Tae Kwon Do and R.O.K. Marines

ellies

Yellow Belt
Joined
Feb 9, 2008
Messages
28
Reaction score
3
I have heard all kinds of views and opinions concerning Tae Kwon Do. It always end the same way with my friends, they say something and their lack of knowledge leads them to become a practitioner of the art. Over and over again I listen to critics, most who have never practiced a martial art until MMA came around and the "discovery" of Brazilian Jujistsu. Now all of these "masters" piont their fingers at TKD and say......"Thats not really a martial art, it's a sport"! Recently a good friend of mine, and former R.O.K. Marine was invited to attend a Brazilian Jujistsu training session. One of the instructor noted that when he walked in the room that he was a trained soldier, and remarked to one of his students who'd belittle him earlier " Look before you leap!" The young student approached my friend and asked him if he'd ever practiced martial art before, and he replied "Yes Tae Kwon Do and Hapkido" the young man disrespectfully laughed in his face. The instructor offered an apology, but the damage was done according to the young man. "Tae Kwon Do?, that aint no martial art!!" My friend replied; "I will give you three chances to take me down, and if you do I leave. They young man realized quickly he'd bite off more than he could chew. The instructor told my friend he was welcome anytime, and the young apologized after he regained conscienous some time later. Saying BBJ is worthless would start a commotion greater the fall of the Berlin Wall, so why do folks think it okay to do the same with TKD. I practice both and have a fond respect of all martial arts, never putting down one or the other. All we are asking for is the respect that is do, for after all the Republic of Korea Marine Corps can't be wrong and they've beenat it for some time!!
 

Twin Fist

Grandmaster
Joined
Mar 22, 2008
Messages
7,185
Reaction score
210
Location
Nacogdoches, Tx
Olympic style


thats all you need to know

ROK marines dont do Olympic style, the guys that got creamed at the Gracies? they did.
 

exile

To him unconquered.
Lifetime Supporting Member
MTS Alumni
Joined
Sep 7, 2006
Messages
10,665
Reaction score
251
Location
Columbus, Ohio
I have heard all kinds of views and opinions concerning Tae Kwon Do. It always end the same way with my friends, they say something and their lack of knowledge leads them to become a practitioner of the art. Over and over again I listen to critics, most who have never practiced a martial art until MMA came around and the "discovery" of Brazilian Jujistsu. Now all of these "masters" piont their fingers at TKD and say......"Thats not really a martial art, it's a sport"! Recently a good friend of mine, and former R.O.K. Marine was invited to attend a Brazilian Jujistsu training session. One of the instructor noted that when he walked in the room that he was a trained soldier, and remarked to one of his students who'd belittle him earlier " Look before you leap!" The young student approached my friend and asked him if he'd ever practiced martial art before, and he replied "Yes Tae Kwon Do and Hapkido" the young man disrespectfully laughed in his face. The instructor offered an apology, but the damage was done according to the young man. "Tae Kwon Do?, that aint no martial art!!" My friend replied; "I will give you three chances to take me down, and if you do I leave. They young man realized quickly he'd bite off more than he could chew. The instructor told my friend he was welcome anytime, and the young apologized after he regained conscienous some time later. Saying BBJ is worthless would start a commotion greater the fall of the Berlin Wall, so why do folks think it okay to do the same with TKD. I practice both and have a fond respect of all martial arts, never putting down one or the other. All we are asking for is the respect that is do, for after all the Republic of Korea Marine Corps can't be wrong and they've beenat it for some time!!

Ellies, no one respects the CQ combat content of TKD more than I; I've posted many times on the use the ROK marines and special commando units made of their skill in the art to intimidate their Communist enemiesand worse than intimidatein the Korean War, and at Tra Binh Dong and other venues during the Vietnam War. The ROK soldiers were feared by the Viet Cong for their hand-to-hand combat skills, and rightly so.

But they trained TKD in a way that is almost unheard of in North America. It's not the art itself that people are disrespecting (whether they know it or not), it's the competitive sport training which has almost no relationship to street combat. That's the problem...
 

