Zenjael's Self-Defense Methodologies

MJS

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Do not offer a limb when you do not have to, especially as a goad as some are want to do to initiate the other strike. But if a machete is coming toward your head, lose your arm over the fatal strike.

The loss of that limb could be the fatal strike. No, sorry, for myself, I'm not going to sacrifice a body part, if I don't have to.
 

frank raud

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How did I miss this gem? When asked how many people you know who have broken arm with a crescent kick, this is your reply


When learning Krav Maga, and Muai Thai, I would say nearly everyone who had been practicing over two years. Never underestimate aggression and inertia.


O'rly?

Wow. So we can safely assume you have less than two years of training in Krav or Muay Thai? Two arts you left out of the hodge podge of arts you claim in your MMA sparing video?
 
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Zenjael

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Oaktree, if it is permissible, would there be a way to obtain the contact information (e-mail) of your teacher. I would love to speak with him. As I said before, I have been watching his videos for quite some time. Sadly my own master passed away, and though our styles are different, your teachers grasp of the basics, and of course beyond that, is enough it's allowed me to retain, and even improve on my own ability in the art. I could not do tight circles until I watched his introductory video on it, and for some reason how he explained it made it finally click in a sense I could use it in combative training.

"First, there's no such thing as "Okinawan Karate" as a ryu."

I agree, and you did not see me saying it was a ryu. In fact I've said the opposite- it's rather undeveloped, and there is a good reason. Okinawan Karate is not tied to a family, or single branch of art. It has drawn from southern style Gongfu elements, combined with south Japanese martial art styles, and finally added to by American military combat training, which was added during our occupation of that land.

However, just because it is a ryu, does not mean whatsoever that it is lacking in techniques specific to a style which can only be found in Okinawa, or by people who have learned from those in the area. You'll find because Okinawan is not a ryu-like style that many claim it is what spread martial arts, and inspired a multitude of styles. I'm not saying that, merely that who I learned from referred to it only as Okinawan Karate, with elements of Shotokan and Tang Soo Do added.

If he created something he called "Okinawan Karate" and taught it to you, that's cool and all, but really, there's no such thing.

I believe actually Master Murray hails from central United States, but I could be incorrect. He spends virtually all his time traveling, and giving seminars.

And even if he DID make it up, I wouldn't have retained its usage if it was a fail art. It works, and it is distinct stylistically from other forms of Karate I have learned, or seen, while retaining core tenets which allow it to still be aligned as karate.

The term 'acujutsu' I have never heard anywhere save from a few people I have trained with, under the same master. All acujutsu is the systemized application of using acupuncture points incorporated into combat. This has existed for as long as acupuncture has been understood.

That does not mean however that it is not incredibly effective.

The turned lion stance I use most often when sparring is my own modification to the bagua stance because of my own unique background. Just because something is innovative, should not disclude its utility. That being said, Okinawan martial arts have existed for some time.

"Second, it's like saying "I was a white belt, and now I'm a green belt, so I know EVERYTHING now.""

As I have said before, if you were the most experienced martial artist, who would you choose to learn from? You NEVER stop growing, and you never have total insight.

Nothing in martial arts comes from you, even if it was you who invented the technique. It was through others you learned the movements to give you the ability to create that technique.

You have no idea how unimpressed I am with the notion that you're a senior in college now.

To be honest, neither am I. A bachelor's nowaday is equivalent, and about as common as high school degrees are, and only valued slightly more. My point is that you posted a video of me from years ago, while still underage, and in high school (I question how skilled the people we culturally uphail as legendary figures in the arts were as gifted as they were in adulthood as they were in high school) when I had yet to implement many of the styles I had learned into a unified school of fighting. Especially when you posted a video of me... hours after I had posted one of me sparring within the last two months, and the difference in ability is marked.

And it should be. If you haven't grown significantly in the span of years, while training, than one is not training right.

The perception of someone my age is like telling me you just took the training wheels off your bike. Good for you, but Lance Armstrong, you ain't.

And to me, your perception that age is of any relevancy to enlightenment in martial arts, is like saying to someone who breaks cinder blocks they should practice breaking boards more.

The argument is stupid either way- when is breaking either a board or cinderblock condusive toward protecting yourself.

Likewise, how is age relevant when a person can do just that.

There is a Master I have who I respect particularly. As my good training partner Alec put it, what he was looking for from his student was himself. And he promoted only when his standards were met.

We had an individual who received their 4th at 17, and Master Khan would bow to him as respectfully as any master. Because here's the thing- Master Leahy is just that, and a genius at the arts. An absolute genius.

And at 13 when he received his 3rd dan, he was a force to be reckoned with.

Though you may not have encountered such individuals, perhaps it is time for you to step outside the confines of the one school you have attended and see a bit more of the world... through the eyes of a martial artist of course.

I do not claim to be great, to win tournaments, to deserve to be in movies. I have offered explanations for techniques, and stated what I can do with honesty.

Why not give us some updated videos of your knife skills now as they have progressed according to you... and why not throw the first palm change in from your bagua as well. Then show us how they work.

My students who are 6 years old ask me this question, and I have never answered it with acquiescing their request. If you would like to see how I spar, you can find a video of me on this forum already. I have nothing to prove to you, for I know what I can do, and even if I did show you, what would it prove for me, save that what I said originally was not improper, and was disagreed upon for difference in stylistics. In the end, nothing is solved, and I'm stuck once again in a loop of not being taken at my word- which on a forum for martial artists I find a tad disrespectful.

When people discuss self-defense, you do not see me requesting videos of their performance. I have nothing to prove here, just to learn, and share.

The ability to wield knives, or how to shoot a gun, does not necessitate extreme skill in being able to disarm. And wielding and disarming are very different.

Example; in kendo I learned how to weild a shinai, bokken, and katana. It was not until a sifu visiting from Japan instructed our budokai group in kenjutsu that I learned about the guided disarms for Japanese swordwork.

If you would like to see a good palm change, I advise you to look up the teacher Oaktree posted videos of. He is a very gifted teacher and practitioner.

Wow. So we can safely assume you have less than two years of training in Krav or Muay Thai? Two arts you left out of the hodge podge of arts you claim in your MMA sparing video?

Please do not strawman. My statement was that people who have trained in those styles for that amount of time, normally have the kicks capable of breaking bones. Then again, I think taking over a year to earn the first dan in any (in terms of skill level) to be absurd. I have practiced in both styles for longer than two years, but not long enough for me to particularly say I've specialized in the techniques. Krav Maga is an amalgamation of techniques from different arts, though with the guideline of efficiency stressed. I happen to enjoy krav maga because it focuses on aggression to neutralize an attack, and I've that to work for me.A

Additionally, neither Alec, nor myself utilized muai thai at any point in the footage I chose to keep for the video- that does not mean we have not practiced it. However, you can see in numerous parts of the video krav maga utilized. I believe I also left Muai Thai out because of spacing constraints for what I could tag, but if you'll notice I did include MMA which tends to utilize muai thai. I strongly think it missleading to state we were practicing an art, in the video, when I edited out any techniques were of that style. Seems disingenuous. That being said, if you look at 16.1 seconds to 17 seconds in the video, there is a very clear Muai Thai stance Alec uses. That was the first one I came across, and I am certain there are more, since it is a style he likes a lot more than I do. the only unfortunate side is that his knee injuries keep him from being able to execute their brutal kicks, and hence why he opted to use chung do kwan kicks, when he kicks at all in the video.



He and I both have a background involving numerous martial arts, and as such, we tend to switch styles a lot.

My apologies for coming off harsh at all, it is getting old fast, the skepticism of people who would find that we agree on a lot of things, and there is little need for the headbutting I feel occurring.
 
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oaktree

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Oaktree, if it is permissable, would there be a way to obtain the contact information (e-mail) of your teacher. I would love to speak with him. As I said before, I have been watching his videos for quite some time. Sadly my own master passed away, and though the styles are different, your teachers grasp of the basics, and of course beyond that, is enough it's allowed me to retain, and even improve on my own ability in the art. I could not do tight circles until I watched his introductory video on it, and for some reason how he explained it made it finally click in a sense I could use it in combative training.
Kent is not my teacher but my teacher and Kent do share the same line through Wang Shu Jin. My teacher trained under someone who trained with Wang Shu Jin, while Kent trained with Wang Shu Jin. Alot of the videos Kent put out do speak about the similar things my teacher refers to however my teacher's teacher also trained with 2 other Bagua teachers so our Bagua is a bit different. Wang Shu Jin passed in 1981 so I am sure Kent has been practicing at least since then so his knowledge on Bagua is excellent. I have spoken to Kent briefly through his Youtube channel you can send him a message.
 

frank raud

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So you refuse to show your six year old students your knife skills, even when they ask? Such restraint on your part. This just gets better and better.

Your reply to the question of how many people you know who have broken bones with their kicks is most people who you trained with in Krav and muay Thai. Now it is that people with two years experience are CAPABLE of generating enough power to do so. And you say I use strawman arguements? Just a thought. If you make a statement,try and stand by it, not weasel around, mebbe then things wont seem so disrespectful.
 

