Fasting and the Martial Arts Mindset

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oftheherd1

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When I was at school in Aberdeen ( I wished we'd stayed in England at that point), the city got quarantined because of an outbreak of typhoid from Argentinian corned beef ( they were out to get us even then). We had 10 weeks school summer holidays that year, we all also got obsessed with hand washing because that was preached at us all the time.
They just need to wash their hands and cook the chicken properly...no you cannot have 'medium rare' chicken ..................

That sounds like a scary experience. My brother had that when I was young. In those days they would put people in quarantine people until they were cured.

I always marvel at those who are willing to eat rare chicken. That is at least as dangerous as rare pork (at least you needn't worry about that). I also marvel at those who eat rare beef. Singe the outside and that kills all the bacteria there, and none will be inside. No. There may still be bacteria or worms or other parasites under the outside that was singed.
 

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Whilst you are of course correct in your definition, tez is also correct, that here in the UK, there is a common demarcation between " fish" and to a lesser extent prawns, that are considered mainstream and everything else, jellied eels, welks cockels muscles etc that are considered a bit niche. So fish is fish everything Else is " seafood" in the popular vernacular,

Most people will eat a nice price of cod, a lot of people, including myself, won't touch " Sea food"( apart from a prawn cocktail.)

In Italy', I orderer something in " foreign " and was presented with a plate of whole baby octupus, I was physically sick just at the sight of it

What I wonder (but didn't express at all well) is if this is a matter of definition or just local convention. In much the same way that "cult" actually means all religions, but is used to mean 'religions I find offensive' or "idiot" means 'anyone driving slower than me' and "manic" means 'anyone driving faster than me.'
Because when I look up 'seafood' it definitely says it's anything from the sea that's considered food by humans.
 

jobo

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What I wonder (but didn't express at all well) is if this is a matter of definition or just local convention. In much the same way that "cult" actually means all religions, but is used to mean 'religions I find offensive' or "idiot" means 'anyone driving slower than me' and "manic" means 'anyone driving faster than me.'
Its the common use of language, ( round here) it doesn't fit the dictionary as far as I know, sea food can be a perjoritive term, like " cult"

In that I won't eat " sea food" pulls face of extreme disgust " I'll have a battered cod please"
 
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oftheherd1

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Whilst you are of course correct in your definition, tez is also correct, that here in the UK, there is a common demarcation between " fish" and to a lesser extent prawns, that are considered mainstream and everything else, jellied eels, welks cockels muscles etc that are considered a bit niche. So fish is fish everything Else is " seafood" in the popular vernacular,

Most people will eat a nice price of cod, a lot of people, including myself, won't touch " Sea food"( apart from a prawn cocktail.)

In Italy', I orderer something in " foreign " and was presented with a plate of whole baby octupus, I was physically sick just at the sight of it

Eating habits are cultural, or family, or personally controlled. If my wife put a plate like @Tez3 did in post 144, I would be content. I like both octopus tentacles (as long as it is cooked) and mussels. I can also enjoy whole baby octopus.

But I understand whose who cannot. I don't like pig's feet, which is a favored food for my wife and oldest daughter.
 

jobo

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Eating habits are cultural, or family, or personally controlled. If my wife put a plate like @Tez3 did in post 144, I would be content. I like both octopus tentacles (as long as it is cooked) and mussels. I can also enjoy whole baby octopus.

But I understand whose who cannot. I don't like pig's feet, which is a favored food for my wife and oldest daughter.
Pigs trotters, a local treat in the 1930s, now a bit niche. My daddy used to sit down to plate of tripe ( the lining of a cows stomach) and vinigar. No amount of cultural heritage would convince me to do like wise. Though a bury black pudding( congealed blood in a intestine) smothered in mustard is one of my favourites
 
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Dirty Dog

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Eating habits are cultural, or family, or personally controlled. If my wife put a plate like @Tez3 did in post 144, I would be content. I like both octopus tentacles (as long as it is cooked) and mussels. I can also enjoy whole baby octopus.

But I understand whose who cannot. I don't like pig's feet, which is a favored food for my wife and oldest daughter.

True enough, and this applies to a lot more than eating.
However, despite being Scottish, I still think the bagpipes sound like two cats mating in a vacuum cleaner.
 

oftheherd1

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Pigs trotters, a local treat in the 1930s, now a bit niche. My daddy used to sit down to plate of tripe ( the lining of a cows stomach) and vinigar. No amount of cultural heritage would convince me to do like wise. Though a bury black pudding( congealed blood in a intestine) smothered in mustard is one of my favourites

Tripe, beef or pig, I can enjoy boiled or grilled. Don't know about the mustard, but Koreans have a blood and rice in an intestine that I like. The Vietnamese had what I think was a beef blood side that tasted OK. They and the Koreans sometimes eat dog. I never ate that in Korea (who are more famous/notorious for it, but there was a gentleman in Vietnam who when he ate dog, I got a special invite.
 