Deaf Smith

Master of Arts
Joined
Apr 25, 2008
Messages
1,722
Reaction score
85
I've been under three Korean Grand Masters. Two were ex-military. The current one, for over 16 years, was a ROK in Vietnam. He once killed a NVA when they overran the bridge his unit was guarding. He killed that one with the RT handset beating him to death with it.

The founder of the ITF, General Choi Hong Hi, tested my teacher for 2nd dan in Korea. From what he has told me, the ROK army was very very PT orientated and had very serious views on H2H.

You can get any martial art, put a bunch of artificial rules that force emphsis on one particular aspect and you will twist that art into a game. You can get that same art, make it a McDojo with black belts in 1 and 1/2 year and no sweat and make that art a farce.

That does not mean the art is bad, nor the methods of that art are bad. Just those who twisted the art. And a shame on them.

Deaf
 

hkfuie

Purple Belt
Joined
Apr 20, 2008
Messages
371
Reaction score
23
Location
USA
I am old school TKD. Sometimes I wish i could call my art by another name because I feel what I do is so different from sport style.

But some of my best friends are WTF. And I know of no one who physically trains harder that these guys. They hit hard, spar hard, and they have their own reasons for doing things the way they do them.

I think to talk trash about Olympic style is unfortunate. I am going to let other people do what they do, I am going to do what I do.

In all honesty, I have faced so much crap from people about TKD. I have been treated with disrespect from martial artists that I had respected, so much so that for a while I did not want to tell anyone I was TKD.

But then I decided to embrace it. I welcome it. Go ahead and dismiss me in your mind if you want to. I know who I am. I know my training. Gives me an advantage.

I then started training in jujitsu and everyone in that place has been noting but respectful since I have been there. These guys are big MMA fans and most have BBs in another style. The students there tell me that they would like to learn TKD, they ask me questions, as well as ask questions of the other TKDists there. They ask me to show them kicks and strikes.

From this new experience I have learned that it is all about the quality of the people you surround yourself with. Not the quality of the martial arts, the quality of the humans. Respect is a human thing. Should not matter rank or style.
 

terryl965

<center><font size="2"><B>Martial Talk Ultimate<BR
MTS Alumni
Joined
Apr 9, 2004
Messages
41,259
Reaction score
340
Location
Grand Prairie Texas
Ellies, no one respects the CQ combat content of TKD more than I; I've posted many times on the use the ROK marines and special commando units made of their skill in the art to intimidate their Communist enemiesand worse than intimidatein the Korean War, and at Tra Binh Dong and other venues during the Vietnam War. The ROK soldiers were feared by the Viet Cong for their hand-to-hand combat skills, and rightly so.

But they trained TKD in a way that is almost unheard of in North America. It's not the art itself that people are disrespecting (whether they know it or not), it's the competitive sport training which has almost no relationship to street combat. That's the problem...

Exile I too have posted so many threads about the combat effectivness of TKD, but to many time people just do not see enough of it. I have been told by more than a few what I teach is not TKD. I guess all these years later and I still teach the same as before with a few new tricks added in.
 

exile

To him unconquered.
Lifetime Supporting Member
MTS Alumni
Joined
Sep 7, 2006
Messages
10,665
Reaction score
251
Location
Columbus, Ohio
But some of my best friends are WTF. And I know of no one who physically trains harder that these guys. They hit hard, spar hard, and they have their own reasons for doing things the way they do them.

I think to talk trash about Olympic style is unfortunate. I am going to let other people do what they do, I am going to do what I do.

hkf, no one is talking trash about Olympic style, I don't think. And no one is disputing how hard athletes whose sport is Olympic-style TKD train. The problem is at a different level: it's the identification in much of the public mind, and in much of the TKD world, of that particular version of TKD with the whole of TKD&#8212;including the hand-to-hand, civilian self-defense version whose motives, strategic view and tactical application are vastly different from the ring competitive version that your friends practice. What you're seeing here is a response from people who are rejecting, in admittedly very strong terms, the equating of these two things, and who are stressing the value and equal claim to TKD-hood of the SD side, which is so seriously neglected, or ignored outright, in the majority of dojangs.

