I'm curious. Why do people study more than Martial Art.

girlbug2

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1. Desire for knowledge

2. Desire to be a balanced martial artist

3. My first sensei retired.
 

blindsage

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Moved across the country away from my original school. Spent most of my 20s trying different styles periodically out of curiosity, but not being able to settle down and train in anything for too long either because of time constraints, or bad personal finances. I am more settled now so I have the time and resources to train. My original style was Kyokushin Karate with some Small Circle Jiu-Jitsu as well, but I'm not excited about going back to my old style Karate training. Over the years I have become interested in the neijia (internal) Chinese style of Baguazhang and have found an excellent teacher in my area. He also teaches Yang and Chen style Taiji and I will likely eventually take up one or both of those as well. I find my interests in MA evolve all the time and lead me in new directions to explore, I like discovering the different styles, techniques and approaches different arts use. But for me personally Bagua feels right and I'm in it for the long haul.
 

Aiki Lee

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I was going to study a bunch of systems. My plan was to learn karate and then combine it with jujutsu, ninjutsu and anything else I could find, simply because I wasn't getting everything I wanted from just one style. Karate was great for striking, but I didn't know much grappling (despite grappling being a traditional part of naha-te). And ninjutsu and jujutsu always seemed cool because jujutsu has lock ups and ground fighting, and ninjutsu could teach me tactics I wouldn't have thought of before.

Then my toshindo school changed over to the Jizaikan aiki ninjutsu curriculum which had everything I ever wanted in a martial art. Ground fighting, traditional weapons, modern weapons, emphasis on principle based training. I found I no longer wanted to study all the martial arts I could, because this art had everything I needed and more stuff I never even thought about. So instead of studying a bunch of systems to make my own art, I'll master this system and teach it to the students I will take on one day.
 

harlan

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Started MA with Matayoshi kobudo. Saw that teacher also taught Goju, and wanted to learn that as well. The two are a good fit.

With only 5 years in, I don't have any interest in learning other arts...only in studying them for their attributes/deficiencies.
 

Phoenix44

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I just wanted to learn different things and add to my skill set. Different arts bring different principles.
 

Hudson69

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For me; I am looking for a small series of reliable techniques that will work, with modification, in a number of instances. In order to distill the techniques that I will be comfortable with and I can effectively apply means I have to shop around. I have looked at Kenpo, Budo Taijutsu, Tae Kwon Do, Jeet Kune Do, Krav Maga and more to do just that but I am in law enforcement and the Army National Guard and feel that I need to have a short list of techniques that work in or out of uniform. (I like to have practiced/observed a large number but keeping it simple seems to work best for me).

Still though I usually carry and practice with a variety of firearms and have found that you can usually de-escalate a situation with words instead of fists.
 

MJS

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I've read a lot of posts on here and what seems to be the common thread is that people have multiple MA backgrounds.

I was curious to peoples reasoning for moving from one art to another.

Well, for me, I train in 3 arts...Kenpo, Arnis and BJJ. I'm currently more active in Kenpo and Arnis, but I do try to roll when I can. Why do I train in 3? Those arts really came to me. What I mean is, other people that I train with have various backgrounds, so once I got a taste of what they did, I was pretty much hooked. :)

Kenpo is and always will be my base art. However, while Kenpo has some weapon work and ground work, I wanted to expand in those areas, and IMO, if that is something that you want to do, you need to go to an art that specializes in those areas.

Those 3 arts blend together so well, its amazing. I feel that I'm more well rounded as far as training and sd goes.
 

IcemanSK

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If I had to sum it up in one word it would "opportunity". For some, they have a lot of opportunity to study many Arts in their town. Some folks only have few opportunities to train in their town. They or their instructor moves away, opportunities change.

I've stuck with one main Art (TKD) for 27 years, but delved in others as I had opportunity.
 

Deaf Smith

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I've never seen an art cover everything effectively for every person's build.

Each art seems to be designed for people like the ones who founded that art.

Deaf
 

frownland

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If I had to sum it up in one word it would "opportunity". For some, they have a lot of opportunity to study many Arts in their town. Some folks only have few opportunities to train in their town. They or their instructor moves away, opportunities change.
When I was in a big city, and had a lot of opportunities to study many arts, I didn't feel the need, because I was able to spend more time training one art (full-time school, lots of formal classes). Now, in a much smaller town, there are fewer classes, fewer students to train with after hours, and I've had to actively seek out training opportunities. As a result, I actively train two styles, and train regularly with friends from various others. Much more productive and fun, I reckon. And the day I stop having fun is the day I quit.
 