Tez3

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Eating habits are cultural, or family, or personally controlled. If my wife put a plate like @Tez3 did in post 144, I would be content. I like both octopus tentacles (as long as it is cooked) and mussels. I can also enjoy whole baby octopus.

But I understand whose who cannot. I don't like pig's feet, which is a favored food for my wife and oldest daughter.


As Jews we don't eat certain things because we follow the laws of Kashrut which is the preparation of food and what we can eat. It's mostly a tradition now but still does have it's uses. It started out as food hygiene rules, pigs aren't animals that travel well if you have a nomadic lifestyle, the meat goes off quickly in the heat and until modern farming methods and veterinary practice would often contain worms. Sea food ie things like shell fish are never going to be fresh if you find them for sale in a desert country! They are also creatures that pick up pollution very quickly causing stomach problems for eaters. Storing dairy products and meat separately makes sense and is modern catering practice now.
In the UK you are for a sea food platter you will get what's in the picture I posted, the same for most of Europe. Here is an ad for companies, you'll see it says they have fish and seafood. Seafood Suppliers | Fish Wholesalers | Direct Seafoods
 

oftheherd1

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What I wonder (but didn't express at all well) is if this is a matter of definition or just local convention. In much the same way that "cult" actually means all religions, but is used to mean 'religions I find offensive' or "idiot" means 'anyone driving slower than me' and "manic" means 'anyone driving faster than me.'
Because when I look up 'seafood' it definitely says it's anything from the sea that's considered food by humans.

Well I agree that in the USA, seafood generally means what you define. But apparently not in other places. I guess we just have to continue teaching the Brits to speak proper English (quickly puts on flame suit with bullet proofing kit and runs as fast as possible to the self contained bomb shelter). :)

As to religions, I had to look it up to find that 400 years ago that was indeed a meaning for cult. But 400 years later, at least for me, since I had never heard that before, cult generally has a different meaning, with several things that define it. I understand there are different thoughts on what a cult (or New Religious Movement?) is, but I don't hold that just because a religion isn't the same as I believe, that it is a cult. Larsen's New Book Of The Cults has what I think is a good definition, but unfortunately I don't have a copy with me so I can't quote it.

I think Idiots and Manics are correctly defined by you. :p
 

oftheherd1

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Well I agree that in the USA, seafood generally means what you define. But apparently not in other places. I guess we just have to continue teaching the Brits to speak proper English (quickly puts on flame suit with bullet proofing kit and runs as fast as possible to the self contained bomb shelter). :)

As to religions, I had to look it up to find that 400 years ago that was indeed a meaning for cult. But 400 years later, at least for me, since I had never heard that before, cult generally has a different meaning, with several things that define it. I understand there are different thoughts on what a cult (or New Religious Movement?) is, but I don't hold that just because a religion isn't the same as I believe, that it is a cult. Larsen's New Book Of The Cults has what I think is a good definition, but unfortunately I don't have a copy with me so I can't quote it.

I think Idiots and Manics are correctly defined by you. :p

BTW, I should note that I don't agree with Larson's blanket statements about all he considers a cult. He lists martial arts as a cult. He seems to me to be describing Aikido, which even here at MT has some who recognize some aspects of Aikido as being religious. But I think he paints with too broad a brush. Apparently he knows little about MA in general. I of course only have experience with TKD and HKD. Those that I studied certainly had no religious aspects.
 

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I never heard of that but it sounds intriguing. Do you use a specific kind of onion?
My favorite kind of onion to use for this is Italian sweet red onion. A word of caution - it SPRAYS. Even if you use a super-sharp knife or a mandolin - it's very juicy. But that's what makes it so eminently suitable to make onion jam. Basically, thinly slice the onions, caramelize in olive oil, then season with salt and pepper to taste, and add a teaspoon of brown sugar or sugar in the raw for each onion (so, three onion - three teaspoons). For each onion, also add a tablespoon of red wine or red wine vinegar. Reduce heat to medium low and stir constantly. Cook until the onions are uniformly soft and, the juice is almost like a reduction - nice and goopy. Works great on burgers, steak, pork, or just on a toast.
 

hoshin1600

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BTW, I should note that I don't agree with Larson's blanket statements about all he considers a cult. He lists martial arts as a cult. He seems to me to be describing Aikido, which even here at MT has some who recognize some aspects of Aikido as being religious. But I think he paints with too broad a brush. Apparently he knows little about MA in general. I of course only have experience with TKD and HKD. Those that I studied certainly had no religious aspects.

if an outsider listened to students talk about their teacher or founder, it definitely sounds like a cult at times.
 

jobo

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I never heard of that but it sounds intriguing. Do you use a specific kind of onion?
don't forget that " jam" is one of the words Americans insist on misusing, they call jam - jelly, I'm not sure what they call jelly. I suspect the onion jam, is relish, rather than a pound of boiled strawberries with onion in ?

I was offered a jelly sandwich in the states, that I as any right thinking person would , declined, only to find out they meant a jam butty
 
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