Help me choose a new MA.

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vin2k0

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I've been studying karate now for 9 years and am wondering whether or not to try another art. I'm curious how it would compare to what i already know. Jujitsu seems appealing to me but how would i be starting from scratch if i am used to being knowledgable? Any help would be appreciated. What MA would you recommend me picking up? im know pretty much nothing about any other MA so thought id ask in here. Also, which art is a little more of a full-contact art?
 

Yari

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Originally posted by vin2k0
I've been studying karate now for 9 years and am wondering whether or not to try another art. I'm curious how it would compare to what i already know. Jujitsu seems appealing to me but how would i be starting from scratch if i am used to being knowledgable? Any help would be appreciated. What MA would you recommend me picking up? im know pretty much nothing about any other MA so thought id ask in here. Also, which art is a little more of a full-contact art?

Jujitsu is a comain term used by a lot of styles. But you proably could find something that should fit nicley. Americain kempo should be a good bet.

But it does come down to what do you want. Something to complement you ; grappling or weapon usage. Or is it a question about trying something more fluid, or totally different. Are we talking more philosophy, or?

But come to think about it, it would be like starting over, and the same concerns you had then, will be the same concerns now. The only difference is that you should be able to spot what you want easier.

/Yari
 
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RyuShiKan

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Originally posted by vin2k0
I've been studying karate now for 9 years and am wondering whether or not to try another art. I'm curious how it would compare to what i already know. Jujitsu seems appealing to me but how would i be starting from scratch if i am used to being knowledgable? Any help would be appreciated. What MA would you recommend me picking up? im know pretty much nothing about any other MA so thought id ask in here. Also, which art is a little more of a full-contact art?


9 years is not very long.
It takes most people about 8 years to get shodan.
I have tried/done many other arts.judo, kendo, naginata, sumo, jujutsu, etc.

If you are wanting to use more grabbing and throwing type moves karate already has them in itits called tutie.
My teacher actually coined this word by combing two languages. Okinawan tui and Japanese te. He didnt invent the art but was the person responsible for the word.
I find it kind of funny to hear karate people outside of my teachers organization use the word tuite when describing the grappling type art they practice since they never trained with my teacher.
This actually supports my ideas about people using martial buzz words like tuite, soke and the like with out actually knowing what they mean or where they come from.

AnywayzI trained in other arts not to become ranked in them but to try and understand how to use my art (Karate) against them.
It was interesting as well as helpful.
I recommend exposing yourself to other arts not necessarily to master them but to prepare yourself against them.

Know yourself and your enemy and in 100 battles you will be victorious
 
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silencethehero

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Originally posted by vin2k0
I've been studying karate now for 9 years and am wondering whether or not to try another art. I'm curious how it would compare to what i already know. Jujitsu seems appealing to me but how would i be starting from scratch if i am used to being knowledgable? Any help would be appreciated. What MA would you recommend me picking up? im know pretty much nothing about any other MA so thought id ask in here. Also, which art is a little more of a full-contact art?

Pick up Kempo. It will compliment your Karate and bring you to Jujutsu (the best martial art ever).
 
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RyuShiKan

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Originally posted by silencethehero
Pick up Kempo. It will compliment your Karate and bring you to Jujutsu (the best martial art ever).


"Best Martial Art ever"??? Really?
 
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Disco

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Since you have been in Karate for 9 years, and this is just a generalization, I assume that you would/should be proficient with the basic strikes, blocks and kicks. Any other style you choose to study should be nothing more than an adjunct to what you already know. Your basics have already been ingrained and you will undoubtedly respond to a situation with those movements. I will go out on a limb here and state that whatever style of MA that's out there, be it judo, jujitsu, hapkido, aikido etc, will all do the same thing when defending an attack. First either block or redirect the incoming attacking limb, inflict some type of offensive strike and then perform whatever specialized movement that the particular style dictates. With this stated, I would gravitate toward whatever MA style that personally interests you. It's a shame that your current style after 9 years does not fulfill your needs. Hope this was of some assistance to you:asian:
 
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A.R.K.

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I've been studying karate now for 9 years and am wondering whether or not to try another art.

I would be curious as to what type/style/system of karate you have been studying and what rank you have attained?

What skills do you feel your lacking. What area of interest would you like training in? Grappling, ground fighting, submission holds, joint locks etc?

This might help us narrow it down as to valid suggestions for you.

:asian:
 

moromoro

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since you have been doing karate for a while your movements are probably quite rigid why not try something more fluid in movement, i.e chinese martial arts,
or try some indian martail arts of kelari payyatu this art has every thing...


thanks

terry
 
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RyuShiKan

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Originally posted by moromoro
since you have been doing karate for a while your movements are probably quite rigid why not try something more fluid in movement, i.e chinese martial arts,
or try some indian martail arts of kelari payyatu this art has every thing...


thanks

terry


This is often a misconception of Karate that is said by people that are unfamiliar with the art.i.e. that it is rigid or stiff.
However nothing could be further from the truth.