Gnarlie

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There was me wondering what to read now the Sword & Hammer thread has slowed down.

Zenjael, with respect, I have to agree with what other people have said to you on this board. You're coming across as very full of yourself and making some pretty confident sounding statements, but your style of communication does not ring true to somebody with that level of ability and experience.

Reality check: I would recommend considering that this board is international across the entire English-speaking world, and some of the people who frequent it are among most experienced and knowledgeable martial artists in that world. Many of them are exposed to real violence daily. You are 22. I don't care how many arts one has studied, one is not an expert at anything at the age of 22. One is not even an expert at being alive when one is 22.

If you were as experienced and talented as you seem to think you are, you'd have accumulated enough wisdom to display humility when presenting yourself on the world stage.

I've not been training as long as you, nor do I profess to be a martial arts expert. Mostly, I lurk here and ask questions sometimes. I learn a lot. I don't feel like I'm going to be learning much from you unless you can reconsider and revise how you are delivering your information. I can't even work out if there's anything good there, because I can't hear myself think over the sound of how awesome you think you are.

Feel free to PM me if you would like some direct and constructive feedback about your existing posts and some suggestions as to how you can put your points forward in a less irritating way. The reactions you're currently getting I think are more to do with how you are coming across than what you are actually saying.
 

Bill Mattocks

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"First, there's no such thing as "Okinawan Karate" as a ryu."

I agree, and you did not see me saying it was a ryu. In fact I've said the opposite- it's rather undeveloped, and there is a good reason. Okinawan Karate is not tied to a family, or single branch of art. It has drawn from southern style Gongfu elements, combined with south Japanese martial art styles, and finally added to by American military combat training, which was added during our occupation of that land.

Your understanding of the Okinawan forms of karate are also lacking.

However, just because it is a ryu, does not mean whatsoever that it is lacking in techniques specific to a style which can only be found in Okinawa, or by people who have learned from those in the area. You'll find because Okinawan is not a ryu-like style that many claim it is what spread martial arts, and inspired a multitude of styles. I'm not saying that, merely that who I learned from referred to it only as Okinawan Karate, with elements of Shotokan and Tang Soo Do added.

That's just completely wrong. Really. Completely wrong.

And to me, your perception that age is of any relevancy to enlightenment in martial arts, is like saying to someone who breaks cinder blocks they should practice breaking boards more.

Age is relevant to everything, you just don't know it yet. There are some few young men and women who have maturity. Some are what one would expect of their age, and some are incredibly immature. I would class you as the latter. Age doesn't matter? I promise you when you are 40, you will look back at your words and think yourself a fool.

Likewise, how is age relevant when a person can do just that.

You will understand when you get older. Or more mature. Whichever comes first.

There is a Master I have who I respect particularly. As my good training partner Alec put it, what he was looking for from his student was himself. And he promoted only when his standards were met.

We had an individual who received their 4th at 17, and Master Khan would bow to him as respectfully as any master. Because here's the thing- Master Leahy is just that, and a genius at the arts. An absolute genius.

And at 13 when he received his 3rd dan, he was a force to be reckoned with.

No, he wasn't. A 13 year old boy can be broken like a twig; I don't care what belt he wears around his waist.

Though you may not have encountered such individuals, perhaps it is time for you to step outside the confines of the one school you have attended and see a bit more of the world... through the eyes of a martial artist of course.

Son, I'm a US Marine. And former law enforcement too. I've lived on Okinawa and been around the world twice. Tell me about your worldly experiences speaking to Angi Uezu in Japan about karate. I've spoken with the man - hell, he worked with me in Okinawa. Come on now, tell me of your vast world-traveling experiences.

I do not claim to be great, to win tournaments, to deserve to be in movies. I have offered explanations for techniques, and stated what I can do with honesty.

Not exactly. You have stated that you are expert in a variety of things you have shown to have very little to no knowledge of, plus an astonishing array of dan ranks in a large variety of styles, each of which you have claimed to have mastered. You've put yourself forward as an expert, and even asked advice of others if you are 'just too darned good' for your students. I know why they don't want to spar with you. They don't like you, is my guess. You're a loudmouth braggart and a showoff, and you don't have a great deal to back it up with.

You also stay the most insulting things; suggesting that actual masters of their arts who post here should watch your video and learn from it. OMG. No, seriously. OMG. If you were a bit more snide, I'd actually think you meant it as a form of humor, like that Jim Carrey clip! Yeah, you're that bad.

What you do have is talent, youth and enthusiasm, and those stand you in good stead. As I've said, if you could dial the "I love me" ******** down a couple notches, you'd probably do just fine. I don't think you're a troll, I think you're an egomaniac with maybe a little Asberger's in the mix.

You have come here and asked for a seat at the table. Hey, it's open to all, and you're more than welcome. But that doesn't make you a senior member, it doesn't make your an expert, and your bonafides look to a lot of us like a collection of McDojo junk certificates.

My apologies for coming off harsh at all, it is getting old fast, the skepticism of people who would find that we agree on a lot of things, and there is little need for the headbutting I feel occurring.

The skepticism is well-founded, I feel. I am actually giving you credit for at least possessing the rankings you claim; I just don't think they've given you a lot of ability to go with the paper and the belt. Young, brash, and insolent works if you're really that good. You're not. You need to slow WAY down, listen to a few folks, and stop injecting your expert opinion in places where it clearly is not.

I've tried using humor to get through to you. I've tried gentle hints, even if they were a bit acerbic or sarcastic. I've tried speaking very plainly. You don't seem to get it. OK, your decision. You may find that the hostility you currently find uncomfortable will become something worse; silence. At that point your opinion moves from absurd and incorrect to irrelevant. Everyone puts you on ignore and you can pontificate to yourself.
 

MJS

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We had an individual who received their 4th at 17, and Master Khan would bow to him as respectfully as any master. Because here's the thing- Master Leahy is just that, and a genius at the arts. An absolute genius.

And at 13 when he received his 3rd dan, he was a force to be reckoned with.

Sorry, but thats a joke! IMO, I don't believe in giving a BB to anyone under the age of 16. Sure, some schools do a Jr. BB. That, I can agree with to a point. Of course, when they're adults, they need to re-test. But a 13yr old thats a 3rd dan...LMFAO! I'd laugh at the student as well as the teacher! Anyone who does that, is running a mcdojo!



Please do not strawman. My statement was that people who have trained in those styles for that amount of time, normally have the kicks capable of breaking bones. Then again, I think taking over a year to earn the first dan in any (in terms of skill level) to be absurd. I have practiced in both styles for longer than two years, but not long enough for me to particularly say I've specialized in the techniques. Krav Maga is an amalgamation of techniques from different arts, though with the guideline of efficiency stressed. I happen to enjoy krav maga because it focuses on aggression to neutralize an attack, and I've that to work for me.A

I hate using this as a measuring stick, but I may have to here. Since the UFC consists of pro fighters, I wonder...how many broken bones from kicks have we seen in MMA? Am I reading this right....you think its absurd if it takes longer than a year to get a BB? Son, you have alot to learn. Any real school will make you train many years before a BB is given.




He and I both have a background involving numerous martial arts, and as such, we tend to switch styles a lot.

Out of curiosity, how long have you trained in each of these arts that you claim?
 

clfsean

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My students who are 6 years old ask me this question, and I have never answered it with acquiescing their request. If you would like to see how I spar, you can find a video of me on this forum already. I have nothing to prove to you, for I know what I can do, and even if I did show you, what would it prove for me, save that what I said originally was not improper, and was disagreed upon for difference in stylistics. In the end, nothing is solved, and I'm stuck once again in a loop of not being taken at my word- which on a forum for martial artists I find a tad disrespectful.

Wow... you sure showed me.

Another freebie...

sifu = teacher (Cantonese)
sensei = teacher (Japanese)

sifu =! Japanese kendo teacher
 
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Zenjael

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I hate using this as a measuring stick, but I may have to here. Since the UFC consists of pro fighters, I wonder...how many broken bones from kicks have we seen in MMA? Am I reading this right....you think its absurd if it takes longer than a year to get a BB? Son, you have alot to learn. Any real school will make you train many years before a BB is given.

I would venture to say then that the black belt in that school is ritualized. That's fine, to each school's own philosophy.

But with dedication, one should be able to learn the execution of the techniques in the system within a month, tops, if they were truly committed and devoted their time to it. It only takes, from what I was told, around 500 sequences of a technique for it to become muscle memory, and about 2000 for it to become instinctual response memory.

So that we don't memorize useless clutter, our brains have a technique where they effectively edit out repetitousnous. For example, if you touch your nose and foot at the same time, you feel them simultaneously. However, physically the nerves from your foot take longer to arrive, and as such we should feel a delay, even if minor. The reason we don't, is that the brain edits out that gap.

If one cannot learn, say, the first 100 basic techniques in a system in a month, I would advise them to work on their ability to absorb information and how they train. For most forms, and katas, I need to watch it twice and can emulate it in the style. A lot of people who cross-train in styles eventually find themself able to do this.

