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Franc0

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The guy is doing some form of Wing Chun/Ving Tsun. I wouldn't say weight training is the reason for his speed. His relaxed execution could be argued as both a method towards that speed, yet detrimental when it comes to power.

Franco
 
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hixxy

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so he wouldnt actually be able to do any damage with that,its more distracting than anything else?​
 

still learning

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Hello, Reminds me of the Speed man! Who could hit you 18 times in one second! got his video.....awsome stuffs.

....and he can hit hit you with power on every strike too!

Speed: things done very fast. AT 100 mile per hour this may seem fast, but if someone it traveling at 200 miles per hour, the 100 miles per hour will seem slow?

If this is true? I can hit you very fast....compare to UM? ...raising vegetables? ..........Aloha
 
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hixxy

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but to hit someone hard you have to tense which will slow you down tho

so punching that fast he must be relaxing therefor theres no power in those strikes
 

rutherford

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Not as a comment on the video, but in general being tense causes antagonistic muscle drag - which robs you of speed AND power.

Being relaxed allows you to hit harder.

Hmm. I've seen this video recently. Does anybody else recognize its source?
 

still learning

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Hello, About tense up? Only on impact/near impact you tense up!

Off course the more relax you are ..the more power and speed can be made. BUT you will need to tense up upon impact.

Right? or do you hit someone in a relax punch? When adrenline kicks in...how many of us will feel relax? while facing someone who is larger and about to hit you and us not wanting to get into a fight?

When you get into a car accident? Do you feel relax when hit? When you almost fall off the ladder? do you still feel relax?

Relaxing in a fight is not something we all can do....because it is something we are not face on a regular basis.

Even Mac the Animal Macyoung as a bouncer always says he gets a little the adrenline response in his body...but experience usually kicks in automatic when you do it many times, on the job as a bouncer.

Just my thoughts and ...................Aloha
 

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The guy is not hitting with any power at all. If I was there I would be a crash punch dummy to prove it, but unfortunately I'm not.
You are not going to get any power out of your punches like that. You have to tense up and the end which will slow it down a little. I think this guy has the potential to hit very hard with single and two hit combos, but beyond that its just show. I wish I could prove it.
Ever seen the show mith busters? I'd like to start one called martial busters. And I'd be the target.
 

FearlessFreep

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I think the idea being put forth is that you have to relax as the strike goes forward in order to get the needed speed but then tense on impact so that the energy goes into the target and not back into your self. If you are tense through the whole range of motion, you can't strike fast. If you are still loose when you connect, you don't get any power into the target
 

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My 2 cents worth:

1. Muhammed Ali was incredibily fast. I doubt he ever touched a barbell.

2. Fast as he was, he also had a heckuva lot of knockouts. Speed and power are not mutually exclusive. Speed amplifies power exponentially.

3. A major reason for Ali's speed was the fact that he was always relaxed. Doesn't take much observation of his films to see that.

4. The guy in the video probably isnt generating a lot of power primarily because his hips are stationary during the strikes. His arms are creating 100% of whatever power he is generating, which will be sub-optimal.

5. Most of his strikes are to the brachial plexus area of his uke, an area that is quite vulnerable and can be effectively attacked without the need for a lot of power.

6. I disagree that you must consciously tense up at impact. If you are relaxed (not limp, just relaxed) through the motion of the strike, at the instant your hand touches your target, specific nerves in your hand
will "fire" involuntarily, sending an impulse to your brain, which will send an impulse back to your hand, instantly creating all the tension you need to transfer the energy from your hand to your subject efficiently. It happens instantaneously and involuntarily. Relaxation through the strike will maximize
speed, which inherently will maximize power.
 

barriecusvein

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hixxy said:
how the hell is this guy so fast,would you say he must just do weights?

also what is he practising,which art?
He is fast because he is relaxed, so his muscles are not competing with each other and hence slowing him down. Weight training will not give you speed like this. Typically, lifting lots of weights builds tension in the muscles, as to lift a weight you must tense the muscle a lot. The muscle gets used to this tense state.

He is most likely practising Wing Chun.

DeLamar.J said:
The guy is not hitting with any power at all. If I was there I would be a crash punch dummy to prove it, but unfortunately I'm not.
You are not going to get any power out of your punches like that. You have to tense up and the end which will slow it down a little. I think this guy has the potential to hit very hard with single and two hit combos, but beyond that its just show. I wish I could prove it.
Ever seen the show mith busters? I'd like to start one called martial busters. And I'd be the target.
I disagree with this point. A good strike puts a lot of force into the target. Force is related to the acceleration of an object. So a hand moving that fast and hitting a target, causing massive deceleration, will impart a very large force into the target. So a strike that is very relaxed and travelling fast will be better than a tense strike moving slower. Obviously there are other factors involved such as deformation of the striking hand etc. but with all other things being the same the relaxed strike is more effective.

Also, every strike that lands in this way is powerful, i know this because i have experienced it first hand. One punch of this style to the chest is enough to end a bout and if not measured can cause significant damage.