I don't think anyone intends to demean anyone else in any of this. But for people who believe that combat-effective TKD is in danger of becoming a lost art, there is a certain urgency in proclaiming that, as much as people want to believe that the sport side is the whole story, it just ain't so, and that people need to keep firmly in mind the distinction between these two vastly different takes on the art.
 
Last edited:

Deaf Smith

Master of Arts
Joined
Apr 25, 2008
Messages
1,722
Reaction score
85
But for people who believe that combat-effective TKD is in danger of becoming a lost art, there is a certain urgency in proclaiming that, much as people want to believe that the sport side is the whole story, it just ain't so, and that people need to keep firmly in mind the distinction between these two vastly different takes on the art.

Exactly.

The Olympic side of TKD has it's uses. Even the PR side has increased TKD's visibility among the populance alot. And the kicking techniques I feel do have some uses and one of my friends, also a 5th dan, is now practicing them to add to his arsenal (and he has many of them!)

BUT, it has alot of people thinking TKD = Olympic sparring, which is like BJJ = World Championship Wrestling (but I admit, the Olympic TKD is not faked like WCW.)

And that is the problem.

That and McDojos.

McDojos remind me of how they made instant shake-n-bake sargents in Vietnam. Sped up the process and cut out the fine points. No field experience, no time in grade.

Ask alot of those instant black belts to name all the basic movements in Korean and they would give you a blank stare. Mention the fine points of each of the tenants and they would ask you what was a tenant. And an awful lot of them can't demonstrate a really good kick. Any kick.

I'm not demanding every candidate for black belt be able to do back flips or do any dare-devil stunts, but still it's awful watered down in some places.

And most importantly, if standards are low, or ideals lost, then it's no more than a mail ordered degree.

Deaf
 

terryl965

<center><font size="2"><B>Martial Talk Ultimate<BR
MTS Alumni
Joined
Apr 9, 2004
Messages
41,259
Reaction score
340
Location
Grand Prairie Texas
Well I teach Olympic style for those that wish it along side there other aspect of TKD, Hell my son is trying to make it to the Olympics in WYF srtle of fighting it goes have it place along side of other sports.
 

BrandonLucas

3rd Black Belt
Joined
Dec 31, 2007
Messages
902
Reaction score
41
I really think the situation can be cleared up with 2 viewpoints:

1) How you train, and how how hard you work at that training

2) The intent of the use of the techniques taught in the training

If you really stop and take a look at those 2 viewpoints, you should know what side of the fence you're on...either the SD side or the sport side.

I'm not casting judgement on either side at this point...I think both sides have their place, and at one time, they both shared the same aspects.

If only the 2 sides could come together once again....
 

matt.m

Senior Master
Joined
May 16, 2006
Messages
2,521
Reaction score
121
Location
St. Louis
I've been under three Korean Grand Masters. Two were ex-military. The current one, for over 16 years, was a ROK in Vietnam. He once killed a NVA when they overran the bridge his unit was guarding. He killed that one with the RT handset beating him to death with it.

The founder of the ITF, General Choi Hong Hi, tested my teacher for 2nd dan in Korea. From what he has told me, the ROK army was very very PT orientated and had very serious views on H2H.

You can get any martial art, put a bunch of artificial rules that force emphsis on one particular aspect and you will twist that art into a game. You can get that same art, make it a McDojo with black belts in 1 and 1/2 year and no sweat and make that art a farce.

That does not mean the art is bad, nor the methods of that art are bad. Just those who twisted the art. And a shame on them.

Deaf

I could not agree more. Hapkido gets watered down and so does judo. It happens everywhere in every art. That is why it all comes down to the individual instructor at the end of the day to ensure integrity.
 

Deaf Smith

Master of Arts
Joined
Apr 25, 2008
Messages
1,722
Reaction score
85
Well I teach Olympic style for those that wish it along side there other aspect of TKD, Hell my son is trying to make it to the Olympics in WYF srtle of fighting it goes have it place along side of other sports.


