How many Ji Do Kwaners here

Manny

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Just wonder how many of you are from Ji Do Kwan roots or lineaje?

I'am a jido kwan tae kwondoing, my sambunim Ramon ALvite Gazca was one of the first Mexicans to learn Tae Kwond Do Ji Do Kwan from grand master An Dae Sup in 1967. Ramon Alvite emigrated form Mexico City to Veracruz (my city) around mid 70's I guess, I graduated from Jido Kwan in 1987.

Even today I train in other dojang/organizacion (Hwarang Tae Kwon Do) I'm still faithfull to my Ji Do Kwan roots,legacy and comitments and I'm still have my Jido Kwan patch in my heart.

I know Ji Do Kwan was one of the first Kwans in Korea back in 1945-46 and this dojan gave so much champions from 1960-1970's.

In the golden years of TKD in Mexico there was a fierce competition beetwen Moo Duk Kwan and Ji Do Kwan on tournaments.

Manny
 

dancingalone

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I can't claim membership, but we all know the Chung Do Kwan was the best anyway. :)
 

dancingalone

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Yes...best for being a punching bag of the JDK'ers. ;-) ha.ha.ha..

:) On the contrary, the CDK was so cool, only CDK black belts automatically got to keep their rank when joining the army. All the other kwans had to retake their BB exams to prove their inherent lack of limp-wristedness.
 

miguksaram

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:) On the contrary, the CDK was so cool, only CDK black belts automatically got to keep their rank when joining the army. All the other kwans had to retake their BB exams to prove their inherent lack of limp-wristedness.
Unfortunately that had more to do with Gen Choi being part of the CDK at that time. JDK was known for their fighters back in the day.
 

dancingalone

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Unfortunately that had more to do with Gen Choi being part of the CDK at that time. JDK was known for their fighters back in the day.

Don't be bitter that your emblem looks like a snowman colored with food-dye in the middle of a sunflower!:boing2:

(apologies to Manny for taking this thread off-course)

150px-Jidokwan_logo_red_blue_1.jpg
 
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Manny

Manny

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Don't be bitter that your emblem looks like a snowman colored with food-dye in the middle of a sunflower!:boing2:

(apologies to Manny for taking this thread off-course)

150px-Jidokwan_logo_red_blue_1.jpg


Well maybe not so martial (ej. the emblem with a fist) but JDK emblem has power inherently, the snow man is like a punching bag, every time you punch it or kick it and go to the floor it will return to his standing possition. This traslates to something like this: no matter how many times I will go down I will stand up!! This is in some way no surrender or quit.

Yes, is not a pretty emblem but it has character when you learn the meaning of it.

Manny
 

chrispillertkd

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I can't claim membership, but we all know the [size=+5]Oh Do Kwan[/size] was the best anyway. :)

Fixed for you :)

I don't claim Ji Do Kwan lineage, but while in college I trained for two years in a club whose Korean instructor had roots in the Ji Do Kwan. Good sparring, especially footwork drills.

Pax,

Chris
 

Daniel Sullivan

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According to the JDK website, the JDK wants its members to be practicing Kukkiwon taekwondo. At least that was the impression that I got. While being a member may be pretty cool, I really do not see any benefit to it other than simply being able to claim JDK membership and perhaps networking.

If there is any other benefit, I would be interested to know what it is.

Daniel
 

miguksaram

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According to the JDK website, the JDK wants its members to be practicing Kukkiwon taekwondo. At least that was the impression that I got. While being a member may be pretty cool, I really do not see any benefit to it other than simply being able to claim JDK membership and perhaps networking.

If there is any other benefit, I would be interested to know what it is.

Daniel

No you pretty much got it right. There are a lot of people who try to claim that they are practicing the way JDK is supposed to be, but as you said, the party line of the JDK is to be aligned with KKW standards. It is nice to know any of the older forms though. JDK is pretty much a social club if you will.
 

dancingalone

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No you pretty much got it right. There are a lot of people who try to claim that they are practicing the way JDK is supposed to be, but as you said, the party line of the JDK is to be aligned with KKW standards. It is nice to know any of the older forms though. JDK is pretty much a social club if you will.

Does anyone know if this is the case with all the kwans? It would be nice if some of them still kept at least a part of their old curriculums. I'm aware of GM Kim Soo preserving some of the Chang Moo Kwan forms in his Chayon-ryu system. And I suppose the Moo Duk Kwan people now are called Tang Soo Do and they still use the Japanese forms with slight differences.
 

chrispillertkd

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Actually, during the unification movement, Hwang Kee was onboard at first but later pulled the Moo Duk Kwan out and kept his organization separate. Some (many) of his senior instructors, however, wanted to join the Taekwon-Do movement and so there was a split. You now have Soo Bahk Do Moo Duk Kwan, headed by Hwang Kee and now by his son, and Taekwon-Do Moo Duk Kwan, that branch of Taekwon-Do that traces its origin back to this schism.

Of course, there are also those who are doing Tang Soo Do Moo Duk Kwan, i.e. they didn't join Taekwon-Do but split from Hwang Kee for differeing reasons.

Pax,

Chris
 

miguksaram

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Does anyone know if this is the case with all the kwans? It would be nice if some of them still kept at least a part of their old curriculums. I'm aware of GM Kim Soo preserving some of the Chang Moo Kwan forms in his Chayon-ryu system. And I suppose the Moo Duk Kwan people now are called Tang Soo Do and they still use the Japanese forms with slight differences.

Moodukkwan split into two fractions...ones who stayed with GM Hwang and ones that joined under the KKW unification process. Once they did they they dropped (or were supposed) the TSD forms in lieu of KKW prescribed forms.
 

dancingalone

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Moodukkwan split into two fractions...ones who stayed with GM Hwang and ones that joined under the KKW unification process. Once they did they they dropped (or were supposed) the TSD forms in lieu of KKW prescribed forms.

Yah. And now Soo Bakh Do people under GM Hwang's son are now increasingly emphasizing the newer forms GM Hwang created, to the point where some wonder if it time to drop the Japanese forms entirely.

howard said:
As a former ji do kwan student, I'm curious... which forms are you referring to as the "older forms"?

Howard, I imagine the Jidokwan used the same Heian forms from Shotokan that most of the other schools did. The Chang Moo Kwan had a few extra kwon bup sets that are still taught today in GM Kim Soo's Chayon-ryu system.
 

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