I see no reason, with an adequate teacher teaching the technique, a student should not be able to execute it correctly after it is explained to them, given that physical limitations are not doing just that. Of course I understand that not everyone has the flexibility to do a vertical side-kick. But if you then migrate to another style which has a verticle-front kick, there is no reason one should not be able to within a week, tops, to execute the vert front kick as well as the side.

The master form in IKC Kenpo contains every move in the entire system. You learned the system, you've learned that style of kenpo. For the employer I work, to teach their curriculum, I had to learn it in a week. I hate the form, but because of it learned the kenpo system. Am I a master? No. Am I ranked in it? No, but I do still possess my third Dan. Have I incorporated every technique into how I fight? No, but few implement, fluidly, with complete control every technique they know how to do, in a fight.

Once you learn the techniques, you have a lifetime to learn how to perfect them. Hopefully one has chosen a teacher who will be there to correct when necessary, but honestly, with proper explanation, once execute properly and physical limitations are overcome, there is no reason it should not be executed everytime thereafter correctly.

Out of curiosity, how long have you trained in each of these arts that you claim?

The oldest would be Moo Duk Kwan which is 19 years. The most recent would be Xingyi which I began studying 3 months ago. One should never be satisfied with the plateau they reach. Enjoy it, appreciate it, but then move on, grow, and live.

There is also no reason, upon changing or learning a new style, to quit the old. I went 5 years where I refused to do Moo duk Kwan, because of my disgust of TKD. However, I eventually matured and got over that, and practice the styles everyday. The only techniques I've give up were those which turned out to be harmful. When first taught to fall, I was taught to catch by one's wrist. I later learned in another school exactly why that's a terrible idea, when I learned how to fall and mitigate the force with the forearms and ridge of hand. Different techniques, but one will probably someday break my wrist, while the other I've done on every surface I can think of (which wasn't sharp) and haven't gotten any serious injury.

Don't get me wrong, pounding pavement is never fun. But at least I haven't broken anything.
 

K-man

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:s439: I'm not sure for how much longer I can contain myself!
 
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Zenjael

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I hate using this as a measuring stick, but I may have to here. Since the UFC consists of pro fighters, I wonder...how many broken bones from kicks have we seen in MMA? Am I reading this right....you think its absurd if it takes longer than a year to get a BB? Son, you have alot to learn. Any real school will make you train many years before a BB is given.

I would venture to say then that the black belt in that school is ritualized. That's fine, to each school's own philosophy.

But with dedication, one should be able to learn the execution of the techniques in the system within a month, tops, if they were truly committed and devoted their time to it. It only takes, from what I was told, around 500 sequences of a technique for it to become muscle memory, and about 2000 for it to become instinctual response memory.

So that we don't memorize useless clutter, our brains have a technique where they effectively edit out repetitousnous. For example, if you touch your nose and foot at the same time, you feel them simultaneously. However, physically the nerves from your foot take longer to arrive, and as such we should feel a delay, even if minor. The reason we don't, is that the brain edits out that gap.

If one cannot learn, say, the first 100 basic techniques in a system in a month, I would advise them to work on their ability to absorb information and how they train. For most forms, and katas, I need to watch it twice and can emulate it in the style. A lot of people who cross-train in styles eventually find themself able to do this.

I see no reason, with an adequate teacher teaching the technique, a student should not be able to execute it correctly after it is explained to them, given that physical limitations are not doing just that. Of course I understand that not everyone has the flexibility to do a vertical side-kick. But if you then migrate to another style which has a verticle-front kick, there is no reason one should not be able to within a week, tops, to execute the vert front kick as well as the side.

The master form in IKC Kenpo contains every move in the entire system. You learned the system, you've learned that style of kenpo. For the employer I work, to teach their curriculum, I had to learn it in a week. I hate the form, but because of it learned the kenpo system. Am I a master? No. Am I ranked in it? No, but I do still possess my third Dan. Have I incorporated every technique into how I fight? No, but few implement, fluidly, with complete control every technique they know how to do, in a fight.

Once you learn the techniques, you have a lifetime to learn how to perfect them. Hopefully one has chosen a teacher who will be there to correct when necessary, but honestly, with proper explanation, once execute properly and physical limitations are overcome, there is no reason it should not be executed everytime thereafter correctly.

Out of curiosity, how long have you trained in each of these arts that you claim?

The oldest would be Moo Duk Kwan which is 19 years. The most recent would be Xingyi which I began studying 3 months ago. One should never be satisfied with the plateau they reach. Enjoy it, appreciate it, but then move on, grow, and live.

There is also no reason, upon changing or learning a new style, to quit the old. I went 5 years where I refused to do Moo duk Kwan, because of my disgust of TKD. However, I eventually matured and got over that, and practice the styles everyday. The only techniques I've give up were those which turned out to be harmful. When first taught to fall, I was taught to catch by one's wrist. I later learned in another school exactly why that's a terrible idea, when I learned how to fall and mitigate the force with the forearms and ridge of hand. Different techniques, but one will probably someday break my wrist, while the other I've done on every surface I can think of (which wasn't sharp) and haven't gotten any serious injury.

Don't get me wrong, pounding pavement is never fun. But at least I haven't broken anything.

That's just completely wrong. Really. Completely wrong.

When you remove techniques, or alter them, you have created a seperate, but similar school of thought, and thus form of the style.

"Age doesn't matter? I promise you when you are 40, you will look back at your words and think yourself a fool."

The day I withhold anything from anyone because of their age I'll eat my own belt. Agism is bigotry no matter how you look at it, be it young or old. If you were black, or Jewish, or from a different culture, I would not disclude your merit and ability.

You have stated that you are expert in a variety of things

The only thing I have stated to be an expert in is how to wield a knife. Apart from that, no clue what you're on about.

"You've put yourself forward as an expert, and even asked advice of others if you are 'just too darned good' for your students.

And as I recall, you missed the point of the thread entirely, which should probably tell me that you just aren't ready for martial arts on that level. The question was not, 'If I am too awesome' it was if there comes a time for a student, when as the teacher, they no longer are treated the same, and possibly why. I have, and always will consider myself the student. I love to teach, but I have always felt myself the student rather than that.

The thread began with my experience, but was about asking you what you would do in the situation, if others have felt it, and what they did. You twisted it into the conversation being about me being 'too awesome' when that was the exact opposite point I was trying to reinforce.

In all our conversations, you focus on things tangents, and nonissues. If the subject of that thread is im hitting too hard, the answer is obvious, common sense- tone it down. That could have been answered in one reply, and would not require a thread. I could ask my teacher that. You should consider, possibly, that the experience I had, was one I was trying to use to let others know that such things may eventually happen when one transitions from student to teacher, and it is not because they are doing anything wrong. Again, you spent several pages arguing with me about the relevance of age.

That's fine, I don't think age has anything to do with your ability to survive, within reason, if you are trained. A 2 year old might have as hard a time as the 110 year old would.

Even if I was the best martial artist on the world, I'd still find reason to come to a forum like this, and discuss with other martial artists to keep growing.

suggesting that actual masters of their arts who post here should watch your video and learn from it. OMG. No, seriously. OMG. If you were a bit more snide, I'd actually think you meant it as a form of humor, like that Jim Carrey clip! Yeah, you're that bad.

Interesting strawman. I'm very new to this forum- I thought you a grandmaster based off your title. If I have asked any people to watch and learn from my video, well I don't think I have. I've offered the video for others to utilize. If they see me making mistake, I hope they will not do it. Others who have been critical I have told to look closer at the video, that does not mean learn.

But you have not seen me question a person's background to the degree of accusing who has taught them of being fraudulent. And that's insulting enough to get a person banned from some schools.

But that doesn't make you a senior member, it doesn't make your an expert, and your bonafides look to a lot of us like a collection of McDojo junk certificates.

If martial arts was about degree collecting, maybe a snide comment like this would be relevant. Unfortunately, degrees are but commercialized things which exploit a deep spiritual ritualization in martial arts.

A real teacher will wear their belt to keep their pants up. It is not the rank, or belt which is why you should respect a person in martial arts. Who they are is.

I am actually giving you credit for at least possessing the rankings you claim

Honestly, I'd prefer if people ignored my ranking. I certainly do. I threw away the certificates and trophies I had when I moved out of my parents house. What I've learned is in my head, not on a piece of paper.

I've tried using humor to get through to you. I've tried gentle hints, even if they were a bit acerbic or sarcastic.

What was sarcastic to you, came off as entirely vitriolic as you continuously disclude ability for agism, which is a form of bigotry, whether you think it or not.

You may find that the hostility you currently find uncomfortable will become something worse; silence. At that point your opinion moves from absurd and incorrect to irrelevant. Everyone puts you on ignore and you can pontificate to yourself.

To be honest, as you've pointed out you have trained for a paltry time. So have I. But in all our exchanges, never once have you discussed with me the fact that I have more experience than you in the arts. But you see, how condescending that is? That the simple difference of time should have me ignore you. I've been to a school, a very good school, where the black belts often had no idea who the underbelts were. That was the attitude; if you were a beginner, shut up and learn. Watch.

It was not an aspect of the school I enjoyed particularly, not because I had a lot to say, but because it turned rank less into an achievement, and more of a kind of clique entrance to the black belt 'club'.

