Why do people think grappling arts always beat striking arts?

Kung Fu Wang

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Might work. Might not. Nothing is guaranteed.
As I have said, if a wrestler doesn't know any striking art and has to deal with a boxer (no kicking involved), this is the best strategy that he can come up with.

Keegan-rhino.gif
 

Dirty Dog

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I see this a lot lately and most of it does come from the mixed martial arts, UFC fan base and to be honest. (Not referring to this forum) I am getting very tired of it, yeah I get the gracie's have their videos of them beating people from multiple styles. Then they use that as some form of crucible that bjj is the best thing ever and everything sucks in comparison.

When in reality what the videos prove is that, hey this family is very talented at what they do. Good for them, in fact that is a very great thing for them, but even they lose sometimes.

I will admit when I had to just wrestle with friends, meaning no striking. I did terrible, then they would say oh what happened to your kenpo? My response was ok want to spar then? They immediately said no which of course was because they don't want to get hit.

People are more prone to wanting to try wrestling arts compared to something where you strike eachother for this reason it seems. Then I got into higher belts in kenpo and they started showing us Judo, and my hate for grappling, or rather dislike for being in such close contact (hugging and rolling) with others went away.

I then realized that I like both, in fact I love them both, I have my preferences sure. I prefer to punch lock and elbow but that moment I tossed someone to the ground for the first time I thought to myself "whoa! I did that!?" Then the Sihing smacked me for standing there dumbfounded and ordered me to do the rest of the technique.

Anyway I had a little too much of my medication so thats why this is long winded. My point is I guess the grappler does not have some rock paper scissors advantage, just because he or she is a grappler. In fact they might be at a disadvantage vs a very talented striker becuase after all, you have to close that gap to grab them and be quick enough to grab a limb.

It is also risky as you can take a mean hit to the face, ribs ect when you are trying to land that grab or takedown. So because of this inherit disadvantage of reach, and after all, it can only take a few or even one good hit to the head and you are done. Why all this attitude of grappling art is better than a striking art?

It is a case of ignorance?
Because people are silly.
 

Gerry Seymour

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When your arm make contact on a rhino guard, that rhino guard will change into octopus arms and try to wrap your arms. So the rhino guard and octopus arms are usually integrated.

We are talking about the missing link between the striking art and the grappling art. IMO, both "rhino guard" and "octopus arms" can fill into that missing area.
Hard to tangle with arms when the other guy is to the outside of your arm, which is really the only place he can be if he's slipping the rhino guard. Your arms can only bend inward or upward, and there's no reason to have contact with the arms in either of those directions.
 

Kung Fu Wang

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Hard to tangle with arms when the other guy is to the outside of your arm, which is really the only place he can be if he's slipping the rhino guard. Your arms can only bend inward or upward, and there's no reason to have contact with the arms in either of those directions.
Not sure I can picture this. Could you provide more detail?
 

Gerry Seymour

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Not sure I can picture this. Could you provide more detail?
Rhino guard comes at you. You slip to either side and push block (basically, laying a hand against the outside of the arm closest to you, to keep it from following). Now, the guy changes to octopus arms, but you're positioned outside his elbow, so he has few options for grabbing. You could also replace that push-block with a strike to the arm, if you have a strike that would be effective at that angle.
 

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Rhino guard comes at you. You slip to either side and push block (basically, laying a hand against the outside of the arm closest to you, to keep it from following). Now, the guy changes to octopus arms, but you're positioned outside his elbow, so he has few options for grabbing. You could also replace that push-block with a strike to the arm, if you have a strike that would be effective at that angle.

Straight right lead, check hook, and keep moving around the outside his lead leg.
 

Kung Fu Wang

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Rhino guard comes at you. You slip to either side and push block (basically, laying a hand against the outside of the arm closest to you, to keep it from following). Now, the guy changes to octopus arms, but you're positioned outside his elbow, so he has few options for grabbing. You could also replace that push-block with a strike to the arm, if you have a strike that would be effective at that angle.
When your right arm contacts the outside of my right arm, that's the time my rhino guard will change into reverse arm hold. This will move me from your right side door into your front door.

 

Gerry Seymour

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When your right arm contacts the outside of my right arm, that's the time my rhino guard will change into reverse arm hold. This will move me from your right side door into your front door.

That assumes I"m standing waiting for that. Remember that the point was to get to the outside and strike. The hand on the arm is just so you can't turn the rhino guard to put it in my way. And your hands are both together in front of you (now beside me). My hands are closer to their targets, for either striking or grappling, because you have to come over your own arm (the one my hand is on can't move to the outside to grab. Reaching over your own arm to grab is a weak movement and has short range (to evade, the hand only has to move back a few inchest. You'd be better off simply moving to change the angle.
 

Flying Crane

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For starters, striking involves hitting someone with your fist, whereas with grappling, you're hitting someone with the planet.
Um存ometimes. Like when you are doing a hard, slamming throw. Lots and lots of grappling does not involve this.

lets be clear: regardless of what you may believe is the strongest/hardest strike that can be delivered, you dont need it. You dont even need to hit harder than your enemy. You only need to be able to hit hard enough to be effective, and that can be less hard than your enemy. So even if one method is stronger/harder than another, it does not mean it is the only effective method.
Lastly, almost all striking arts lack any defence against grapplers.
Really? Youve trained most all striking arts? So you know this to be true? Or did you just read it on the internet somewhere so you believe it? Seriously, use your head a little.
Grappling is an al-rounder: perfect regardless of whether your opponent is taller, smaller, faster, or stronger.
Nonsense. You make these broad, sweeping generalizations that cannot be supported.
A proffessional striker will almost always get caught by a punch from an amateur fighter, even if their skill and experience far outweighs that of the amateur's. But grappling is methodical. There is no such thing as "lucky takes" or "lucky takedowns".
Again, nonsense. Seriously, I dont know where you get your ideas. A skilled striker will always get hit by a lucky shot from an unskilled opponent? In grappling there is never a lucky takedown? Nothing you say here makes sense or can be substantiated.
 
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Ironbear24

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First unexpected strike is most dangerous. I always keep my right hand near my stomach, put the left elbow in the right palm, and touch the chin by my left fingers. This pose is like I think about something, but factually I am in the perfect defensive position. A couple of times it helped me in my life.
Can you provide a visual example of this?
 
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Ironbear24

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When your right arm contacts the outside of my right arm, that's the time my rhino guard will change into reverse arm hold. This will move me from your right side door into your front door.

Octopus strategy?
 

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Neither is better than the other. If you've learned one it makes sense to study the other as well. You don't want any blind spots in your defenses. Of course you could always study a system that teaches striking and grappling, it doesn't have to be either/or.
 
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