A young first degree black belt opens a school...

girlbug2

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What do you think about first degree black belts opening their own schools? In your opinion, would a first degree have enough experience either as a martial artist or as a teacher to be doing this? Under what circumstances, if any,would you consider taking classes from him/her?

The reason I ask is because somebody I know is contemplating signing on with a school recently opened by a first degree jiu jitsu black belt. I know next to nothing about that art, so I can't advise. But it sends up a red flag to me that the sensei is relatively young and IMO, therefore inexperienced. Or perhaps I'm just being age-prejudiced?

Your thoughts?
 

terryl965

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Maybe he has alot more experience than a normal 1ST degre, I mean he could have been traing for twenty years and decided to start belt testing.
 

Gordon Nore

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The proof is on the mat. The teacher is not concealing the fact that he is a first dan. There are ways people can re-imagine themselves as grand sokes with multiple stripes and all the rest. Is he teaching a good program? Can students advance to a teacher who can promote them to a dan if they've earned the right to grade?

My teachers were first dans. We had a ten-year time in grade to black belt. By the time I got there, my teachers were still ten years more experienced than I.
 

bluekey88

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It depends on the style of jiu itsu...in brazilian jiu jitsu...blue belt is a teaching level (equivalent to 1st dan in most other styles)...so a !st dan in BJJ has a LOT of expereince. Then againb, other styles woudl be different. I'd say judge more by the teaching and technical skills of the instructor.

Peace,
Erik
 

Gordon Nore

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It depends on the style of jiu itsu...in brazilian jiu jitsu...blue belt is a teaching level (equivalent to 1st dan in most other styles)...so a !st dan in BJJ has a LOT of expereince. Then againb, other styles woudl be different. I'd say judge more by the teaching and technical skills of the instructor.

Peace,
Erik

Good point. I know of a couple of BJJ blue belts who run schools and bring students up to the intermediate ranks.
 

seasoned

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I believe a solid set of standards, out weights a strong desire, in many instances. To teach someone the rudimentary techniques of karate can be done by a 1st degree black belt. To truly convey the arts in a mature, concise, in-depth manner would take an individual with the type of insight and experience only time can produce. In this case, I am not talking about the 10 year old black belt, that at 21 years old has 10 years under their belt. I am talking about an individual that has tasted of life, and has much to contribute to the growth of a student populace willing to spend their hard earned money in a quest, an education if you will, not only in technique, but of personal growth, that only a seasoned practitioner can accomplish.
 
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girlbug2

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It depends on the style of jiu itsu...in brazilian jiu jitsu...blue belt is a teaching level (equivalent to 1st dan in most other styles)...so a !st dan in BJJ has a LOT of expereince. Then againb, other styles woudl be different. I'd say judge more by the teaching and technical skills of the instructor.

Peace,
Erik

Yes, it's BJJ.

I suppose my reservations were groundless.

But in other styles, I still think it would be weird for a newly-promoted BB to start their own school.
 

J Ellis

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You might also consider the art such a person is teaching. If there are a dozen schools (and hopefully at least a few competent ones) teaching the same art in the immediate area, why would a first dan open a school? On the other hand, there may be nothing like it in the area, and he simply wishes to share the art while continuing to train and progress himself.

Teaching experience is a requirement for rank advancement in some systems. This may be his only option.

I'm not defending any specific situation, just suggesting a few other possibilities that ought to be considered.

Joel
 

Tames D

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I wouldn't care if he's still in diapers, as long as he can impress me with his fighting abilities and transfer those abilities through teaching, I'm On Board.
 

seasoned

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Many people can look at the same anything and conclude a different perception. I guess as long as each is happy in their own right, so be it.
 

ArmorOfGod

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In BJJ, blue belt is what us karate guys would consider a first degree black belt. As Arnisodor just stated, BJJ blue belts can open their own schools and it takes around 10 years typically to get a black belt in bjj.
Compare that to tons of karate and tkd schools where it can take 2 years to get a black belt.
Bottom line: in bjj, a first degree black belt can defenitely open a school.
If it were karate or tkd, I personally would say it is a bad idea.

AoG
 

Tez3

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As the others have said BJJ blue belts will be more than able instructors, is the black belt a Brazilian? I ask because we have a few Brazilian black belt as well as blue belt instructors here and they are all awesome. In Brazil they seem to take their namesake juijitsu very seriously and have a great deal of experience teaching and competing.
 

Grenadier

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Yes, it's BJJ.

No worries, then. There are purple belts who have their own schools, since that's similar to having a nidan in other Ju Jutsu systems. Many brown belts also have schools, too.

But in other styles, I still think it would be weird for a newly-promoted BB to start their own school.

Not entirely. As long as the instructor is working with the limitations of his abilities, then there shouldn't be a problem here.

For example, a shodan in most Karate systems could certainly be trusted to teach Karate to those who are under black belt, with the understanding that any students who wish to become shodan or higher, would have to take their exams with a higher up instructor.

Of course, by that time, if the shodan instructor has been training long enough to have his or her students coming up for shodan, then they should be coming up on nidan, as well.
 

MJS

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What do you think about first degree black belts opening their own schools? In your opinion, would a first degree have enough experience either as a martial artist or as a teacher to be doing this? Under what circumstances, if any,would you consider taking classes from him/her?

The reason I ask is because somebody I know is contemplating signing on with a school recently opened by a first degree jiu jitsu black belt. I know next to nothing about that art, so I can't advise. But it sends up a red flag to me that the sensei is relatively young and IMO, therefore inexperienced. Or perhaps I'm just being age-prejudiced?

Your thoughts?

IMHO, anytime you decide to invest in something, it is very wise to do your homework. Watching a few classes, perhaps taking a few free classes, asking about his/her background, etc., are all key things.

Someone mentioned age, and again, IMO, I think that the person should be mature enough for the rank. You said the person appears to be in their 20s and I doubt you're going to find many places that have kids running the school anyways, so sure, if you're interested, give it a look. :)

After reading more of this thread, I see that its a BJJ school. From what I've seen and heard, the timeframes are alot longer than your average MA school, so I would say he's probably got some good knowledge.

For me, its not so much the rank, but how well the person understands the material, how well they can teach and apply it. Just because the person has X color around their waist doesnt mean anything.
 
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