Question about forms.

Leo89

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I'm still practicing Kibon Hana, but I'm wondering how many forms there are in the kibon set?

What are kicho forms?

And I guess on a personal one, do you practice (and or teach) the Palgwe set?

I guess what I really mean to ask is, how many total forms are there in both kukkiwon and Chang hon styles?

I'm not in a rush to fly through the ranks, I think it's good to fully master forms, they serve a multitude of purposes.

They, to my limited knowledge (I'm a former karateka), they are a catalogue of basic technique, and can be used as a memory test, I don't believe in hidden application, but there are somethings I still probably don't understand, and... Well, the longer it takes to master, the longer you have to stretch, workout, and spar.

I'm not that good though, I still get confused on a certain step.

Anyway, i just thought I'd ask, I find taekwondo forms interesting.
 
That's a great question.

In Kukkiwon/WTF-style taekwondo, there are usually 10 color-belt ranks, but there are only 8 defined forms (Taegeuk 1-8). The upshot is that each school is left to its own devices to decide what the curriculum should be for those other 2 color-belt ranks. Many schools teach 2 "kibon" (i.e., "basic") forms for other 2 color-belt ranks, but different schools use different forms for these basic forms.

Some schools teach kibon forms that are derived from forms developed by Hwang Kee circa 1947. These are the Kicho Hyeong (which again just means "basic forms"). You can read more about those here: Kicho Hyeong Il Bu One typical example of a Kibon Hana ("basic form 1") is seen here: Kibon Hana and it's based entirely on Kicho Hyeong Il Bu.

In terms of how many TOTAL forms there are (all taekwondo styles), there's a big list of forms here: Taekwondo Forms There are some niche styles that use their own forms, and those aren't on the big list, but only because I don't know what those forms are. (Niche styles tend to not publish much. If anybody has info on niche forms used in taekwondo, feel free to pass the info along!)

At our school, we learn the Kibon and Taegeuk forms while color-belts, then Black Belt (Yudanja) and Palgwae forms while black-belts.

800
 
I'm still practicing Kibon Hana, but I'm wondering how many forms there are in the kibon set?
What are kicho forms?

Kicho and Kibon are variations on the same Englilsh translation of the Korean. They mean "basic", essentially.
We teach 6 Kicho forms.

And I guess on a personal one, do you practice (and or teach) the Palgwe set?

Yes, I do.

I guess what I really mean to ask is, how many total forms are there in both kukkiwon and Chang hon styles?

The KKW uses the 9 Taegeuk forms for colored (geup) ranks and 9 yudanja forms for Dan ranks. There are 24 Chang Hon forms.

I'm not in a rush to fly through the ranks, I think it's good to fully master forms, they serve a multitude of purposes.

They, to my limited knowledge (I'm a former karateka), they are a catalogue of basic technique, and can be used as a memory test, I don't believe in hidden application, but there are somethings I still probably don't understand, and... Well, the longer it takes to master, the longer you have to stretch, workout, and spar.

I'm not that good though, I still get confused on a certain step.

Anyway, i just thought I'd ask, I find taekwondo forms interesting.

The applications are not hidden, though they may not be obvious. In Kibon Hana (which we refer to as Kicho Il Jang) you're probably doing forward stances, low blocks, and middle punches. But there's more to it. The low block, for example, can be used as a strike. The chamber for the low block is also a block in it's own right.
They're not secrets. They're just not obvious.[/QUOTE][/QUOTE]
 
What are the names of the six kicho forms?
 
What are the names of the six kicho forms?

Kicho (Il, Ee, Sam, Sa, Oh, Yook) Jang

I thought there were 8 taegeuk forms (ee jang to pal jang) . What is the 9th?

That would be the incredibly complicated Taegeuk Typo Jang. It's the same as Pal Jang, but everything is done one space over.
 
Kicho (Il, Ee, Sam, Sa, Oh, Yook) Jang



That would be the incredibly complicated Taegeuk Typo Jang. It's the same as Pal Jang, but everything is done one space over.
My typo as well in writing tageuk ee jang. I was thinking Mandarin (e, r , sun)....I meant il jang.
 
I can't find any TSD or TKD videos on the kicho forms, other than il, ee, and sam.

I can't help but notice the names you mention have the same names of the Taeguk forms, so is kukkiwon TKD somehow tied into TSD?

I don't really have any forms outside of kibon, Taeguk, Palgwe, and Yudanja, but the kicho hyeung seem very interesting.
 
I can't find any TSD or TKD videos on the kicho forms, other than il, ee, and sam.

I can't help but notice the names you mention have the same names of the Taeguk forms, so is kukkiwon TKD somehow tied into TSD?

I don't really have any forms outside of kibon, Taeguk, Palgwe, and Yudanja, but the kicho hyeung seem very interesting.

Kibon and Kicho are the same thing. They're just different romanizations of the Hangul.

Tang Soo Do is basically just the Korean translation of what the Japanese call Karate. The Shotokan Karate was the primary source for the development of TKD. During the unification of the Kwans, the largest single Kwan was the MDK, which taught TSD.
So yes, it is safe to say that there is a connection between TKD and TSD.

The name of the forms are taegeuk, palgwae, etc. Il, ee, sam, sa, etc are not names. They're numbers. Taegeuk Il Jang means "the first taegeuk form."
The Kicho, Taegeuk and Palgwae forms are numbered. Other formsets (the KKW yudanja forms, the Chang Hon tul, etc) have individual names.

The first three kicho/kibon forms seem to be pretty widely taught. 4-6 may very well be something the heads of our MDK association developed; I've never asked about their origins.
 

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