, and the necessity to train them reflexively, as potentially life-and-death level responses, is always clear, right in front of them.

Keep form always linked to its critical function—survival in the face of unsought physical violence, in the case of the MAs—and TKD will be ever green. That's the maxim that guides me in my version of 'making TKD better'...
 

Spookey

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Taekwon-Do ... in that spelling speaks volumes!

Tae Kwon - The physical portion taught as a means of self defense, physical education, and physical self improvement and growth.

Do - A way of life preserving the tenets and oath, the creed on which a better world may be built (whether it be the ITF tenets, WTF tenets, Code of the Hwa Rang, or natures general morals and ethics).

In certain instances peace cannot come but through war, in which the physical aspects of Tae Kwon are most easily seen, but the "Do" is the means of avoiding the conflicts of life prior to the necessity for force.

Teach your students what the "Do" really means, "Real Taekwon-Do", not just "the way of the foot and hand".

Be an example to your students, never misguide them with false claims, inferior techniques. rank flatery, or the "athlete" mentality. Remember what you are blessed to have learned and create students to surpass your own ability.

Most important of all, teach the missing tenet...MODESTY / HUMILITY!

TAEKWON,
SPookey
 

SJON

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In training, all the above.

Outside of training, by sharing whatever contribution I think I can make via discussion, books or whatever. The more we study, research and experiment, and the more we put it on the table, the stronger the current becomes.
 

HM2PAC

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Presently I am involved in ATA TKD. I am a newbie to TKD and am having a lot of issues with what I believe are problems with the fundamentals.

Our instructors don't seem to have all the problems that I have read about on the internet, and they themselves are very concerned about the reputation the ATA has earned for itself.

This thread made me start thinking about my classes. The technique of what is being taught is very good. We do self-defense, forms, sparring, calisthenics, and weapons. Some people just go through the motions. Some people really look like they are about to whack an aggressor with their Bhangmang Ee.

There are some who do not put forth much effort. I need to encourage those people. When I go to class I need to put everything into it, otherwise I will not get out all of what I necessarily can.
 

MasterWright

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My way of making TKD better is to have a group of students taught to the best of my ability, as iceman has mentioned. Promote a strong school with linke to credible Federations, in our case the Kukkiwon.
 

YoungMan

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By teaching Taekwondo as a Way of Life that students can be proud to practice and be a part of.

To me, the best gift I can give students is to instill in them a passion for it, so that 10-20-30 years later they're still glad to be doing it.
 

bluekey88

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I do my best to teach my students ALL aspects of the art to the best of my ability. I strive daily to improve my abilities and understabnding of ALL aspects of the art so as to better pass that knowledge on to those who seek to learn from me.

That is all I can do.

Peace,
Erik
 

StuartA

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"Of every 100 men:
10 shouldn't even be here...
80 are nothing but targets...
9 are real fighters...
We are lucky to have them...
They the battle make...
Ahh, but the One, One of them is a Warrior
...and he will bring the others back."

- Hericletus, 500 BC

---------------------
-- To me, it just a case of deciding which one you want to be!

Stuart
 

Tez3

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I can't think of a better way to strengthen TKD, or any martial art, than to train students to practice it as a practical, street-effective combat system first and foremost. Not a sport, not a kind of aggressive calisthenics, not an exercise in dangerous-looking quasi-ballet, but as a fighting art, just as it was in the beginning. The wellsprings of the MAs are their origin as survival skills. When I teach kihon techniques, I make sure that my students understand something of the concealed streetwise combat uses of those techniques: upper 'blocks' as forearm strikes to the throat, down blocks as multiple elbow strike + hammerfist sequences, pivots as throws, kick chambers as knee attacks on the assailant's lower body. They learn hyungs along with the best bunkai for those hyungs that I can provide. And not only the principles and the analysis, but noncompliant training, increasingly more intense as the student advances, so that the reality of these techniques, and the necessity to train them reflexively, as potentially life-and-death level responses, is always clear, right in front of them.

Keep form always linked to its critical functionsurvival in the face of unsought physical violence, in the case of the MAsand TKD will be ever green. That's the maxim that guides me in my version of 'making TKD better'...

If I weren't already involved in other styles it's precisely this that would attract me to train in TKD.
 

exile

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"Of every 100 men:
10 shouldn't even be here...
80 are nothing but targets...
9 are real fighters...
We are lucky to have them...
They the battle make...
Ahh, but the One, One of them is a Warrior
...and he will bring the others back."

