Zenjael's Self-Defense Methodologies

shesulsa

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Zenjael, I will totally cop to asserting that age does come into play here but not for quite the reasons you think.

The way your school is run, the way you have learned and trained, the way you teach ... is all you know. It is what you have known for many years and what you have grown up on. You've learned and trained to respect your elders, your teachers, you've been taught to believe in all you know, all you learn. You've been humbled and celebrated in very particular ways.

You are still, in essence, "living at home."

I believe you do lack a maturity - maturity in technique and in understanding. Even after 15 years in my current art and many years on the sidelines in Kenpo, I can learn a new technique, memorize it and probably even share it with others; that said, my understanding of that technique would be deeper if I had the curriculum and fundamental knowledge of the source style on board and it will deepen still over the course of time and with much repeated practice.

There is no reason to take offense at such a statement - even though you have all these years of experience behind you, many of them are years of childhood spent. Surely even you can't believe the average high school soccer player who has played since age 3 is on par with an adult player who has played soccer even 10 years.

Take some time with this and sit back and reflect, friend.
 

SahBumNimRush

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I am truly curious about Zenjael's knife skills, and how he practices. Hopefully he can provide some more recent footage, beyond his "XMA" style knife forms.. .
 

Bill Mattocks

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I am truly curious about Zenjael's knife skills, and how he practices. Hopefully he can provide some more recent footage, beyond his "XMA" style knife forms.. .

I believe he already refused, on the basis that his knowledge was too dangerous to let others see it or something like that.
 

clfsean

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I believe he already refused, on the basis that his knowledge was too dangerous to let others see it or something like that.

Yeah it was in relation to my asking to see his first palm change from "his" bagua training. His position was it wasn't going to change anything so why should he.
 

seasoned

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Last activity 03-19-2012 05:34: This I think, is a very good indication............
 

Instructor

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Going back to the OP. I have actually been attacked with a blade, in real life. I couldn't run away because I was looking after two small children. I used a plastic child safety car seat as a shield. That little seat was stabbed repeatly, in fact one of the arms fell off. I came through the experience without a scratch.

If somebody comes at me with a knife I look for something to use as a shield. In my EXPERIENCE this is a lot saner than trying to do some fancy martial arts move.
 

Dirty Dog

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I have been attacked with a knife once (I posted the story of how I lost my eye some time ago). I've taken knives off more psych patients than I can think off, and guns off two that I can recall off hand.

The most recent knife incident involved an agitated man in the lobby. Security came to get me. They told me that he was pacing and muttering and he had said things that made them think he might be armed. I went to the lobby and asked him to come talk to me (in an area away from other patients and staff, and with room to move). I asked him if he was there to be seen, and he said yes. I told him that there was concern that he might be armed. He made no reply. I told him that he had to either allow a patdown or leave. He reached behind his back and pulled out a fixed blade knife with a 5" blade and raised it up to shoulder level. A fine position from which to slash. By the time his hand was drawn back, I had one hand on his wrist, and one on his throat. Swept his leg and took him down while controlling his knife arm. He landed on his back, and I stepped across and used his knife arm as a lever to get him face down. I removed the knife from his hand. About that time 4 security officers landed on him, ending the confrontation. Physical and chemical restraints followed promptly, as did a trip to a psychiatric inpatient facility. Once we got him in the back we removed 2 more knives. One from a pocket and one strapped to his leg.

My opinions, based on my experiences:
Obviously, avoid the situation if it is in any way possible to do so without endangering others.
Get control of the weapon, and keep control of it.
If you can drop them while they're deploying the weapon, do it. Don't wait till it's out and ready for use.
Get control of the weapon and keep control of it.
Keep your actions simple and direct.
Get control of the weapon and keep control of it.
If it's already out, be super cooperative, find a way to distract them, and drop them. My failure to follow steps 2 and 3 when I was 17 are why I now have 1 eye.

Even in a situation like mine, and knowing full well that the hospital will never back me, injury to the attacker is my last concern. My concern is my safety, the safety of other staff, and the safety of innocents. While I have not yet had to injure any of the people I've disarmed (other than the mugger who took my eye) I am completely willing to do so, if it is absolutely necessary. I'll also help patch them up afterwards. And then I'll find a new job, knowing how the hospital administrators are.

One thing I have noticed is that people who are armed tend to focus on the weapon. A man with a knife, in my experience, pretty much forgets that he can use his other hand, or his feet.
 

jks9199

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Last activity 03-19-2012 05:34: This I think, is a very good indication............

Spring Break at GMU did end & classes resumed on Monday. He may simply be busy... I mean, school, and teaching apparently in 2 places... that makes for a busy schedule.
 

Buka

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Probably a nice kid. To some extent, we are all a product of how we were taught in our Dojos.

But coming to this forum is like walking into a dugout at Yankee Stadium and arguing about your T-Ball game. You're bound to get some tobacco juice spit onto your PF Flyers.
 

Flying Crane

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I have been attacked with a knife once (I posted the story of how I lost my eye some time ago). I've taken knives off more psych patients than I can think off, and guns off two that I can recall off hand.

The most recent knife incident involved an agitated man in the lobby. Security came to get me. They told me that he was pacing and muttering and he had said things that made them think he might be armed. I went to the lobby and asked him to come talk to me (in an area away from other patients and staff, and with room to move). I asked him if he was there to be seen, and he said yes. I told him that there was concern that he might be armed. He made no reply. I told him that he had to either allow a patdown or leave. He reached behind his back and pulled out a fixed blade knife with a 5" blade and raised it up to shoulder level. A fine position from which to slash. By the time his hand was drawn back, I had one hand on his wrist, and one on his throat. Swept his leg and took him down while controlling his knife arm. He landed on his back, and I stepped across and used his knife arm as a lever to get him face down. I removed the knife from his hand. About that time 4 security officers landed on him, ending the confrontation. Physical and chemical restraints followed promptly, as did a trip to a psychiatric inpatient facility. Once we got him in the back we removed 2 more knives. One from a pocket and one strapped to his leg.

jeezus. that's intense.
 

seasoned

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Probably a nice kid. To some extent, we are all a product of how we were taught in our Dojos.

But coming to this forum is like walking into a dugout at Yankee Stadium and arguing about your T-Ball game. You're bound to get some tobacco juice spit onto your PF Flyers.
Very very well put.
 
OP
Z

Zenjael

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I am sorry to hear about your loss, but I am happy you survived your encounter. You are right that they focus on the weapon... it was how I managed to get the knife away myself the first time I was mugged. But then again, that was middle school, against two other people of likewise age. Hardly as dangerous as what others have gone through.

I'm not leaving the forum unless the mods decide to ban me, but I'm not interested in being ragged on. If you guys would like to see my knife skills now, I will happily post a video down the road. Right now I do not possess a camera suitable, as we did a few months prior. And there is a difference between knife wielding, and knife self-defense.

Thank you for making this thread, it was very kind of whoever put it in this section of the forum.
 
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