andyscriven

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I have taught Karate and Muay Thai for many years and this drill has been really successful in teaching students different ways to use leg kicks.

The routine is 5 separate kicks put together in one flow drill. As it incorporates angles you can work in safe entry and exit from each move. You can add your own set ups and defenses, making it personal to your style.

Here is the link to the video on my youtube channel.

Let me know what you think

 

Kung Fu Wang

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Agree with 1 and 3 for:

- move "back" leg first.
- circle toward your opponent's "side door".
- move "away" from his back hand punch and back leg kick.

Dis-agree with 2, 4, and 5 for:

- move "front" leg first.
- circle toward your opponent's "front door".
- move "into" his back hand punch and back leg kick.

If your opponent's cannot kick/punch you in a certain distance, no matter how you may move your back foot, the distance between you two has not changed. The moment that you move your "front" foot, the moment that distance between you two may be reduced, when you try to reposition your front foot, your opponent can attack you right at that moment.
 
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Danny T

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Agree with 1 and 3 for:

- move "back" leg first.
- circle toward your opponent's "side door".
- move "away" from his back hand punch and back leg kick.

Dis-agree with 2, 4, and 5 for:

- move "front" leg first.
- circle toward your opponent's "front door".
- move "into" his back hand punch and back leg kick.

If your opponent's cannot kick/punch you in a certain distance, no matter how you may move your back foot, the distance between you two has not changed. The moment that you move your "front" foot, the moment that distance between you two may be reduced, when you try to reposition your front foot, your opponent can attack you right at that moment.
It's a drill and when used in application without set ups I'd agree with you.
Set ups are an important element and he did state; "...add your own set ups and defenses, making it personal to your style."
 

Kung Fu Wang

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add your own set ups ...
What kind of set ups can you do when you are outside of the kicking range?

When you are outside of the

- kicking range, your "footwork" can be your set up for your kick.
- punching range, your "kick" can be your set up for your punch.
- clinching range, your "punch" can be your set up for your clinch.
 

Danny T

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What kind of set ups can you do when you are outside of the kicking range?

When you are outside of the

- kicking range, your "footwork" can be your set up for your kick.
- punching range, your "kick" can be your set up for your punch.
- clinching range, your "punch" can be your set up for your clinch.
- Footwork...absolutely.
- Punches can set up kicks, knees, and elbows
- Kicks, punches, knees, and elbows can set up the clinch.
All are done with footwork but not with footwork alone as shown in the above drills
 

Kung Fu Wang

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IMO, a "complete instruction" video should have:

1. How to do low roundhouse kick.
2. How to counter low roundhouse kick.
3. How to counter those counters.

To alter the angle of your upper leg when taking a low roundhouse kick is important.


This remind me the Taiji "brush knee" that you catch your opponent's low roundhouse kick and push his shoulder back at the same time.

 

marques

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Thanks for sharing this video. I really enjoy round kicks and particularly leg kicks.

Would like to add that for the external leg kick we aim the ITB for maximum efficiency.
itband_605.jpg

So near the hip, it seems easier to reach (bigger target) but also easier to be grabbed and requires greater angle (lateral movement) to be reached. Above the knee doesn't require (as much) angle but easier to defend (just moving the knee a bit).

PS: I would step closer for the #5. Actually, I think I would do any movement shorter, but for teaching purposes I understand large movements are better.
 
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