Which art if your knees are busted

Bruno@MT

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My best friend would like to get back into MA, but his knees are totally busted due to the combination of genetic disposition (shape of the joints) and bad karate training.

He tried kendo a couple of years ago, but that didn't work out well for him.

So we were wondering: are there any martial arts that are gentle on the knees? It doesn't have to be unarmed if need be. I thought of Bo as one possibility, but perhaps there are other options?
 

mook jong man

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I'd say the Art of Diplomacy, because you can't kick and you sure as hell can't run . :lfao:

But seriously , he might want to try Wing Chun , he doesn't have to kick if he doesn't want to.

He could use a modified stance where he doesn't sink down as much , and maybe not have his feet pidgeon toed.
The hand techniques by themselves are more than enough for most self defence situations .
 

Carol

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Ouch. I've had orthopaedic issues since birth...I can relate.

American Kenpo may be an option. Kenpo is largely performed in an upright stances and while it does incorporate some kicking, most of the work is done with the upper body.

Some of the Japanese Jujutsu lineages may work as well.

Look for a school that has very good quality mats, as this will soften the impact on his knees. Also, if your friend does visit some schools, have him ask the instructor if s/he has trained a student with knee problems before. An experienced teacher will be less likely to push your friend through something he knows will hurt his knees.
 

Sigung86

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Yang style Tai Chi Chuan is a viable alternative, although the self defense part won't be so quick in coming if your friend attends a traditional school.
 
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Bruno@MT

Bruno@MT

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Thanks all. He wants to do MA for the sake of it. Not for specific self defense scenarios. So Arnis or Escrima or Bo are all perfectly good choices.
Asking teachers if they have experience with knee injured patients is also a good idea.
 

Ken Morgan

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Jodo is done standing up, at least till you get to Koryu, even then you dont need to learn koryu to get to 8th Dan.

Iaido. We have quite a few people practicing whos knees are shot, they practice everything standing up. Generally not an issue, just get your *** out on the floor.
 

geezer

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My best friend would like to get back into MA, but his knees are totally busted...

So we were wondering: are there any martial arts that are gentle on the knees?

Mook and Stickarts are right on the money. I'd consider Wing Tsun/Chun and Arnis/Eskrima/Kali.

My legs are whack. I have congenital bone fusions in my ankles and I've had multiple serious injuries to both legs, including a spiral fracture of the left tibia and fibula, and open knee surgery/ACL replacement on the right. My joints hurt and make odd noises. Seiza posture is impossible for me as are deep horse stances and high kicks. Hell, sometimes it's hard to walk down stairs after sitting awhile, if I don't warm-up first.

I do enjoy practicing Wing Tsun and Eskrima. I go at it pretty hard. I have modified my stances a bit and avoid a few techniques that stress my knees, but I don't feel that my injuries hold me back much in these arts... and they are fighting arts. In fact, I would have more difficulty with Tai Chi. My ankle and knee problems make it impossible for me to "sink" without my heels lifting off the ground.

But, these are the arts I'd choose even if I were in perfect condition. So, I guess I'm really pretty lucky. In spite of my joint issues, I'm able to practice the arts of my choice. I hope your friend can also find a way to pursue his passions.
 

Tensei85

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This is my opinion maybe he should check into Taiji & Qigong to help with knee ailments for a year or so and see if it helps then try whatever low impact arts that were aforementioned.

On a side note: he may also check into Acupuncture & other Chinese Medicines to aid with Qigong training.

Actually my dad had a knee replacement, he also suffers from blood clots in his legs so Taiji worked out great! He started in Wing Chun & TKD but soon had to give it up.
But as with anything these arts can be tailored to fit the students needs based on a good instructors knowledge.

So best of luck!
 

Tensei85

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However just to clarify some Taiji systems may not be best suited unless modified such as Chen style which has a lot of low stance changes.

So its best to check around and speak to the Sifu & see what they have to say some things can be modified. (But at the same time I feel there is a reason for being, so it may not be best to modify everything)
 

MJS

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Kenpo, Arnis, Tai Chi are a few things that come to mind.
 

arnisador

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Stay away from Judo, BJJ, etc.

WC can still be hard on the knees with the traditional stance.

JKD? FMA?
 

shihansmurf

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What are his goals in training? Fitness, self-defence, cultural immersion? Those will have a huge impact on the art that will fit him.

I would recommend boxing. The sweet science doen't use the legs as attacking tools, is a great work out, is effective as a form of self-defence,and frankly is a lot of fun.

The cardio could be a problem with his knees, but there are lots of low-impact ways to train cardio.

Boxing.

Mark
 

Guardian

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I have had students with knee issues still do well in Modern Arnis.


Never taken this, but it and ones similar to it would seem to be a perfect fit for those with knee problems considering most other arts require some type of kicking whether it's low, med or high.
 

Carol

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Never taken this, but it and ones similar to it would seem to be a perfect fit for those with knee problems considering most other arts require some type of kicking whether it's low, med or high.

Its not always a perfect fit. Depending on how the styles are taught, there are Arnis/Kali/Escrima moves that involve operating out of deep stances. This can be very difficult for a person with bad knees.
 

MacLaddy

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I haven't even decided what I am going to sign up for yet, so I don't really know jack. However, it seems to me that Aikido might be a good option. I don't think I've ever seen Steven Seagal move his lower body.

Just a thought.
 
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