Not being hit

Balrog

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Make at least one of these four conditions true and you won't get hit:

1. They can't see you
2. They can't touch you
3. They can't breathe
4. They can't stand
 
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Kung Fu Wang

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So with strategy you do not mean a pre-defined set of movements but rather a preferred situation / position? Then I can agree.

I have a place I want to be but every move the opponent does will either let me continue on my path or do something else.

Like chess, at start I want a position and rarely can I continue that path more than 1-2 moves before I need to change based on opponent moving differently.

Otherwise I end up chasing which is a big no for me.
You have strategy and your opponent also has strategy. Who's strategy will work depends on the skill level. For example, if your strategy is to drag your opponent's arm and run behind him.

If your opponent's skill level is

- low, he will either resist or yield. In this case, you will still have control and your strategy continue to work.
- high, he will cut in front of you and take the control back.

The question is when your opponent takes his control back, will you be able to take your control back again? In other words, your strategy should also include "deal with your opponent's strategy". This is why your strategy should be tested at least 10,000 times.
 
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Kung Fu Wang

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Old saying said, "If you don't want to get hit, hit your opponent."

IMO, this is a very good strategy. You put your jab fist right in front of your opponent's face, when your opponent tries to deal with that hand, your cross will come to his face right at that moment.

This is to fight in your opponent's territory and not in your own territory. You put one of your fists right in front of your opponent's face. Your have occupied his striking path. You also don't give him enough space for his punch to generate speed and power.

This is like to prevent a problem from happening instead of to let a problem to happen, you then try to fix it. You let your opponent to worry about your punches and put him in defense mode.

Do you use this strategy in your MA system (such as jab, jab, cross)?
 
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JP3

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"Best way block punch, you no be there." Miyagi-san, from Karate Kid.

Sorry, couldn't resist.

Staying outside their range, and being too close inside their range, are my own favorites. Being close to, and beside or behind them, are my next two most favorable positions to move to - IF you have some grappling (aikido, judo, jujitsu, sambo, wrestling of some form, etc) in your personal toolkit. Don't close if you don't know what to do when you get there, that's a bad idea generally.

Other than that, what Tony said above is the laundry list I'd typically discuss, and as he said, combining two different things off of the list at once is the most tactically-advanced way to do things.
 

marques

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Old saying said, "If you don't want to get hit, hit your opponent."

IMO, this is a very good strategy. You put your jab fist right in front of your opponent's face, when your opponent tries to deal with that hand, your cross will come to his face right at that moment.

This is to fight in your opponent's territory and not in your own territory. You put one of your fists right in front of your opponent's face. Your have occupied his striking path. You also don't give him enough space for his punch to generate speed and power.

This is like to prevent a problem from happening instead of to let a problem to happen, you then try to fix it. You let your opponent to worry about your punches and put him in defense mode.

Do you use this strategy in your MA system (such as jab, jab, cross)?

I couldn't explain better. Just can add a little thing.

I can use a jab also in my own territory, too. I mean, even if it is out of range, it may prevent an attack. Last training against a good and fast(er) boxer a couldn't stop moving without being attacked. And just half jab, the intention of a jab was enough to give me time to continue to something else. When I stoped for some reason, he was attacking.

Second situation, on the same training (later on). I was so tired that I could not do much more than that, jabs out of range. My partner was fresh and fast. I used jab out of range, because I could not move fast enough... And after so much fake punches a real one can be a surprise. :)

I like to use Jab, Jab, [strike where is more open, punch or kick.] And the 'Jab' may be sort of long uppercut or long hook... changing in the way...
 
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Kung Fu Wang

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I like to use Jab, Jab, [strike where is more open, punch or kick.] And the 'Jab' may be sort of long uppercut or long hook... changing in the way...
I have only seen this strategy used in the praying mantis system. By using a left low hook, left high hook (similar to jab, jab) to set up a right cross.

I don't understand why this strategy is not popular besides boxing and praying mantis. May be someone else can explain this better.
 

marques

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I have only seen this strategy used in the praying mantis system. By using a left low hook, left high hook (similar to jab, jab) to set up a right cross.

I don't understand why this strategy is not popular besides boxing and praying mantis. May be someone else can explain this better.
I think some internal martial arts (Bagua?) have it, since they like to move constantly instead of more speed and pre-set combos. Sorry if it is imprecise. About IMC I just read some books.
 
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Touch Of Death

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I have only seen this strategy used in the praying mantis system. By using a left low hook, left high hook (similar to jab, jab) to set up a right cross.

I don't understand why this strategy is not popular besides boxing and praying mantis. May be someone else can explain this better.
There is an eye dominance trick, where if you throw something, distracting, even wiggling your fingers, to the far side of their dominant eye, they will look in that direction, and not see the right cross coming. :)
 

KangTsai

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I'm trying to develop a Dominick Crus-esque technique of throwing a long straight punch, then weaving my head under the punching hand to shift angle and protect the side of my head.
 

Buka

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Some great advice along this thread. Simplifying it all - "when he moves, you move."
I think if you keep that in your strategy while training, or preparing for a fight, it will help you a great deal.
 
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Kung Fu Wang

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Someone may hate me to put up these clips again. But I think these clips do fit into this discussion. There are 3 strategies used here.

1. Ooffense is the best defense. Let your opponent to worry about your attack.


2. If my arms already occupy the space of your attacking path, it will leave you no room to attack me through that path.


3. Try to change a striking game into a grappling game ASAP - try not to let your opponent to throw more than 2 punches.

 
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