Reckless martial artists

Kittan Bachika

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Has anyone ever had to deal with a reckless martial artist? Whether it is a teacher or student, have you ever dealt with a martial artist who had little or no control and ended up injuring themselves and others? How did you deal with them?
 

LuckyKBoxer

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in 18 years I have dealt with several of them..
we had a guy who actually earned the nickname... "No Control" and another guy who tore a fellow practitioners ACL because of his lack of control...
That was back in the days when blood marked our floors daily. Now those guys are sent to the MMA classes where the aggression and lack of control they show can be better handled and dealt with.
 

ralphmcpherson

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Back in school there were heaps of them. Young, full of testosterone and combining a lot of weight lifting with a lot of martial arts. It was a bad combination and they would go out looking for fights to "test their skills". As someone said in an earlier post, life ends up sorting them out. I know of two of them who are now in jail and a couple of others who have amounted to nothing. The MA clubs who let them become like this are irresponsible. Guys like that would last 5 minutes where I train.
 

Namii

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We have an overzealous 14 year old blue belt that I would call spastic. We had a seminar last weekend with our master's master and we were going through forms step by step. Mr Spaz didnt want to listen and repeatedly not follow directions and go ahead of the Master. It resulted in getting himself chewed out in front of everyone. A couple days later I was discussing this with another classmate and she said he later got taken around the corner and got a good talking to by Sabumnim.
 
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Kittan Bachika

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In a good dojo, they have a change of heart, or they get weeded out.

I have heard of stories of students getting a little wild with the master during sparring. And they end up getting blasted across the room.

One particular one that stands out is a grappling class where a student was in a hold and tapping out but the the other student did not let go until he started screaming. That student was out of action for a couple of weeks. No major damage, but he was limping for awhile. The teacher ripped that student a new one for not being more aware. The teacher also told the class to be careful at all times.

Even when everything got back normal, he was not the most popular guy to grapple with.

The student ended up weeding himself out and left.
 

Mike Hamer

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I myself in my 5 years of training have been fortunate enough to not have dealt with anyone like this! *knocks on wood*
 

Kemposhot

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I've seen them either get weeded out, or asked to tone it down and they will comply.

Guys with no control and are reckless don't usually last long it seems and go from dojo to dojo.
 

Aiki Lee

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Yeah from time they pop up. Constant reminers from the sensei are the only things that keep them in check. Those who simply lack control tend to get better with reminders, but need to be watched more closely by the instructors.
 

Aikikitty

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The few times I've seen it, they've either been weeded out either by themselves or sensei asks them to be uke.:ticked:

Robyn :angel:
 

searcher

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I have had to deal with them for all the time I have been training. The sad part is that they always seem to be naturally talented and always want to show their skills off.

The only way for them to not be aproblem for the class is to seperate them or make them leave. Some of them, early on, I put with more advanced students. It either changes their attitude or it makes them leave.
 

Sensei Payne

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Usually its white belts that have a problem with control, since they are so new. Most times a new student is humble and KNOWS that they are inexperinced and need to take there time...

but sometimes you get that one guy or gal that thinks they are the best thing since sliced bread and can't be told anything by anyone...and to think..they are actually paying for classes. So with those individuals you just have to take your time, and show them slowly but surely that they need the guidence you are giving them.

There is nothing wrong with instilling humility into your students, as long as its not done pridefully or in anger.
 

Brian R. VanCise

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I myself in my 5 years of training have been fortunate enough to not have dealt with anyone like this! *knocks on wood*

We weed them out quick! Most do not want to stick around long enough and put in enough work to get to the point where they have the opportunity to spar full contact and roll with submissions. Just one more reason for positional rolling and also making sure that people have enough skill sets before sparring!
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Sensei Payne

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We weed them out quick! Most do not want to stick around long enough and put in enough work to get to the point where they have the opportunity to spar full contact and roll with submissions. Just one more reason for positional rolling and also making sure that people have enough skill sets before sparring!
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I disagree...an instructor should baby step them. Put the brakes on until they are truely ready for whatever task they are Reckless in.

As long as there heart is in the right palce, then there is no reason why they should be "weeded out". There will always be bad apples, but that doesn't mean that most times an apple can be saved. A good instructor will see the recklessness in a student, and simply, slow them down, or help them develop the discipline necessary to train at a high level
 

ETinCYQX

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I have heard of stories of students getting a little wild with the master during sparring. And they end up getting blasted across the room.

One particular one that stands out is a grappling class where a student was in a hold and tapping out but the the other student did not let go until he started screaming. That student was out of action for a couple of weeks. No major damage, but he was limping for awhile. The teacher ripped that student a new one for not being more aware. The teacher also told the class to be careful at all times.

Even when everything got back normal, he was not the most popular guy to grapple with.

The student ended up weeding himself out and left.

I'd be livid if I had that happen to me. No excuse for it.
 

Blade96

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i was told some of those and some of those with a tendency to bully popped up in our dojo from time to time before i joined. The black belts took them asidde and, aheam, 'showed' them why they weren't all that :p wish i could have seen it.
 

UKS

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In a good dojo, they have a change of heart, or they get weeded out.
I think this is very true, people have a change of heart and learn to humble themselves and allow the Teacher to coach them and guide them to be a better person and Martial Artist. Those that don't end up leaving at some point or that's what I've experienced. A good instructor should be able to see this early on in the students MA training.
 

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