To get power from strikes requires the hand structure to be good. This only requires tension of the forearm muscles, which are not not used in throwing the strikes and hence this tension does not slow the strike down.
 

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hixxy said:
but to hit someone hard you have to tense which will slow you down tho

so punching that fast he must be relaxing therefor theres no power in those strikes
this satement is not true and I believe my students would go with me on this one, while most people believe this statement it is not true at least to what I have found, I can hit a lot harder with being loose than being hard, ask Xequat he will definately attest
 

still learning

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Hello, The above video clip was just a training excerise. It will be different if he was striking for real.

Try this for elbow strikes upward...close your fist...then open your hands and do the same elbow strike upward. Can you feel the differance?

If you watch muai thai fighters...elbows are done more open hand. ......Aloha
 

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Martial Tucker said:
2. Fast as he was, he also had a heckuva lot of knockouts. Speed and power are not mutually exclusive. Speed amplifies power exponentially.

Can you explain this further?

Force = Mass times Acceleration.

Acceleration is the rate of change over time, or the first derivative of speed.

Speed or velocity is the distance travelled over time.

I am curious as to the exponentially part of your explanation.

Thank you sir.
 

Xequat

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ppko said:
this satement is not true and I believe my students would go with me on this one, while most people believe this statement it is not true at least to what I have found, I can hit a lot harder with being loose than being hard, ask Xequat he will definately attest

Nope, everything ppko wrote is wrong. Just kidding; I'm going to pay for that in class. But I do agree that loose is almost always, if not always better. I can't think of any situations where tight would be better, but I'm sure that there are some. Like rutherford stated, tight muscles will create resistance, therefore slowing your movements down. My video didn't have sound, but it looked like some sort of sticky hands drill, and every time I tense up during those drills, it sends a message to my opponent about what I'm going to do since we are in contact, as well as slowing me down, so there's a double whammy. But keeping loose allows the muscles to reamin free and create speed, which in turn results in power. I still tend to tense up my fists on contact with punches from time to time, but you really shouldn't have to if body mechanics are good. But, with open-handed attacks like those in the videos, definitely stay loose to lower friction and resistance.

Ever hit a baseball or golf ball really far when you weren't really trying and thought "wow, that went pretty far; if only I had really tried harder, I'd have gotten all of it and it would have gone even farther?" Fact is, it wouldn't have gone farther. You were loose, which allowed your muscles to move unrestricted. Same concept.

Keep in mind that he might go slower in a real fight because in the video he wasn't following through with his attacks since the other guy was an uke, not an opponent or enemy. Try it in class...grab some pads and punch with all your might and tense muscles then punch loosely and see which hurts more. Same with open hands. One drill we've done is to stand to the side with the uke holding pads in front. Slap as hard as you can with tight muscles. Then slap really loosely Follow through on both, like you are trying to slap the uke's back or even the wall behind him/her as you stand perpendicular to him/her. It feels to me like the harder attack is a surface blow and yeah, it could hurt. A lot. But the loose one feels like it just goes through me. It sucks. Even more.
 
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hixxy

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thanx for all the comments,it does make sense to me no actually.

also on the topic of wing chun i saw a master of wing chun on a tv programme called "mind,body & kickass moves".

the master was a small plump guy and he stated that bruce lee (he used bruce lee as a example because everyone no's hes a MA star) wouldnt of been very good at sticky hands because of the way he had developed his muscles so much which would of made him slower and less effective.
 

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I don't know about that. I remeber interviews of masters talking about bruce and sticky hands. They said that he was amazing at it. He had tremendous speed and power. As for the too much muscle thing. Bruce wasn't built like a body builder, being "jacked". He was shredded with lean muscle mass. His speed wasn't slowed down a bit, according to those who witnessed him in action.
 

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hixxy said:
thanx for all the comments,it does make sense to me no actually.

also on the topic of wing chun i saw a master of wing chun on a tv programme called "mind,body & kickass moves".

the master was a small plump guy and he stated that bruce lee (he used bruce lee as a example because everyone no's hes a MA star) wouldnt of been very good at sticky hands because of the way he had developed his muscles so much which would of made him slower and less effective.

Yeah it is Wing Chun.

Yes the guy was fast because the other guy wasnt blocking or anything, he was just standing there.

On the Bruce Lee note, Bruce lifted weights yes but not for mass.
Look at boxers, like a Sugar Shane Mosley, he lifts weights butnot for mass.
Smaller weights with quick reps helps you become more "cut" aka lean and builds up your speed if done correctly as opposed to lifting heavy weights.

You wanna help obtain speed then lift low weights with more reps rather than heavy weights with low reps. Bruce Lee being terrible at sticky hands doesnt even sound right to me at all.
 
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hixxy

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AceHBK said:
. Bruce Lee being terrible at sticky hands doesnt even sound right to me at all.

i wasnt inplying bruce lee was terrible at sticky hands,i was saying that this master stated that Mr Lee wouldnt be very good due to his muscle he had developed.

is that correct that doing lighter weights with quicker reps can iprove your speed?
 
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