If people would like to put me on ignore, there is apparently a function to do so. If they find our opinions so averse, and me so rude for giving input, well they're welcome to. I don't really care. If I say something and someone can take something from it, that is my desire.

I don't teach to people who dont want to listen, and I don't learn from teachers who dont desire to teach, but to be correct. I have been accused of a lot of ego-tripping on this board apparently, yet it is ironic that the majority of the people who accuse me of this are lower in rank.

Nothing I have stated on this board has been offensive; so far I have just disagreed with other people about certain things, though you'll find throughout my posts I tend to agree more than not.

But when you say things like this

What you do have is talent, youth and enthusiasm, and those stand you in good stead. As I've said, if you could dial the "I love me" ******** down a couple notches, you'd probably do just fine. I don't think you're a troll, I think you're an egomaniac with maybe a little Asberger's in the mix.

When you suggest to me I suffer from mental instability because we disagree over a martial art you are far less inexperienced in, please forgive me for saying this, but get over yourself. I have been humble, but I do know I am a good martial artist, and if fortune in my favor with many more years to continue to grow. When you are 70 and nearing 30 or over years of training, I will be nearing 50 years and will be just past the age you are now. Please understand when you tout age, experience, as a qualifier, than you might want to give the due respect you demand toward others, from someone who has experience. And believe me, I have been more than patient with how you communicate with me about something I've held more dear in my life than you have. But that is assumption, and one without base. Much like many have made toward me, which were needless.

However, people who care about the art, really, are past superficial things such as age, or clothing. We care about learning, growing, and assisting others in doing so, once our time comes to.

If you can't see past my age at what I do have to offer, it is your loss friend, not mine.

But understand, when it comes to martial arts, the only thing I will take personally is disrespect toward the art, and those individuals who are truly good teachers, and people I respect. When you go beyond questioning the validity of my background, and begin to blanket judge who has trained me, and their own value through that, you have assumed far more than is anyone's right, without actually knowing a person.

The same people you claim I offend have also been the most oft ones to see the deeper messages behind my posts, and can come to an agreement. It is said that if you were to gather all the great masters, they would agree on everything. Gather their students, they wouldn't agree on anything. I see this here- the people who have given me the most negative input, are also those who are loudest in their outspokenness, and limited in their own inexperience.

Sorry, but thats a joke! IMO, I don't believe in giving a BB to anyone under the age of 16. Sure, some schools do a Jr. BB. That, I can agree with to a point. Of course, when they're adults, they need to re-test. But a 13yr old thats a 3rd dan...LMFAO! I'd laugh at the student as well as the teacher! Anyone who does that, is running a mcdojo!

When our student body grew to over 250 at Master Khans, the landlord upped the rent for the location to the point he would have had to have tuition be 200 monthly per student. And we all would have gladly paid it. He chose to retire, and close his school, rather than turn his school into something to earn a profit. I was out of state when this happened, but I heard on the final day over 500 people showed, and it's heartwrenching to hear of people weeping over it, en masse, but that was how much we loved the school.

Every person I've promoted for free, and I only charge when it is necessary to keep a roof over the head where we train.

If you would like to say he ran a Mcdojo, know that he promoted over 200 black belts in his martial arts career. And every single one deserved it, without exception. He had 0 problem failing people for even the smallest reasons. It's why I left an actual Mcdojo school and changed to his. And it saved me as a martial artist.

Why would you retest someone when they have already proven themself? Would you ask your master to retest for his dan, or would you give a martial artist the integrity, and respect they deserve which I am giving to you guys. Which I had thought the norm in martial arts.
 

Chris Parker

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Hmm. Long one.

"First, there's no such thing as "Okinawan Karate" as a ryu."

I agree, and you did not see me saying it was a ryu. In fact I've said the opposite- it's rather undeveloped, and there is a good reason. Okinawan Karate is not tied to a family, or single branch of art. It has drawn from southern style Gongfu elements, combined with south Japanese martial art styles, and finally added to by American military combat training, which was added during our occupation of that land.

However, just because it is a ryu, does not mean whatsoever that it is lacking in techniques specific to a style which can only be found in Okinawa, or by people who have learned from those in the area. You'll find because Okinawan is not a ryu-like style that many claim it is what spread martial arts, and inspired a multitude of styles. I'm not saying that, merely that who I learned from referred to it only as Okinawan Karate, with elements of Shotokan and Tang Soo Do added.

Hmm, firstly, Shotokan isn't Okinawan, it's Japanese, Tang Soo Do is pretty directly the Korean pronunciation of Karate, so neither of those would qualify as even being Okinawan Karate systems. But to the main thrust, just real quick, what is your understanding of what a Ryu is?

I believe actually Master Murray hails from central United States, but I could be incorrect. He spends virtually all his time traveling, and giving seminars.

And even if he DID make it up, I wouldn't have retained its usage if it was a fail art. It works, and it is distinct stylistically from other forms of Karate I have learned, or seen, while retaining core tenets which allow it to still be aligned as karate.

What are the differences and what are the core tenets that "allow it to still be aligned as karate", according to you?

The term 'acujutsu' I have never heard anywhere save from a few people I have trained with, under the same master. All acujutsu is the systemized application of using acupuncture points incorporated into combat. This has existed for as long as acupuncture has been understood.

Look, I'll deal with this in the other thread where you ask a direct question. Suffice to say here that if that's how it was taught to you (with that name), then I have grave doubts as to the veracity of anything that teacher taught you...

That does not mean however that it is not incredibly effective.

I'd be curious as to how you ascertained that.

The turned lion stance I use most often when sparring is my own modification to the bagua stance because of my own unique background. Just because something is innovative, should not disclude its utility. That being said, Okinawan martial arts have existed for some time.

Look, I'm all for tangents and non-sequiteurs, but, uh, what does this have to do with anything discussed here? Your use of your version of a Chinese stance, something about being innovative (hmm, no, not from anything we've seen...), and then stating that Okinawan martial arts have existed for some time? What?

"Second, it's like saying "I was a white belt, and now I'm a green belt, so I know EVERYTHING now.""

As I have said before, if you were the most experienced martial artist, who would you choose to learn from? You NEVER stop growing, and you never have total insight.

Nothing in martial arts comes from you, even if it was you who invented the technique. It was through others you learned the movements to give you the ability to create that technique.

Really? One moment you're talking about your unique background and your innovativeness, now nothing comes from you? Hmm.

And to me, your perception that age is of any relevancy to enlightenment in martial arts, is like saying to someone who breaks cinder blocks they should practice breaking boards more.

The argument is stupid either way- when is breaking either a board or cinderblock condusive toward protecting yourself.

Likewise, how is age relevant when a person can do just that.

There is a Master I have who I respect particularly. As my good training partner Alec put it, what he was looking for from his student was himself. And he promoted only when his standards were met.

We had an individual who received their 4th at 17, and Master Khan would bow to him as respectfully as any master. Because here's the thing- Master Leahy is just that, and a genius at the arts. An absolute genius.

And at 13 when he received his 3rd dan, he was a force to be reckoned with.

Though you may not have encountered such individuals, perhaps it is time for you to step outside the confines of the one school you have attended and see a bit more of the world... through the eyes of a martial artist of course.

I do not claim to be great, to win tournaments, to deserve to be in movies. I have offered explanations for techniques, and stated what I can do with honesty.

Oh dear lord... So experience isn't important? Then why have you been so quick to add to yours?

A genius? According to who? I'm afraid we won't be automatically accepting your appraisal in this instance...

A force to be reckoned with? Let's just say that's highly doubtful... and that, if he was so impressive back then, but you're the "top dog" now (according to your postings here), then you would consider yourself someone to reckon with now... uh, nope.

Step outside the confines of our schools? Oh boy, son, you really don't have much of a clue as to the number of individuals and skill levels we've met and dealt with. You'd really have to do better than that to impress us....

And finally, just because you don't understand the argument (due to lack of experience, maturity, and, well, age... ironically...) doesn't make it stupid. Especially when you're getting it from multiple people who are seeing and saying the same thing.

My students who are 6 years old ask me this question, and I have never answered it with acquiescing their request. If you would like to see how I spar, you can find a video of me on this forum already. I have nothing to prove to you, for I know what I can do, and even if I did show you, what would it prove for me, save that what I said originally was not improper, and was disagreed upon for difference in stylistics. In the end, nothing is solved, and I'm stuck once again in a loop of not being taken at my word- which on a forum for martial artists I find a tad disrespectful.

You may see it as disrespectful, but frankly, your approach here, seeking to school people who are simply your seniors in many ways, claiming expertise in multiple facets, and having a number of highly questionable aspects of your martial arts history, as well as views that are rather incorrect the majority of the time, then dismissing the arguments made against you as "stupid", or irrelevant as your values don't match (the young and inexperienced never think experience matters... funny that), can be seen as rather disrespectful to the membership of the forum here. And the requests for videos are because what you're saying is patently out of whack with reality, and you don't seem to understand that, so we are seeking a way for you to back your claims up. When discussion and argument is valid, such back up is typically within the argument itself... that has not been the case with your posts.