Terry,

I'm not griping at Olympic TKD in itself. I'd prefer they just call it Olympic Kwon Do (OKD) and leave TKD out of it.

I mean it. Teach a new art called Olympic Kwon Do (OKD). Even forms that emphasize kicking to a degree not seen anywhere else. Forms, footwork, sparring methods, even self-defense using the feet far more than the hands. I've seen people who could really use their feet and that would be just their style to train in.

But TKD, like Hapkido, or Shotokan, or Ju-Jitsu, and other arts, should more or less stay as fighting arts and not be confusing to others.

Deaf
 

zDom

Senior Master
Joined
Aug 21, 2006
Messages
3,081
Reaction score
110
Terry,

I'm not griping at Olympic TKD in itself. I'd prefer they just call it Olympic Kwon Do (OKD) and leave TKD out of it.

I mean it. Teach a new art called Olympic Kwon Do (OKD). Even forms that emphasize kicking to a degree not seen anywhere else. Forms, footwork, sparring methods, even self-defense using the feet far more than the hands. I've seen people who could really use their feet and that would be just their style to train in.

But TKD, like Hapkido, or Shotokan, or Ju-Jitsu, and other arts, should more or less stay as fighting arts and not be confusing to others.

Deaf


You probably mean "OTD" as the Tae is the kicking part and the Kwan is the punching part ;)

As for me, I just wish there were more folk like Terry out there involved in the game.

It should be a game for people who do taekwondo, not a game that (mostly) excludes those who do traditional taekwondo because they aren't training in the art of exploiting the rules well enough.
 

Tez3

Sr. Grandmaster
Supporting Member
Joined
Oct 13, 2006
Messages
27,608
Reaction score
4,901
Location
England
I had a soldier come in Thursday to see what we do, he'd just been posted in and was looking for somewhere to train. He's a blackbelt TKD and I was thinking while I explained to him what we do (MMA) that he may feel uncomfortable with our level of training and contact but he said he'd trained to spar full contact albeit with protection and was quite happy to train with us. He said his sparring was little different from ours in intensity, just a bit different in stances (we use a wide stance to avoid takedowns) and distances I think it shows there's still TKD instructors out there who are teaching a real art in terms many of us understand.
I think he's going to be a great asset to the club.... when he comes back in February after three months skiing in Norway! All right for some!
 

Deaf Smith

Master of Arts
Joined
Apr 25, 2008
Messages
1,722
Reaction score
85
You probably mean "OTD" as the Tae is the kicking part and the Kwan is the punching part ;)

As for me, I just wish there were more folk like Terry out there involved in the game.

It should be a game for people who do taekwondo, not a game that (mostly) excludes those who do traditional taekwondo because they aren't training in the art of exploiting the rules well enough.

OTD just does not have the right ring to it ZDom. Sounds like a drug overdose.

Or maybe call it Extreme TKD (ETKD). Might even make it more popular, like World Extreme Cagefighting (though I hasten to admit I'm am no fan to WEC.)

Deaf
 

MasterWright

Purple Belt
Joined
Dec 18, 2006
Messages
308
Reaction score
5
Location
Guelph, Ontario, Canada
I'm not sure how the system works in the US but I'm sure that the Armed Forces personel are trained well.

When we attend the tournaments,sometimes the army team is there. Some of them are on the Canadian team. I know that they train for 4 hours each day in the sport they choose and it shows. They are the ones to beat.
 

hkfuie

Purple Belt
Joined
Apr 20, 2008
Messages
371
Reaction score
23
Location
USA
hkf, no one is talking trash about Olympic style, I don't think. And no one is disputing how hard athletes whose sport is Olympic-style TKD train.


Exile, I was talking about the guys in the original story, not the guys here on this site. :)
 

exile

To him unconquered.
Lifetime Supporting Member
MTS Alumni
Joined
Sep 7, 2006
Messages
10,665
Reaction score
251
Location
Columbus, Ohio
Exile, I was talking about the guys in the original story, not the guys here on this site. :)

Gotcha, hkf!
icon14.gif
 
Top