- Hericletus, 500 BC

---------------------
-- To me, it just a case of deciding which one you want to be!

Stuart

To me, the bolded part is the real payoff, esp. the underlined word.

The will to do something is the most important part of getting it done. Focused desire, with undermining distractions stamped down completely. There is now some interesting evidence, reported in a recent Scientific American: Mind article, that tenacity—holding to purpose long enough—is the single most important factor in people's success. It's not a matter of being one of the lucky elect or something like that, of either being a born winner or a born loser, though there's a major element in American culture which sees things along those lines (though it wasn't always that way). The fact is, as Stuart's post highlights, individual MAists have a lot of control over the quality of the contribution they can make.

The first step is a clear vision of what you want to accomplish in the art and how your accomplishment in turn will move the art forward. The second step is making the sustained effort necessary to do it, and that second step is really the biggie. Because you aren't necessarily going to see the fruits of your own effort in any clear way. You have to invest the effort with the expectation that good will come out of it even if you can't see that good. Teachers are used to this uncertainty about the effect of their work, and persevere in spite of it. If people combine that perseverence with the necessary clarity of purpose, and critical judgment, they are going to make TKD better no matter which direction they follow in that cause, I believe.
 
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Kwanjang

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I, like Miles, before class, Recite (in my head) the instructors Oath I learned.

I will teach this class as if it is the most important class I will ever teach...I will teach with enthusiasm, passion and patience. I will lead by example.
 

StuartA

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The will to do something is the most important part of getting it done. Focused desire, with undermining distrations stamped down completely.

Exactly.. "YOU have to be the change you want to see in the world" - Ghandi!


Sorry to keep using quotes, but they express things better than I ever could. Unfortunatly, my previous quote works with the TKD population at large (IMO).. soem are happy to tread water, others do better and only a small majority (the One) does whats needed.. thank god for the one (or the few IMO)!

Stuart
 

hkfuie

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My theory has always been that my instructor taught me all he could, but he can't teach me everything he knows. I think it is impossible for him to convey everything he knows. So when I teach, if I just repeat what he taught, then I will teach just a little less than he taught. Then my students will know just a little less than I...

So I continue to train and a big part of that is learning other arts. I decided to train in jujitsu b/c while TKD focuses on striking, we do only a little joint locking and throwing. I did learn some of that from my instructor. But why not go learn more from the people who specialize in it?

Also, I am constantly working out how I can make self-defense skills more hard-wired. I am always looking for ways to make my teaching more effective. And I truly want my students to be BETTER than I. Some already are, in some ways.

I think I have to STRIVE to make my art better, not just repeat it - improve it.
 

TKDHermit

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aparrt from all that has been mentioned, about the primal intentions of TKD as a set of survival techniques, i would like to correct the corrupt basic technical language, and more use of korean commands [maybe omit the names of techniques i dont want my students to go bonkers remembering all these]. These are all based on what is going in in Singapore.

what do i mean by "corrupt basic technical language"? a very prime example in singapore: apart from the official governing federation of KKWTKD in singapore, other taekwondo exponents ALWAYS call their dobok as gi. and they dont know the names of the poomsae. The most ridiculous one i ever heard was someone referring to "Koryo" as "POOMsae" because "Poom" belts do it.

korean commands? i think what i would like to see are the commands being completely korean, not mixed with english. technique names in english are fine, too many to remember may cause my students[quite alot of kids] to go bonkers. the most common set of commands during grading would be: *spellings may not be correct, the ones i would like corrected are in brackets*.

charyeot
kyeong-rye
junbi [name of poomsae, junbi]
PATTERN, OWN TIMING [remove]
sijak
*finishes poomsae*
baro
BASIC KICK + names of kicks in english [a korean command here, directly translating from english, kibon chagi, although im not sure if theres a better/actual command for this]
*kihap*, *kihap*, dwiro dora, *kihap* *kihap*, dwiro dora - one kihap is 1 kick/combination
baro
FACE UR PARTNER [there should be a korean command to this if im not wrong]
charyeot
kyeong-rye
junbi/sparring junbi [kyeorugi junbi]
sijak
*finishes sparring*
keuman
charyeot
kyeong-rye
face the front [again, korean command]
kyeong-rye
OUT. [haesan**]

**i wasnt sure about how this was used, whether only at the end of class or what, until the korean national demo team came. in their command recording for their demo they used 'haesan' after performing segments like poomsae.

yeah so if i were to change the tkd in singapore, or if i open my own class, that is what i would start with.
 
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