When people discuss self-defense, you do not see me requesting videos of their performance. I have nothing to prove here, just to learn, and share.

The ability to wield knives, or how to shoot a gun, does not necessitate extreme skill in being able to disarm. And wielding and disarming are very different.

Example; in kendo I learned how to weild a shinai, bokken, and katana. It was not until a sifu visiting from Japan instructed our budokai group in kenjutsu that I learned about the guided disarms for Japanese swordwork.

If you would like to see a good palm change, I advise you to look up the teacher Oaktree posted videos of. He is a very gifted teacher and practitioner.

See, it's things like this gigantic error in terminology that has us doubt any actual background (legitimate) for you in such things. And the point isn't for us to see how things like palm changes are done, it's to see what level of understanding you actually have of the concept.

Please do not strawman. My statement was that people who have trained in those styles for that amount of time, normally have the kicks capable of breaking bones. Then again, I think taking over a year to earn the first dan in any (in terms of skill level) to be absurd. I have practiced in both styles for longer than two years, but not long enough for me to particularly say I've specialized in the techniques. Krav Maga is an amalgamation of techniques from different arts, though with the guideline of efficiency stressed. I happen to enjoy krav maga because it focuses on aggression to neutralize an attack, and I've that to work for me.A

Additionally, neither Alec, nor myself utilized muai thai at any point in the footage I chose to keep for the video- that does not mean we have not practiced it. However, you can see in numerous parts of the video krav maga utilized. I believe I also left Muai Thai out because of spacing constraints for what I could tag, but if you'll notice I did include MMA which tends to utilize muai thai. I strongly think it missleading to state we were practicing an art, in the video, when I edited out any techniques were of that style. Seems disingenuous. That being said, if you look at 16.1 seconds to 17 seconds in the video, there is a very clear Muai Thai stance Alec uses. That was the first one I came across, and I am certain there are more, since it is a style he likes a lot more than I do. the only unfortunate side is that his knee injuries keep him from being able to execute their brutal kicks, and hence why he opted to use chung do kwan kicks, when he kicks at all in the video.

Look, I'll deal with your lack of understanding what would actually demonstrate aspects of different martial arts in your video on the other thread, but frankly, this is completely wrong on a large number of counts.

He and I both have a background involving numerous martial arts, and as such, we tend to switch styles a lot.

My apologies for coming off harsh at all, it is getting old fast, the skepticism of people who would find that we agree on a lot of things, and there is little need for the headbutting I feel occurring.

I don't think you actually get why you're getting the responses you are, but the first sentence is part of an indication. It shows that you really don't have any way to back up the arrogance you're coming in with, which is shown in excruciating detail in your video, and telling people who have uniforms older than you that you're an expert while demonstrating no real knowledge can be taken as rather insulting to those who hear it.

Okay, next!

I would venture to say then that the black belt in that school is ritualized. That's fine, to each school's own philosophy.

If you really believe that, and that has been the circumstance under which you have received your dan grades, no wonder your clip was so substandard to the rest of us here.

But with dedication, one should be able to learn the execution of the techniques in the system within a month, tops, if they were truly committed and devoted their time to it. It only takes, from what I was told, around 500 sequences of a technique for it to become muscle memory, and about 2000 for it to become instinctual response memory.

I can pretty much guarantee that I can teach you one of our basics, a simple stepping punch, and even if that's all you have, I'll still be correcting it 5 years down the track. When it comes to the execution of the techniques in my system, well, you'd be dealing with about a thousand, some rather complex, so a month is a little short. Even if we just take the base curriculum, you're still dealing about three to five years worth to get through, and it needs to be done systemically. Oh, and your numbers are completely inaccurate for a range of factors you don't seem to be aware of. In other words, your entire premise here is completely out.

So that we don't memorize useless clutter, our brains have a technique where they effectively edit out repetitousnous. For example, if you touch your nose and foot at the same time, you feel them simultaneously. However, physically the nerves from your foot take longer to arrive, and as such we should feel a delay, even if minor. The reason we don't, is that the brain edits out that gap.

Uh, what? Editing out repetitiousness and editing out gaps in kinesthetic information intake are rather different things... and the brain editing out repetitiousness would actually mean you'd need to do it a hell of a lot more, if the brain keeps editing it out... But what on earth does the nerve impulse delay have to do with anything?

If one cannot learn, say, the first 100 basic techniques in a system in a month, I would advise them to work on their ability to absorb information and how they train. For most forms, and katas, I need to watch it twice and can emulate it in the style. A lot of people who cross-train in styles eventually find themself able to do this.

Good damn luck trying that with my system, son. I couldn't even take you through such an amount of material in a month, let alone you actually learning them, or getting even acceptable with them (there's no way you'd get halfway decent with even one, really). Emulation is nowhere near the same as actually doing (training) it. It's like an impersonation of a famous person... it doesn't mean you have their talent, skills, looks, career, life, or anything else. It means you can shallowly mimic with no actual depth or basis.

I see no reason, with an adequate teacher teaching the technique, a student should not be able to execute it correctly after it is explained to them, given that physical limitations are not doing just that. Of course I understand that not everyone has the flexibility to do a vertical side-kick. But if you then migrate to another style which has a verticle-front kick, there is no reason one should not be able to within a week, tops, to execute the vert front kick as well as the side.

And that is why we say you have no real expertise or understanding of these things, and shouldn't be putting yourself up as a teacher.

The master form in IKC Kenpo contains every move in the entire system. You learned the system, you've learned that style of kenpo. For the employer I work, to teach their curriculum, I had to learn it in a week. I hate the form, but because of it learned the kenpo system. Am I a master? No. Am I ranked in it? No, but I do still possess my third Dan. Have I incorporated every technique into how I fight? No, but few implement, fluidly, with complete control every technique they know how to do, in a fight.

Er, I think you mean "IKCA Kenpo", as IKC is the International Karate Championship, an event, not an organisation. But that's not going to help you much in your argument either, as the IKCA Kenpo group is best described as an abbreviated (cut down, limited) Kenpo system taught primarily by remote video learning. And what the hell, you learnt a form in one week, and you're now teaching this system? That doesn't strike you as odd at all?

And, if your third dan is not in this form of Kenpo, what relevance does it have to your comments?

Once you learn the techniques, you have a lifetime to learn how to perfect them. Hopefully one has chosen a teacher who will be there to correct when necessary, but honestly, with proper explanation, once execute properly and physical limitations are overcome, there is no reason it should not be executed everytime thereafter correctly.

There are a thousand reasons it wouldn't be executed correctly everytime afterwards, Alex.

The oldest would be Moo Duk Kwan which is 19 years. The most recent would be Xingyi which I began studying 3 months ago. One should never be satisfied with the plateau they reach. Enjoy it, appreciate it, but then move on, grow, and live.

By the same token, one shouldn't think that some perceived plateau means any level of skill has been attained... and there can be some hugely detrimental effects on your development if you start other systems without having enough of a basis in what you're doing in the first place.

There is also no reason, upon changing or learning a new style, to quit the old. I went 5 years where I refused to do Moo duk Kwan, because of my disgust of TKD. However, I eventually matured and got over that, and practice the styles everyday. The only techniques I've give up were those which turned out to be harmful. When first taught to fall, I was taught to catch by one's wrist. I later learned in another school exactly why that's a terrible idea, when I learned how to fall and mitigate the force with the forearms and ridge of hand. Different techniques, but one will probably someday break my wrist, while the other I've done on every surface I can think of (which wasn't sharp) and haven't gotten any serious injury.

Don't get me wrong, pounding pavement is never fun. But at least I haven't broken anything.

So your longest studied art you took a five year break from (until you "matured"?) due to "disgust"?

When you remove techniques, or alter them, you have created a seperate, but similar school of thought, and thus form of the style.

Not always. It depends on the reason, and the result. Sometimes it's just a lack of understanding, so it was never the original style in the first place.

The day I withhold anything from anyone because of their age I'll eat my own belt. Agism is bigotry no matter how you look at it, be it young or old. If you were black, or Jewish, or from a different culture, I would not disclude your merit and ability.

Nothing much is being withheld from you, Alex, save some terminology that the site doesn't like us to use... What was being said was along the lines of "youth is wasted on the young" - essentially that it's only due to your lack of maturity, experience, and age that you think such things aren't important in this regard.
The only thing I have stated to be an expert in is how to wield a knife. Apart from that, no clue what you're on about.

You've also intimated that you are teaching, you are the most skilled in your group, you are the senior practitioner, all of which gives you the impression of putting yourself forward as having expertise... but even the direct claim of being an expert in wielding a knife is hard for us to swallow, honestly, especially considering some of the ideas you've put forth regarding knives, facing them, the amount of damage they can do, and how to address a knife-wielding opponent.

And as I recall, you missed the point of the thread entirely, which should probably tell me that you just aren't ready for martial arts on that level. The question was not, 'If I am too awesome' it was if there comes a time for a student, when as the teacher, they no longer are treated the same, and possibly why. I have, and always will consider myself the student. I love to teach, but I have always felt myself the student rather than that.

Then you may want to look at the way you present yourself. Bill was far from alone in the way he read your words.

