What do you call an art that integrates striking and grappling?

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There is another discussion I want to have, but before I get to that discussion, I need some help with terminology. Or maybe opinions if there isn't an agreed-upon fact.

What do you call it when an art mixes striking and grappling techniques? Not like MMA, which typically will either strike in order to set up a take-down, or when stalemated in the grapple will throw some punches for points. But arts which use grappling to isolate your opponent's limbs and then attack from an advantaged position?

For example, using an arm lock to tie up one of your opponent's arms and keep the other arm pointed away from you, so that you can strike with your free arm unimpeded.

I've seen this kind of thing in the self defense portion of a more traditional Taekwondo class, and I've seen it in Kung Fu, Wing Chun and various Karate tutorials. I've seen the concept in Hapkido and Aikido (although usually a strike isn't thrown from there).

It kind of also applies to the Muay-Thai clinch, although that is a slightly different application than the others on my mind.

But back to my question - is there a name for this concept? We have "striking" and "grappling", but what about the concept of using one to break your opponent's structure, with which to allow you to use the other?
 

Danny T

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I thought chin na was specifically joint locks/standing grappling, not striking and grappling?
Chin na is a part of most all Chinese arts and not exclusive to locking. Just as locks, breaks, takedowns are in other martial arts. While there are some arts exclusive to strikes or grappling most aren't. Brazilian Jiu Jitsu has striking yet is considered a grappling art, Judo has striking in it but most don't train it because it isn't allowed in competition. Every kali system I've seen has grappling as a part of its system. Boxing has grappling in it.
 

wab25

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What do you call it when an art mixes striking and grappling techniques?
But back to my question - is there a name for this concept? We have "striking" and "grappling", but what about the concept of using one to break your opponent's structure, with which to allow you to use the other?
I would call such an art "Complete," as it looks at both aspects striking and grappling and most importantly, how the two are connected.
 

TSDTexan

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I would call such an art "Complete," as it looks at both aspects striking and grappling and most importantly, how the two are connected.
or Comprehensive vs specialist arts
 

Martial D

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There is another discussion I want to have, but before I get to that discussion, I need some help with terminology. Or maybe opinions if there isn't an agreed-upon fact.

What do you call it when an art mixes striking and grappling techniques? Not like MMA, which typically will either strike in order to set up a take-down, or when stalemated in the grapple will throw some punches for points. But arts which use grappling to isolate your opponent's limbs and then attack from an advantaged position?

For example, using an arm lock to tie up one of your opponent's arms and keep the other arm pointed away from you, so that you can strike with your free arm unimpeded.

I've seen this kind of thing in the self defense portion of a more traditional Taekwondo class, and I've seen it in Kung Fu, Wing Chun and various Karate tutorials. I've seen the concept in Hapkido and Aikido (although usually a strike isn't thrown from there).

It kind of also applies to the Muay-Thai clinch, although that is a slightly different application than the others on my mind.

But back to my question - is there a name for this concept? We have "striking" and "grappling", but what about the concept of using one to break your opponent's structure, with which to allow you to use the other?
MMA.

I know you said 'not MMA cause this' but 'this' is more how MMA fighting works. It's not strike to grapple and grapple to strike. Nobody does that.
 

Kung Fu Wang

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is there a name for this concept?
I call it combat Shuai Chiao (or San Da).

combat-SC.jpg
 
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MMA.

I know you said 'not MMA cause this' but 'this' is more how MMA fighting works. It's not strike to grapple and grapple to strike. Nobody does that.

I have plenty of examples of arts where I've seen this strategy used. I don't think "nobody does that".
 

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I think any art with striking and grappling, including MMA, uses one to set up the other and vice versa. So, call it whatever you want, really. Call it "Frank."

For what it's worth, there are tons of examples within MMA of using grappling to establish a dominant position for striking (not just one to set up the other, and/or doing one only when a stalemate occurs). "Ground and Pound" is a prime example. The entire point of ground and pound is get the other guy to the ground, establish a dominant position to isolate their limbs so that they cannot defend, and then punch it many times. But there are more specific examples, as well, within ground and pound. Ivan Salaverry was a master of establishing a strong side mount and then beating the crap out of guys from that position. Crucifix position is a great way to literally lock down the opponent's arms. In the clinch (which is grappling), you can isolate the arms to throw short punches or elbows. Guys will strike to set up the takedown, and vice versa, feinting a takedown to set up a strike. It's really all over the map in every possible permutation.

Other styles do this to a lesser degree, but the integration of striking and grappling is a true art form in MMA. And no one does it better, in my opinion, than Demetrious Johnson.
 
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I should have said "tactic" instead of "art" but I couldn't edit the title after I posted.
 

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There is another discussion I want to have, but before I get to that discussion, I need some help with terminology. Or maybe opinions if there isn't an agreed-upon fact.

What do you call it when an art mixes striking and grappling techniques? Not like MMA, which typically will either strike in order to set up a take-down, or when stalemated in the grapple will throw some punches for points. But arts which use grappling to isolate your opponent's limbs and then attack from an advantaged position?

For example, using an arm lock to tie up one of your opponent's arms and keep the other arm pointed away from you, so that you can strike with your free arm unimpeded.

I've seen this kind of thing in the self defense portion of a more traditional Taekwondo class, and I've seen it in Kung Fu, Wing Chun and various Karate tutorials. I've seen the concept in Hapkido and Aikido (although usually a strike isn't thrown from there).

It kind of also applies to the Muay-Thai clinch, although that is a slightly different application than the others on my mind.

But back to my question - is there a name for this concept? We have "striking" and "grappling", but what about the concept of using one to break your opponent's structure, with which to allow you to use the other?
Self Defense and/or Martial Arts
 

Martial D

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I have plenty of examples of arts where I've seen this strategy used. I don't think "nobody does that".
Just saying, the reason you excluded MMA is mostly how MMA is done. The idea that people in MMA aren't using one to set up the other constantly just tells me you've never trained with MMA guys :p
 

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