LordOfWu

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I'm only posting because my reasoning was a little different. I started with a mixed style of TKD, Kenpo, and some jiu jitsu. I love the school and the instructors, but when I moved across town I couldn't make classes. I tries some schools with similar skill sets, but decided I wanted to train in a specific style, and that was bjj. The reason I picked that was opposite of it fitting my body or physical style, actually I'm a little claustrophobic and I want to overcome that, meet it head on. I've been training now about 10 months and feel I've moved leaps and bounds on that issue, and go figure, I absolutely love it!
 

bluekey88

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Oroginally, that's jus thow my life worked out. I left Aikido becasue my parents split up and our finances went in the toilet...I couldn't afford to train. By th etime I could afford to train again, I'd moved and there was not an Aikido dojo anywhere in town...so I trained some karate. Then I moved again....it was wing chun when I could train again. Then some more karate.

Basically, I'd train when I had time and money to do so. Problem was if I had the time, I generally didn;t have the money (no job), when I had the money....no time (working too much).

Now, it's just normal for me to train multiple arts....although I've been able to stay consistently with tkd for osme time now.

Peace,
Erik
 

shihansmurf

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I have to move every few years because of my job and there isn't always a school for what I do where I'm being reassigned.

That's how I got into American Kenpo, the Army decided I needed to go to Colorado Springs and the Shotokan school's tuition was out of my price range(as a young E-2 with a new baby, Mrs Smurf and the offspring were much more important considerations in my budget). I trained at a school I could afford.

It turned out to be a great opportunity for me as it was an outstanding studio with one of the best instructors I've ever worked with. If y'all get a chance to work out with Dave Coppock in Colorado Springs I can't reccomend him enough.

Most places I've been to have boxing gyms and I've been able to maintain my focus in that but I like the traditional type karate school atmosphere. I teach when the Army is going to leave me in a place long enough, but the demands of my job make it difficult to do so.

Some people change arts when they simply discover that the martial art that they have chosen doesn't fit what they are wanting out of study. Most just quit, others go looking for a better fit.

Some bounce around looking for rank.

Some just like to try a lot of things.

Some like all the differnt cool uniforms. Its all about the fashion.

Maybe not.

:)

Mark
 

LordOfWu

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I have to move every few years because of my job and there isn't always a school for what I do where I'm being reassigned.

That's how I got into American Kenpo, the Army decided I needed to go to Colorado Springs and the Shotokan school's tuition was out of my price range(as a young E-2 with a new baby, Mrs Smurf and the offspring were much more important considerations in my budget). I trained at a school I could afford.

It turned out to be a great opportunity for me as it was an outstanding studio with one of the best instructors I've ever worked with. If y'all get a chance to work out with Dave Coppock in Colorado Springs I can't reccomend him enough.

Most places I've been to have boxing gyms and I've been able to maintain my focus in that but I like the traditional type karate school atmosphere. I teach when the Army is going to leave me in a place long enough, but the demands of my job make it difficult to do so.

Some people change arts when they simply discover that the martial art that they have chosen doesn't fit what they are wanting out of study. Most just quit, others go looking for a better fit.

Some bounce around looking for rank.

Some just like to try a lot of things.

Some like all the differnt cool uniforms. Its all about the fashion.

Maybe not.

:)

Mark

I have trained with Dave in the past, he is great! I used to train at Impact Karate, not sure if you've ever had the opportunity to train w/ Joe Cooper when he's been down there, but he was our head instructor.
 

Tez3

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I have to move every few years because of my job and there isn't always a school for what I do where I'm being reassigned.

That's how I got into American Kenpo, the Army decided I needed to go to Colorado Springs and the Shotokan school's tuition was out of my price range(as a young E-2 with a new baby, Mrs Smurf and the offspring were much more important considerations in my budget). I trained at a school I could afford.

It turned out to be a great opportunity for me as it was an outstanding studio with one of the best instructors I've ever worked with. If y'all get a chance to work out with Dave Coppock in Colorado Springs I can't reccomend him enough.

Most places I've been to have boxing gyms and I've been able to maintain my focus in that but I like the traditional type karate school atmosphere. I teach when the Army is going to leave me in a place long enough, but the demands of my job make it difficult to do so.

Some people change arts when they simply discover that the martial art that they have chosen doesn't fit what they are wanting out of study. Most just quit, others go looking for a better fit.

Some bounce around looking for rank.