The thread began with my experience, but was about asking you what you would do in the situation, if others have felt it, and what they did. You twisted it into the conversation being about me being 'too awesome' when that was the exact opposite point I was trying to reinforce.

No, you really didn't put it that way at all. In fact, a quick breakdown of the initial post in the thread in question is as follows:

Para 1 - The other guys in my club don't mess with me... I am the most experienced....

Para 2 - I've coasted for several years (haven't needed to put in much effort)

Para 3 - I'm 22, I've trained for 20 years, I can punch 7 times a second, kick 30 times without putting my foot down.. but I'm humble...

Para 4 - I don't get to spar with people, they avoid me.. if I do spar them, they can't last with me... am I hitting them too hard, or am I just that much better than them?

Para 5 - A teacher told me that I shouldn't beat people up when I spar with them (really, the only paragraph not focused on you)

Para 6 - But I don't do that. I make sure I match them, as I'm always better than they are... in fact, I don't do difficult combinations to plebs...

Para 7 - It's not about being "better" (for me) - although that contradicts the rest of the post, which basically screams "I'm better than them all".

Para 8 - What do you think? Am I hitting too hard, or am I just noticing how much better I am?

As you can see, the entire post was about you, and how awesome you were presenting yourself as being. There was not even an intimation of others having similar experiences.

That's the problem having these posts recorded, it's pretty easy to show where you're wrong that way...

In all our conversations, you focus on things tangents, and nonissues. If the subject of that thread is im hitting too hard, the answer is obvious, common sense- tone it down. That could have been answered in one reply, and would not require a thread. I could ask my teacher that. You should consider, possibly, that the experience I had, was one I was trying to use to let others know that such things may eventually happen when one transitions from student to teacher, and it is not because they are doing anything wrong. Again, you spent several pages arguing with me about the relevance of age.

Re-read the thread.

That's fine, I don't think age has anything to do with your ability to survive, within reason, if you are trained. A 2 year old might have as hard a time as the 110 year old would.

Wow, is that a non-argument, and a way to completely miss the damn point.

Even if I was the best martial artist on the world, I'd still find reason to come to a forum like this, and discuss with other martial artists to keep growing.

Sure... but would anyone be wanting to discuss with you?

Interesting strawman. I'm very new to this forum- I thought you a grandmaster based off your title. If I have asked any people to watch and learn from my video, well I don't think I have. I've offered the video for others to utilize. If they see me making mistake, I hope they will not do it. Others who have been critical I have told to look closer at the video, that does not mean learn.

Really? Let's see... from your initial post in your video thread:

I hope you guys enjoy the video, find valuable insights for possible improvement and critique, and can find things to use yourself from this video.
.....
I am hoping the diversity will allow the video to appeal to many, especially as an example of the benefits of cross-style training.

But no, you weren't suggesting that the membership here, who you don't know the actual backgrounds of, could, or should learn from your video...

But you have not seen me question a person's background to the degree of accusing who has taught them of being fraudulent. And that's insulting enough to get a person banned from some schools.

Well, when a list like yours comes along, with clearly invented aspects, that's a different situation to just jumping on someone without any reason. Something to consider.

If martial arts was about degree collecting, maybe a snide comment like this would be relevant. Unfortunately, degrees are but commercialized things which exploit a deep spiritual ritualization in martial arts.

Oh boy, do you have a clue what you think you mean by that?

A real teacher will wear their belt to keep their pants up. It is not the rank, or belt which is why you should respect a person in martial arts. Who they are is.

Small thing, but a belt in martial arts doesn't hold anything up... as far as the rest, it's true and not true. The rank isn't anything in and of itself (as compared to other arts), and the skill and knowledge is the thing that matters most... but the rank should be indicative of that. It is indicative of experience, knowledge, skill, understanding, insight, and so on. So it's something that does actually mean something, and can certainly be something that garners respect, provided it is lived up to.

Honestly, I'd prefer if people ignored my ranking. I certainly do. I threw away the certificates and trophies I had when I moved out of my parents house. What I've learned is in my head, not on a piece of paper.

Look, I'm going to be blunt. The most common reason that someone starts arguing against the value of rank (after advertising it, and being called out) is due to their own sense of lack of worth, so they justify their status by saying it really doesn't matter... except if it didn't, it wouldn't be used in the first place.

What was sarcastic to you, came off as entirely vitriolic as you continuously disclude ability for agism, which is a form of bigotry, whether you think it or not.

There was no ageism, Alex. There was the observation that it is a relevant detail. You have not been excluded due to your age, but the realities of what your age entails has been commented on. There's no bigotry here, just actual experience showing up on our side of things.

To be honest, as you've pointed out you have trained for a paltry time. So have I. But in all our exchanges, never once have you discussed with me the fact that I have more experience than you in the arts. But you see, how condescending that is? That the simple difference of time should have me ignore you. I've been to a school, a very good school, where the black belts often had no idea who the underbelts were. That was the attitude; if you were a beginner, shut up and learn. Watch.

Not really what has been going on, Alex. Your experience in your arts is one thing, your age and life experience is separate to that, and the level of maturity (of personality) that you have displayed is again separate. You may want to look again at what has been said.

It was not an aspect of the school I enjoyed particularly, not because I had a lot to say, but because it turned rank less into an achievement, and more of a kind of clique entrance to the black belt 'club'.

That happens, and it's something that I'd avoid as well. But it's also beside the point that was being made.

If people would like to put me on ignore, there is apparently a function to do so. If they find our opinions so averse, and me so rude for giving input, well they're welcome to. I don't really care. If I say something and someone can take something from it, that is my desire.

It'd be more to do with the way you take input from others, honestly. But yeah, they'd be free to put you (or anyone else) on ignore, and they may miss out on something because of it. Then again, if you can't take on board what others are saying, leading them to put you on ignore because they don't want to go down the path of giving you the same answers again and again, you may miss out on what they could give you, as they don't hear what you say first. That's kinda the flip side to it that some seem to miss...

I don't teach to people who dont want to listen, and I don't learn from teachers who dont desire to teach, but to be correct. I have been accused of a lot of ego-tripping on this board apparently, yet it is ironic that the majority of the people who accuse me of this are lower in rank.

But more life-experienced and more mature. That's really the key. I think you'll find that they're able to point out such things as they've already gone through similar things themselves (being arrogant, ego-centric, thinking they know it all already), and can recognise it when they see it, even when the person themselves can't. And they're giving you the benefit of that experience, quite generously. Whether you can take that on board is another matter, of course.

But for the record, a large number of those who have seen such things in your posts are older than you, more experienced in martial arts than you, more well-read than you, more knowledgable than you, more insightful than you, have deeper understanding than you, and are equally or higher (in some cases, much higher) ranked than you. So you know.

Nothing I have stated on this board has been offensive; so far I have just disagreed with other people about certain things, though you'll find throughout my posts I tend to agree more than not.

But when you say things like this

When you suggest to me I suffer from mental instability because we disagree over a martial art you are far less inexperienced in, please forgive me for saying this, but get over yourself. I have been humble, but I do know I am a good martial artist, and if fortune in my favor with many more years to continue to grow. When you are 70 and nearing 30 or over years of training, I will be nearing 50 years and will be just past the age you are now. Please understand when you tout age, experience, as a qualifier, than you might want to give the due respect you demand toward others, from someone who has experience. And believe me, I have been more than patient with how you communicate with me about something I've held more dear in my life than you have. But that is assumption, and one without base. Much like many have made toward me, which were needless.

Offensive is in the way it's perceived, Alex. So you may not have intended it, but it may still be present. Oh, and Aspbergers isn't really a mental instability, it's more a condition that affects the way you deal with other people. That wasn't to do with your take on martial arts, it was a comment on the way you present yourself (there are quite a range of cues, by the way, including some very odd and very incorrect repeated usages of language, so you know), so you may want to look at it in context.

When it comes to age and experience as a qualifier, again, look to the context that that is being used in. But I would ask, given some of the systems you claim, what do you have experience in that is to be respected? Hmm. Might be another time when the context of the experience is a valid point to be understood....

However, people who care about the art, really, are past superficial things such as age, or clothing. We care about learning, growing, and assisting others in doing so, once our time comes to.

If you can't see past my age at what I do have to offer, it is your loss friend, not mine.

Actually, Alex, you keep harping on the age thing more than anyone else. Bill (and myself, and others) have pointed out the issues with thinking you know it all at your young age, but you're the one who has kept it going, and taken it as meaning we don't listen to anything you might say, dismissing it due to your age. Not really the case... in fact, the bigger thing we've been saying is that you shouldn't dismiss the years of life experience that are being shown to you, which is something you've been doing. And that, really, makes this all your loss.

But understand, when it comes to martial arts, the only thing I will take personally is disrespect toward the art, and those individuals who are truly good teachers, and people I respect. When you go beyond questioning the validity of my background, and begin to blanket judge who has trained me, and their own value through that, you have assumed far more than is anyone's right, without actually knowing a person.

I really don't think we have, Alex. We've questioned some of the more unusual (read: bizarre) systems and names, but haven't really said much about the people you train with (other than Alec in the clip you provided... mainly as you provided the clip. But even there we kept it focused on you...).

