Burnt out?

Nyrotic

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Ok, so I practice Wing Chun, and over the past few months I've been practicing quite diligently (At least 15 minutes of stretching followed by 30-45 minutes of Wing Chun practice). I figure that for the average individual, a full hour of training every day is a decent amount to pursue. However, in the past two days I've felt exhausted. Not physically, but mentally. I just don't have the motivation to practice right now (I only did the basic forms 2-3 times each and that was it, nothing else).

I know that in a few days I'll have it back and I'll be training with a newfound vigor, but does taking 2-3 day breaks from our martial arts almost entirely have any serious negative effects when we train constantly at all other times? I never want to reach a point where I am forcing myself to train, so would you say it's safe for me to take this short break every month or so? What are some reasons that I could be feeling this way? Is there anything else that I could do that isn't directly training martial arts such as meditation or Qi Gong (This excludes hobbies like reading and such)?

Please help!
Anthony
 

bluekey88

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It is always good to schedule training breaks. it is very easy to get into a training rut...you migh tget worn down physically. You might, as in your case, get worn down mentally.

In any event, when that happens, taking a few days off and resting 9truly resting) is the best thing you can do. I actually go so far as to schedule my training breaks (every 6 weeks or so). The body (and your brain/mind is a part of your body) needs time to rest and recuperate. I find that when I take time off, when i come back I've sometimes made great strides in places that I was stuck...a tthe very least I've not lost ground and am no longer dragging my butt to get to class.

Peace,
Erik
 

shihansmurf

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Do you do other sports?

If not then I would suggest that you look into taking up something else as a break in the routine. Maybe jogging every other day or light weight training. Racquetball(although I don't care for it) is all the rage among the few Wing Chun buddies I have. The point is that it is all well and good to train for an hour a day, and dedication is a great thing, but if you are to the point that you are having to force yourself to train then you might need some time off. No shame in that. Cross training in other sports is a great way to work muscle groups and improve your fitness in ways that martial art training just doesn't. Not a shot at MA, different sports require different skillsets and different fitness abilities. I had this graphically demonstrated to me by playing vollyball, once.

Try other stuff, take some time off, recharge you batteries. You performance of your martial arts will be better because of it.

Mark
 
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Ninebird8

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With all due respect, you are burnt out after an hour of training? Wow!! In the old days, that was our warm up time to do stretching, basic stances, kicks, punches, etc, then an hour of forms practice, then an hour of sparring of all types, finished off by individual or joint training with our teachers. I do get burnt out sometimes if I am doing the same thing, but the wonderful thing for me about Northern styles and taichi, I very rarely do the same practice two times in a row. One suggestion I would have is to vary your martial arts routine and work on different aspects. Another thing I would do, if you are doing many reps, is to fool your mind and count differently...for instance, if your sifu wants you to strike 100 times, count in 4 sets of 25 in your mind rather than up to 100. Sounds stupid, but it works!! Otherwise, if you are getting tired or burnt after that short of a time, my suggestion is you really concentrate on why you are doing wing chun in the first place, and use that as continued motivation.
 

KempoGuy06

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ive only been in the MA's for 2 and half years. after a year and a half I took a 2 month break because i was burnt out. it was the same day in and day out and i could do it anymore. I took some time off, improved my bowling average and went back with ne found passion. the pain I felt after training for the first time after being off was invigorating.

I HAD to take 5 months off due to injury then job change. I hit the doors full speed with a whole new outlook and know I look at the time off as a welcomed break.

I say its good. take the time to rest (your brain). repition is good for the muscles but can be bad (in a away) for the mind. you get into habbits good or bad, but it keeps you from looking at you Art outside the box. taking time to study without doing may prove to enhance what you can do already (in theory at least.) :D

B
 

Xue Sheng

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Ok, so I practice Wing Chun, and over the past few months I've been practicing quite diligently (At least 15 minutes of stretching followed by 30-45 minutes of Wing Chun practice). I figure that for the average individual, a full hour of training every day is a decent amount to pursue. However, in the past two days I've felt exhausted. Not physically, but mentally. I just don't have the motivation to practice right now (I only did the basic forms 2-3 times each and that was it, nothing else).