Yiliquan1 is a Chinese MA practioner and has trained with mewhy not ask him if Karate is stiff or rigid.

Or you can have a look at some mpegs of people in our association.


Go to this link and to the section that says "GALERIA" then scroll down to the area that says "FILMIKI"

http://www.kempo.org.pl/ramka.html
 

moromoro

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i dont think its a misconception just a comparison to other arts,

for example theres no way that a karateka is as fluid as a boxer or as fluid as a JKD practitioner
in comparison to these arts karate has the stiffest movements even the great bruce lee said that.

thanks

terry
 
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MartialArtist

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Originally posted by vin2k0
I've been studying karate now for 9 years and am wondering whether or not to try another art. I'm curious how it would compare to what i already know. Jujitsu seems appealing to me but how would i be starting from scratch if i am used to being knowledgable? Any help would be appreciated. What MA would you recommend me picking up? im know pretty much nothing about any other MA so thought id ask in here. Also, which art is a little more of a full-contact art?
Try kyokushin karate, it's a little more "full-contact". Where you're from, I don't think there are a lot of full-contact schools anywhere in the world for that matter except for the very old areas. Full-contact schools are a dying breed due to difficulty, legal issues, financial reasons, etc. Not many people want to pay to get beat up. If they wanted that, they can pay that wacko on ebay to get an *** whopping. :rofl:

I have heard the muay thai schools were very good in the UK. You might also want to try out judo, it goes well with kyokushin I think.
 
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RyuShiKan

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Originally posted by moromoro
i dont think its a misconception just a comparison to other arts,

for example theres no way that a karateka is as fluid as a boxer or as fluid as a JKD practitioner in comparison to these arts karate has the stiffest movements even the great bruce lee said that.

thanks

terry

Not to be rude but you obviously havent been exposed to any good karate.

Look at the mpegs then comment.
 

Bob Hubbard

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Nice clips. What was the second one? looked like variations of an armbar, to a throw?

:asian:
 
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RyuShiKan

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Originally posted by Kaith Rustaz
Nice clips. What was the second one? looked like variations of an armbar, to a throw?

:asian:


I am not sure which one you are talking about......what was the mpeg size?
 
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MartialArtist

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Originally posted by moromoro
i dont think its a misconception just a comparison to other arts,

for example theres no way that a karateka is as fluid as a boxer or as fluid as a JKD practitioner
in comparison to these arts karate has the stiffest movements even the great bruce lee said that.

thanks

terry
It's true that karate is a bit "harder" than the other arts, but hard doesn't mean not fluid. That's the biggest misconception. Hard doesn't mean rigid in fighting. Not necessarily the best analogy, but an example would be bamboo. Hard, yet flexibile.

And there are a lot of boxing styles out there. Sugar Ray Robinson was poetry in motion. Ali floated like a butterfly. But then you got Lewis who is a bit rigid compared to them and stiff, but has no trouble going from one technique to the next. Butterbean is all rigid, but that's just because he's fat, lazy, and a person who can only fight under his own rules.
 

moromoro

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your right about one thing, LEWIS beign rigid, man all the guy has is reach i dont think he has good technique and speed or power like tyson or rahman
as far as karate beign like bamboo i dont know about that bruce said it was more like a metal bar!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

thanks

terry
 
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M

MartialArtist

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Another set of movies would be of Mas Oyama. He can be rigid, he can be graceful. A lot of his power movements are graceful in the near the beginning of execution then become rigid. When he fought certain people, it was a completely different person. And when he fought that bull, he was rigid and fluid...

But let's define rigid and fluid. You mention boxing as being fluid. Yeah, the footwork and bodymovement may be, and same with a lot of combos, but what about the certain blocks? Those aren't fluid and they take a lot of the impact. You cover your head, lean forward a bit, and try to defend yourself. By being rigid, you can defend against the all-out attacks instead of risking blocking it and getting it. Blocking outside may work for slower techniques but you can't expect to block all my punches if I went at it like that. You remain tense, but you still have to move. Then look at karate. There is more emphasis on parries than in boxing. Parries aren't rigid. So what's your point. Muay thai is more rigid than taiji, same with TKD.
 
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MartialArtist

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Originally posted by moromoro
your right about one thing, LEWIS beign rigid, man all the guy has is reach i dont think he has good technique and speed or power like tyson or rahman
as far as karate beign like bamboo i dont know about that bruce said it was more like a metal bar!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

thanks

terry
Lewis has reach, but that's not the reason he wins that many matches. One thing he specifically stated he did best was prepare for a bout. Preperation - his key to victory. Vitaly sp? I think it was (might be his brother) Klitchsko has a longer reach than Lewis, and I think he's the better boxer not due to reach, but because of his technical ability and greater speed than Lewis. But in terms of tactical ability - Lewis. Lewis spends a lot of his time reviewing his opponents. He knows your style, and he knows your strengths and weaknesses.
 

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