The same people you claim I offend have also been the most oft ones to see the deeper messages behind my posts, and can come to an agreement. It is said that if you were to gather all the great masters, they would agree on everything. Gather their students, they wouldn't agree on anything. I see this here- the people who have given me the most negative input, are also those who are loudest in their outspokenness, and limited in their own inexperience.

I'd be interested to know who you think it is that are your most outspoken critics, and who agrees with you... because I really don't think you've got it the right way around.

When our student body grew to over 250 at Master Khans, the landlord upped the rent for the location to the point he would have had to have tuition be 200 monthly per student. And we all would have gladly paid it. He chose to retire, and close his school, rather than turn his school into something to earn a profit. I was out of state when this happened, but I heard on the final day over 500 people showed, and it's heartwrenching to hear of people weeping over it, en masse, but that was how much we loved the school.

Uh, what does this have to do with a thirteen year old third dan? And how high was the damn rent if a raise to it required 250 people to pay $200 a month, netting $50,000 a month...? Damn, I thought my rent was high...

Every person I've promoted for free, and I only charge when it is necessary to keep a roof over the head where we train.

Good for you. What's the point? Are you trying to say that you're not the product of McDojo's because you don't charge? That's far from the only factor, you know...

If you would like to say he ran a Mcdojo, know that he promoted over 200 black belts in his martial arts career. And every single one deserved it, without exception. He had 0 problem failing people for even the smallest reasons. It's why I left an actual Mcdojo school and changed to his. And it saved me as a martial artist.

Seen the video. You haven't been saved yet, youngster...

Why would you retest someone when they have already proven themself? Would you ask your master to retest for his dan, or would you give a martial artist the integrity, and respect they deserve which I am giving to you guys. Which I had thought the norm in martial arts.

Uh... what on earth does this have to do with anything here?

Oh, and before you say it, being a History major doesn't mean anything in terms of tangents, got no idea where that synapse fire came from in your other thread....
 

Bill Mattocks

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Alex,

I am only going to say a couple of things and then I will move on. I really haven't got time in my life to deal with you. As a 'Mentor' on MT, I try to help keep the peace and make sure new members are welcomed and to smooth the way wherever I can. I've tried to give you the benefit of the doubt and to put myself in your place at your age; I've even looked into your background and seen that you're not a fraud, and I've said so.

You do, however, suffer from massive egotism, as Chris has very aptly pointed out, and you deny even your own words; but they condemn you. If you do not realize that, then there is no argument in the world which is going to reach you; you simply do not accept any criticism as valid that you do not wish to hear.

On the subject of age versus experience versus rank...

I am not an expert martial artist, as I've clearly communicated. I'm sorry if you mistook my 'Grandmaster' title on MT for something it was not, but my profile clearly lists who and what I am, I make no misrepresentations about myself or my abilities (or lack thereof).

However, not being an expert myself does not mean I do not know good karate when I see it. I train under a well-respected sensei with a known lineage only 2 generations from the Soke of Isshin-Ryu. These men and women each have 30 years experience and in some cases, 40. They do good karate, and I know what it looks like. However, I am not qualified to know what is good or bad about other styles, and so I kept my critique of your performance limited to what I do know; such as keeping your head in the well. I even complimented you on your balance and (from my perspective) speed. I also said I saw no Isshin-Ryu techniques in your performance, which you claimed were in there. If they were, they were so poorly executed that I could not recognize them. Again, I don't have to be an expert practitioner to know good from bad Isshin-Ryu. And you asked for feedback. Now you claim you didn't want your techniques criticized, only the video itself? Whatever.

I am older than you by a lot. That means nothing on the dojo floor, but it mean a lot everywhere else, and this (MT) is not the dojo floor. In the dojo, I refer to anyone wearing a black belt as sir or maam, and I refer to all 3rd dans as sensei. That is the tradition of our style, and it is extended to anyone on our dojo floor or in tournament, regardless of style. If I meet a sensei of another style at a tournament, I bow to them (I also get a bow in return). Off the dojo floor, I am your elder. I don't demand your respect, but some offer respect to age anyway. I don't care if you do or do not. I certain respect my elders, most of whom have valuable insight and wisdom to offer me if I care to ask and listen.

Moving on to experience, I think you mistake my admitted lack of experience wearing a gi with a lack of experience in all things martial. Having served my country as a Marine MP, and later in civilian law enforcement, I have experienced actual fights, real brawls, genuine threats with knives and guns, and I've had to suck it up, wade in, and make arrests. I've fought with drunks and wrestled with angry spouses when their assaultive drunk husbands were being arrested. I've been spit on, puked on, bled on, kicked, punched, and attacked with a knife; and it was real, not simulated. It was not in the dojo, not on a tournament floor, in some cases it was life or death. I've delivered a baby and watched people die in front of my eyes, their blood, guts, and in some cases, their brains all over me. I may not spend a lot of time talking about it on MT, because this isn't the place for that and I don't particularly relish reliving the details. Suffice to say, my life experience is the genuine article. You may live to gather that kind of experience too, but you don't have it now, and nothing you've ever done compares to my experiences.

You say you've been mugged twice, but refuse to supply details. I can tell you hair-raising stories about fighting a drunk whose buddy tried to stab me with his bayonet while I wrestled on the ground with his partner in the Mojave desert. I can tell you about trying to stop a guy from breaking my arm over a pipe rail while he kicked me in the nads, I ended up breaking HIS arm, and if you've ever done it (which you have not), you'd know that it's a lot harder than it seems on paper. That remark about kicking a guy's knife hand and breaking his arm; what a hoot. I had to jump on my guy's arm to break it; 190 pounds straight down onto an arm propped over a pipe rail. I know what it feels and sounds like. I know what blood, guts, and bile smell like. I know what very dead human bodies smell like. I know what a corpse feels like when you try to get a pulse. That's experience; the kind that counts. What I learn in the dojo is applied to my lifetime of experiences fighting and THAT, my young friend, is more than you could possibly imagine. Your condescending remarks that perhaps I just don't have enough experience to understand you is laughable. Son, I was knocking people out cold and dragging them out the door by their stacking swivels before you were born; literally.

As to my insistence that you claim expertise you haven't got and your denials that you claim such. I think Chris has very accurately pointed out your flawed statements where you do in fact claim such expertise, though you deny it when criticized. As well, your 3rd Dan ranking makes you an expert from the point of view of martial arts, so if you list it as your qualification, well, you'd better be an expert. I watched your video, I did not see a high degree of expertise. I'm sorry, that's my opinion. And it's not based on a personal like or dislike of you. I said at the beginning that I thought you were a highly intelligent young man with great potential and that you may well be a great martial artist in 20 years, given your dedication and enthusiasm. If you ask for honest feedback, you get it. You don't like it, and interpret it as a personal attack. The only thing I have to say about you personally is that I don't care for your attitude much at all.

And I think that is that, Alex. Good luck to you. As I said, in time you will look back at your younger self and feel embarrassed that you acted the ***. I know I did, and do. It's not like we haven't been where you are now. At your age, no one could tell me anything. I was an insufferable prick. Now people can generally at least put up with me, and I realize how little I know about many things. I wish you an interesting life.
 
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Zenjael

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Really? One moment you're talking about your unique background and your innovativeness, now nothing comes from you? Hmm.

Any technique one creates, is based upon one's learning and experience gained from others.

Oh dear lord... So experience isn't important? Then why have you been so quick to add to yours?

A genius? According to who? I'm afraid we won't be automatically accepting your appraisal in this instance...

A force to be reckoned with? Let's just say that's highly doubtful... and that, if he was so impressive back then, but you're the "top dog" now (according to your postings here), then you would consider yourself someone to reckon with now... uh, nope.

Step outside the confines of our schools? Oh boy, son, you really don't have much of a clue as to the number of individuals and skill levels we've met and dealt with. You'd really have to do better than that to impress us....

And finally, just because you don't understand the argument (due to lack of experience, maturity, and, well, age... ironically...) doesn't make it stupid. Especially when you're getting it from multiple people who are seeing and saying the same thing.

This is the last part of the post I'm responding to, and this is why; you are putting words in my mouth, which I do not believe. I have never said experience is not important, it is moreso than even training and learning the techniques. Age does not equate to this. I did not say I was 'top dog' in any post. My respect for Master Leahy is as high now as it was when I last saw him 5 years ago. If you do not think I have the ability to recognize ability, or worth in the art of others, than I have no reason to speak with you. Your view of me is such that I cannot see, and you cannot make the blind see.

But that being said, what you see as blindness for me, I in turn am seeing in you.

Your words are of worth, and quality, but they are missapropriated because you do not understand who I am. That is fine, but it also means that considering you have a view of me, which isn't me, and are entrenched in a mindset of... telling me who I am, I have no reason to give you input anymore. It is apparent in your post you have decided that I know it all, consider myself the best, feel everyone should learn from me, and that experience is nonessential. You seem to be quite happy to conjure your own, and opt it as my epistemology.