I know that in a few days I'll have it back and I'll be training with a newfound vigor, but does taking 2-3 day breaks from our martial arts almost entirely have any serious negative effects when we train constantly at all other times? I never want to reach a point where I am forcing myself to train, so would you say it's safe for me to take this short break every month or so? What are some reasons that I could be feeling this way? Is there anything else that I could do that isn't directly training martial arts such as meditation or Qi Gong (This excludes hobbies like reading and such)?

Please help!
Anthony

Continue to "force" yourself to train and you WILL eventually stop all together. Give yourself a break now and then and you are much more likely to continue.
 

JadecloudAlchemist

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I think its normal. Sometimes you just don't feel like training.

To me it means it is time to take a break. Martial arts should have a level of resistance but when it becomes something you dread you are most likely not going to do it.

There are some days instead of Martial arts I focus more on walking or mediation. The point is I am not forcing myself but allowing myself a break of routine which helps in my overall development.
 

shihansmurf

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Continue to "force" yourself to train and you WILL eventually stop all together. Give yourself a break now and then and you are much more likely to continue.

Exactly. Better to take a short break or diversion now versus a long/permanant break later. Perspective on training is a great thing.

Mark
 

Ninebird8

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After all these years, I have enough where most of the time my practice varies almost every day. I definitely feel sometimes like doing a good,strenuous kung fu workout, then the next day an internal tai chi workout is good for me. Another thing I learned from one of my three masters, is after awhile to stop training and start practicing. To differentiate, in his words, "training is the daily repetition the first few years to establish muscle memory, understand the techniques, get how to train and what to train, etc. After that, it evolves into practice, where one goes on the path of converting, either knowingly or not, from technique and many reps to a naturalness where one is in harmony and moving without thought but purpose." One of my funnest things to do, and I try to do it one day a week at least, is to forget about forms, and move naturally where I envision fighting or just moving within myself, in no set pattern. I find this both fun and relaxing. Naturalness leads to relaxation or absence of tension.

Lastly, I try to ride bikes with my son, go 4 wheeling with my wife and kung fu students/families, etc. to have fun outside the physical context of the art. I have many interests, though martial arts is my passion, and this allows me to partition the time practiced into value time. I may only practice 1-2 hours in any one day now vs. 3-4 hours a day in the past on average, but in that time it is fun, concentrated, and working on things I know need work or I love to do.

These are some prescriptions for me.
 

geezer

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Ok, so I practice Wing Chun, and over the past few months I've been practicing quite diligently (At least 15 minutes of stretching followed by 30-45 minutes of Wing Chun practice)...

...does taking 2-3 day breaks from our martial arts almost entirely have any serious negative effects when we train constantly at all other times? I never want to reach a point where I am forcing myself to train, so would you say it's safe for me to take this short break every month or so?

Please help!
Anthony

I've been involved in WT/WC for a long time (since '79) and my advice is that taking a break from time to time is actually helpful. Sometimes when you hit a plateau and don't seem to be making progress a break is exactly what you need. And, amazingly, sometimes when you show up at class your Sifu will comment that you a have actually improved!

Secondly. some routines can get really dull. Training is work. But it shouldn't be all work all the time. If you aren't enjoying it too, examine how you are training. Are you just working out alone? Or do you meet up with a friend to train drills with (a better idea). Are you just doing form? Or do you do some paired routines, chi-sau and sparring? At any level, from beginner to advanced, there is a lot to choose from.

Finally, take a good look at the comments by Shihansmurf. Doing a variety of activities may seem to divide your attention and slow your progress...in the short term. But if it keeps your interest up you'll benefit over the long hall. I divide my time between Wing Tsun, Escrima, and a moderate fitness regimen that includes hill-jogging and weights. And I'm never bored!
 

IcemanSK

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I used to train in full contact kickboxing years ago. I loved it, but sometimes I felt burned out doing the same type of training. I trained with a guy who was in the gym 2-4 hours, 6 days a week. He was a freak & incredibly talented. Heck, he'd even train the day after a fight, if he KO'ed his opponent in the 1st 3 rounds or so. (He's the gentleman on my member page!)