Some just like to try a lot of things.

Some like all the differnt cool uniforms. Its all about the fashion.

Maybe not.

:)

Mark

I have two children training with me whose dad is an American Army officer on an exchange tour here, when it's time for them to go back to the States, may I give you a shout to see where they can train? They are doing TSD and Judo at the moment. All our children move on so we try to prepare them by giving them a taste of other styles as well as dojo/dojang customs they may come across.
 

Ninebird8

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For me, it was mostly a case of moving from time to time plus having the opportunity to train with the three masters I did. However, all of my styles were "bird" derivatives of kung fu like white crane, nine birds, and eagle claw. I also started Yang tai chi 20 years after my kung fu practice started (12 years ago) for several reasons: wanted to learn internal attacks, rooting, push hands, etc, knee injury so jumping not as important, and health reasons after a diagnosis 2 years ago. One of the kung fu brothers I spar every Tuesday in my garage is also a 3rd degree black in Brazilian juijitsu and 4th degree in aikido so it provides me with challenges as well. The only reason I really ever competed for 18 years was to go up against other arts to test my art's theories, discover gaps in my practice, and better myself. Lastly, as a small guy, needed to learn multiple ways of kicking someone in the balls, and running quickly away!!!
 

Andrew Green

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I've read a lot of posts on here and what seems to be the common thread is that people have multiple MA backgrounds.

I was curious to peoples reasoning for moving from one art to another.


Suppose you are in University and want to study history, chance are you will take classes with different professors and different specialties. See a wide range of ideas and develop your own as you go.

If someone suggested you should only study under one professor, in one specialty and that would be all you need you would likely think they are rather odd.

On the flip side of that, why do we have these artificial divisions of "style", why can't a person just study martial arts and not worry about lineages and grouping things into styles?
 

Bruno@MT

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On the flip side of that, why do we have these artificial divisions of "style", why can't a person just study martial arts and not worry about lineages and grouping things into styles?

Interesting question.

Not all styles are a natural fit for all people. To some people, karate feels right. To others its TKD or judo, or whatever. I have always been drawn towards traditional Japanese arts, and especially ju-jutsu and (now) ninpo.
I make no value judgements on e.g wing chun. It is not something I am drawn to, but that is just preference.

As for lineage, that is a bit trickier. There are 2 aspects to this that I can think of atm.

1) Many of the traditional MA were developed in times where life or death personal combat was the way in which MA systems competed in a darwinian fashion. Styles that survived had an edge over those that didn't. The ryuha that make up Genbukan ninpo survived for hundreds of years. So that fact alone is a good indicator that there is inherent value in them. If the lineage has remained unbroken all these years, then hundreds of years of experience and battle tested techniques have been passed down so that you can learn them.
Otoh, if someone throws together their own MA (like Dragonball Ninjutsu), there is no proof that it is any good, or complete, or that it is built on solid principles. Even if someone uses it to compete successfully in UFC, that only proves that that specific fighter can fight UFC fights. 1 is a statistically irrelevant sample size.

2) Looking at it the other way, if someone fakes a lineage or tries to mislead others (ninjutsu is unfortunately a popular target for con men) then that person is a liar. That fact alone would be enough for me to not want to train with them.
Lack of lineage is not a problem imo. I did modern JJ for 3,5 years, and my sensei told me up front that it was a modern art without a traditional lineage. Fine. No problem. As long as noone lies about it, it does not influence my decision.
 

Aniela13

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I began cross-training from Kenpo into Cha San Ryu because I moved 5 hours away to go to college, and the nearest Kenpo school was 3 hours away (I know a number of people would drive that far for lessons, but it just wasn't in my budget), so I suppose it was of necessity. I'm hoping to pick up Brazilian Ju Jitsu in the future, as my instructor here also teaches that, but once again finances are keeping me focused on one thing ;)

I also agree with the discussion that some styles are more suited for different people; I've recently been learning more weapons, spin kicks, and jump kicks than I ever did in Kenpo...while I'll never say that one is better than another (*grins* for the purpose of covering my own hide if nothing else!), both styles force me to look at fighting and MA from different perspectives, which I love.

My Kenpo instructor told me, upon my start of cross-training, that I'd probably find that my base style would always be Kenpo, and I know a lot of people who cross-train find that their first style is still their "base"...but I don't think studying additional arts takes away from your first :)

~Ani
 

Shizen Shigoku

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For cross-training or cross-dressing, because there is nothing like the utility of the little black dress that is the hakama.
 
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