The problem is, those aren't my views, and as I cannot seem to convince you of that, I am not going to waste effort attempting to do so. It has not seemed to occur to those on the board, that to go to other people and ask to learn from them, is to first humble oneself and admit one's own ignorance of what they know, and to admit you would like to learn from them. I don't learn so I can be the best, I learn so I can enjoy the art.


To Bill; your words contain much worth, in that they are strong in their ability to empathize with the reader. It is how it is easy to relate, and agree with you, when even we still have differing opinions.

Moving on to experience, I think you mistake my admitted lack of experience wearing a gi with a lack of experience in all things martial. Having served my country as a Marine MP, and later in civilian law enforcement, I have experienced actual fights, real brawls, genuine threats with knives and guns, and I've had to suck it up, wade in, and make arrests. I've fought with drunks and wrestled with angry spouses when their assaultive drunk husbands were being arrested. I've been spit on, puked on, bled on, kicked, punched, and attacked with a knife; and it was real, not simulated. It was not in the dojo, not on a tournament floor, in some cases it was life or death. I've delivered a baby and watched people die in front of my eyes, their blood, guts, and in some cases, their brains all over me. I may not spend a lot of time talking about it on MT, because this isn't the place for that and I don't particularly relish reliving the details. Suffice to say, my life experience is the genuine article. You may live to gather that kind of experience too, but you don't have it now, and nothing you've ever done compares to my experiences.

Please do not ever mistake me for not considering age of value in its own respects. Your life experiences are intrinsic, and influential in everything who you are today. I would never disclude another's life experiences. I am sorry you had to deal with that, but I know also from your posts it has made you a stronger person, and that is the important thing to draw from age. Everyone experiences a life with suffering, and some are misfortunate to experience it more than others, and situations which could harm them. But I do not think age should be a factor in martial arts, where I've seen people discluded by others because of their age, when those very people should have been on their knees asking to learn from the young individual.

However, not being an expert myself does not mean I do not know good karate when I see it. I train under a well-respected sensei with a known lineage only 2 generations from the Soke of Isshin-Ryu. These men and women each have 30 years experience and in some cases, 40. They do good karate, and I know what it looks like. However, I am not qualified to know what is good or bad about other styles, and so I kept my critique of your performance limited to what I do know; such as keeping your head in the well. I even complimented you on your balance and (from my perspective) speed. I also said I saw no Isshin-Ryu techniques in your performance, which you claimed were in there. If they were, they were so poorly executed that I could not recognize them. Again, I don't have to be an expert practitioner to know good from bad Isshin-Ryu. And you asked for feedback. Now you claim you didn't want your techniques criticized, only the video itself? Whatever.

Here is the thing, I would consider you an expert. You have the insight of someone with demonstrable knowledge of the art, in a way which can be understood by others from different systems. I would love my techniques critiqued, that was not the issue. The issue is that the focus was not on techniques, but in misunderstanding what was watched, telling me what I should do, without regard to who I am, and that the people who taught me were fraudulent, among others.

I posted the video for the entertainment of martial artists on the board, but also because I joined this board thinking that it was a place where martial artists came together, and everyone learned from each other. This is why I have spoken of others learning from me here, not that they should, but that if there was something of merit, somewhere in what I write, that I hope it helps them.

You say you've been mugged twice, but refuse to supply details. I can tell you hair-raising stories about fighting a drunk whose buddy tried to stab me with his bayonet while I wrestled on the ground with his partner in the Mojave desert. I can tell you about trying to stop a guy from breaking my arm over a pipe rail while he kicked me in the nads, I ended up breaking HIS arm, and if you've ever done it (which you have not), you'd know that it's a lot harder than it seems on paper. That remark about kicking a guy's knife hand and breaking his arm; what a hoot. I had to jump on my guy's arm to break it; 190 pounds straight down onto an arm propped over a pipe rail. I know what it feels and sounds like. I know what blood, guts, and bile smell like. I know what very dead human bodies smell like. I know what a corpse feels like when you try to get a pulse. That's experience; the kind that counts. What I learn in the dojo is applied to my lifetime of experiences fighting and THAT, my young friend, is more than you could possibly imagine. Your condescending remarks that perhaps I just don't have enough experience to understand you is laughable. Son, I was knocking people out cold and dragging them out the door by their stacking swivels before you were born; literally.

When I speak of experience, I speak of more than first hand existance through events. I speak also of deeper insight behind those events experienced. It is not enough to have done, but to also understand. As I have said earlier, every person in life has struggles. You chose a career path, and life which placed you in the path of events which you consider experience, as any should. Never forget that if you are witness to such things as those, it is also because of who you are intrinsically. And people like you are needed, for their own services to society.

But you speak of me not going into detail of the altercations in my past. Why should I? Many have gone through life struggles of far more severity and difficulty than I did, and were affected much more by consequence. I do not see those experiences in a pleasant light, because my own reaction in at least one I am not happy with. There were great consequences from them as well. I am finding it difficult not to express what I would like to say because I do not particularly desire to speak about those events. Suffice to say one resulted with me having sustained a stabbing, having stabbed another with their own knife, and knocked the other assailant unconscious. What ashames me, is that I stood over the other and strongly considered putting the knife in him as well, for there was a very strong... something told me not to do so would be wrong. But I didn't. I later would learn that the individual, once 18 and released, raped a person and landed back in jail. When I was 18 I had to bear the casket of a close friend who committed suicide. I have supervised territorial disputes by drug dealers, and witnessed multiple deaths as well. NOVA has a pretty bad underground, when one actually looks. I have been paid to hurt people, and to defend. I have since chosen to mitigate, rather than confront. It's partially why after my bachelor's in history is complete this semester I will be returning to earn a degree in conflict resolutions My experiences however are my own, and others have experienced much more, and less, in both less and greater amount of time than I have been alive. Each person's past is their own, and what they choose to glean from it is up to the individual. I would never disclude another's past, but neither would I disclude them for an objective measure of passing events in causality rather than what they have actually EXPERIENCED.

I have a friend in a permanent vegetative state due to a motorcycle accident. When he is 80 years old, he will still have only had the experienced of a 20 year old, and that is what I speak of as being the importance of experience over age.

If you ask for honest feedback, you get it. You don't like it, and interpret it as a personal attack. The only thing I have to say about you personally is that I don't care for your attitude much at all.

I care for honest feedback which is condusive for either me, or the other to grow as a martial artist. It is not a matter of disliking, it is a matter that the wrong issues are being focused upon, which is obscuring the real reason for posting messages. I simply don't care for comments which focus on the superficial, rather than what actually should be discussed.At your age, no one could tell me anything.

At your age, no one could tell me anything.

Though it is ironic to write these words in response to this statement, this is where you and I are different. I believe one has something to learn from everyone, always. One just needs to see it. I do not carry great doubt, but I do second guess. I have had others review some of these threads, specifically so that I might know if I am missing something, or how I could improve it. Or how to interpret responses otherwise.

You are assuming, because of my age, that I discount the input of others. Age is important, but only in determining the length of time you have existed. We both, since post one, have agreed on the same thing, and I fail to understand why you see that. Ultimately the relevance of age to you is experience, and we both have acknowledged that it is this which is what ultimately conveys ability, in everything who one is. But we have also acknowledged experience is not related to age, but rather what one encounters. Some people have much more active lives. In the end, we both agree that it is experience which is the determinant factor in the quality of an individual.

My life experiences only validate who I am, they are not something I could ever express to you in a way that they have impacted me, just as there is no way you could have me feel, as you did, what you experienced. That is to each their own, and only them. But it does ultimately determine who we are and what we do.

I feel you have read the majority of my posts through a lens which gives a check minus to any remark I say specifically because I am younger. It was funny, but when speaking of this with Master Khan last evening he told me I should have listed I was 40, or no age at all. I think he is right.

But I also think I should express who I am, and I have done so. Not once on this board have I claimed to be superior to any other, you claim of egotism is true, but you have completely misread who I am, my intentions, and because of that, what I am trying to communicate. And I take responsibility for that.
 

jks9199

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But you speak of me not going into detail of the altercations in my past. Why should I? Many have gone through life struggles of far more severity and difficulty than I did, and were affected much more by consequence. I do not see those experiences in a pleasant light, because my own reaction in at least one I am not happy with. There were great consequences from them as well. I am finding it difficult not to express what I would like to say because I do not particularly desire to speak about those events. Suffice to say one resulted with me having sustained a stabbing, having stabbed another with their own knife, and knocked the other assailant unconscious. What ashames me, is that I stood over the other and strongly considered putting the knife in him as well, for there was a very strong... something told me not to do so would be wrong. But I didn't. I later would learn that the individual, once 18 and released, raped a person and landed back in jail. When I was 18 I had to bear the casket of a close friend who committed suicide. I have supervised territorial disputes by drug dealers, and witnessed multiple deaths as well. NOVA has a pretty bad underground, when one actually looks. I have been paid to hurt people, and to defend. I have since chosen to mitigate, rather than confront..

:BSmeter:


Kid, you're full of it. Yes, there are bad places in Northern Virginia. There are bad people in Northern Virginia. They'd eat you alive. Nothing I've seen from you suggests you'd even slow 'em down. And, by the way, the "bad underground" of Northern VA isn't all that bad compared to even Anacostia.
 
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