One day, I asked him how he kept from gettin' burned out. He laughed & said, "I take time off all the time. I'll take a week or 2 off every few months & do nothing, or just do something else." (I hadn't been around gim long enough to see him do that).

If you're gonna train, you have to rest, too. Not just for burn out, but injury prevention, too. You can get injuries from over use.

You love your Art. Taking a break, trying something new, or resting doesn't mean you love it any less. I've often found a re-newed love for my Art when I take a break for awhile.

All my best.
 

terryl965

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We all go though burn out what seperates most people is the will to over come the syndrome of burn out. Best of luck to you.
 

MJS

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Ok, so I practice Wing Chun, and over the past few months I've been practicing quite diligently (At least 15 minutes of stretching followed by 30-45 minutes of Wing Chun practice). I figure that for the average individual, a full hour of training every day is a decent amount to pursue. However, in the past two days I've felt exhausted. Not physically, but mentally. I just don't have the motivation to practice right now (I only did the basic forms 2-3 times each and that was it, nothing else).

I know that in a few days I'll have it back and I'll be training with a newfound vigor, but does taking 2-3 day breaks from our martial arts almost entirely have any serious negative effects when we train constantly at all other times? I never want to reach a point where I am forcing myself to train, so would you say it's safe for me to take this short break every month or so? What are some reasons that I could be feeling this way? Is there anything else that I could do that isn't directly training martial arts such as meditation or Qi Gong (This excludes hobbies like reading and such)?

Please help!
Anthony

To answer your question of whether or not taking a break will effect your training? The answer is no. Actually, breaks are a good thing. I've taken week breaks, sometimes 2 weeks from lifting weights and believe it or not, when I start up again, sure, it takes a bit to pick up from where you left off, but I find that I have a better workout session.

Unless I'm injured, the most time I take off from martial arts training is a week. It'll definately do your mind and body good to take some time to rest. :)
 

still learning

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Hello, If you don't enjoy it anymore? .....than your body and mind is telling you something?

Find something that does? ....or do something completely different...golf? ..go fishing?

Everyone should have goals ....dreams...and accomplishments in there lives....SEARCH FOR WHAT YOU WANT TO DO!

My daughter is on the high school wreslting team...they train VERY HARD FOR 2 1/2 hours right after school, Saturdays is more training sometime lifting weights....5 days a week plus saturdays..

wind sprints,running thru out school....intense work-outs ...even football players quit because of the intensity!

WHY MY DAUGHTER GOES EVERYDAY? .....love the sport of wrestling and knows the only way they will get better is to TRAIN HARDER EVERYDAY!

They want to be STATE champs! They want to be winners....and they know only one way......train everyday and with intensity!

The difference between wanting? ....and think you want it!

Aloha ....one must enjoy life...and every part...should be something you look forward to..
 

tko4u

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you cant train continuosly all the time, your body needs time to relax!
 

Grenadier

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Taking a break is fine, but before you do, set a firm, hard date, on when you will return to the training, and stick with it.

The most dangerous part of a 1 week break, is that 1 week could easily become two weeks, a month, or a year, in the blink of an eye.
 

bluekey88

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That's a really good point Grenadier. Like I said I usually take a break from training every couple of couple of months (every 4-6 weeks for weight traing/conditionging, every 3 months or so for MA stuff)
.

However, I consider these breaks as a PART of my training and shcedule them as such. They usually have a start date (unless they are a result of ilness/injury) and a firm resume date. Just like when i schedule a change in my weight routine, or when I schedule a class.

Peace,
Erik
 

CDA4555

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There is absolutely nothing wrong with taking a break now and then especially when you have trained consistently. In the old "hardcore" days they would train for hours, times have changed and everyone has a busy schedule to contend with. If you are still struggling with motivation then maybe you should find other practitioners in your area to train with. Good luck.
 

hpulley

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My dojo has set summer and winter vacation breaks. When I just started I hated them as I was all keen but I look forward to them now. Even if I don't take the whole two weeks off myself I can just use them as time to review things I have already been shown at my own pace instead of the usual hard training.

Usually I hate even missing a day. I normally don't train on the weekends (Family) and it makes me look forward to Monday like never before.
 

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