Well, dang. Diabetes.

elder999

El Oso de Dios!
Lifetime Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2005
Messages
9,929
Reaction score
1,451
Location
Where the hills have eyes.,and it's HOT!
That's a tough break. Fact is, though, that at our age, we are closer and closer to what the docs call "a life altering medical event". Diabetes is yours-your life is going to change, and hopefully in some positive ways-as in diet. I've lately been of the opinion that most of America could stand to eat as though we're diabetics. A healthy diet is key to a healthy life.

Fact is, you've shown that you've got what it takes to live with this, and even beat it down. I'm sure you'll be back in the dojo shortly-the doctor is going to like that you work out, once your blood-sugar is under control.....
 
OP
Bill Mattocks

Bill Mattocks

Sr. Grandmaster
MTS Alumni
Joined
Feb 8, 2009
Messages
15,730
Reaction score
4,650
Location
Michigan
That's a tough break. Fact is, though, that at our age, we are closer and closer to what the docs call "a life altering medical event". Diabetes is yours-your life is going to change, and hopefully in some positive ways-as in diet. I've lately been of the opinion that most of America could stand to eat as though we're diabetics. A healthy diet is key to a healthy life.

Fact is, you've shown that you've got what it takes to live with this, and even beat it down. I'm sure you'll be back in the dojo shortly-the doctor is going to like that you work out, once your blood-sugar is under control.....

I went to the dojo last night, just to give them a heads up that I could not work out - so they didn't think I fell off the edge of the earth or something. I have to tell you, my dojo is small, it feels like home there, my sensei's feel like family.

It was a 'light' night - three teaching black belts and me - but of course I could not work out. One of my sensei's just about brought tears to my eyes. He was mad at the doctor who told me not to work out until my blood sugar is under control. He yelled "Dammit, maddog, doesn't that doctor know you lost this much weight because you've been busting your *** in the dojo for the past six months? Doesn't he know how hard you've worked? I've watched you, and nobody works harder and pushes it more than you do!" Well, it felt good to hear, even if I can't take credit for my massive weight loss - it's all due to the diabetes. I can't give up my dojo-mates and my second home. It's all part of me now.
 

Xue Sheng

All weight is underside
Joined
Jan 8, 2006
Messages
34,538
Reaction score
9,806
Location
North American Tectonic Plate
I went to the dojo last night, just to give them a heads up that I could not work out - so they didn't think I fell off the edge of the earth or something. I have to tell you, my dojo is small, it feels like home there, my sensei's feel like family.

It was a 'light' night - three teaching black belts and me - but of course I could not work out. One of my sensei's just about brought tears to my eyes. He was mad at the doctor who told me not to work out until my blood sugar is under control. He yelled "Dammit, maddog, doesn't that doctor know you lost this much weight because you've been busting your *** in the dojo for the past six months? Doesn't he know how hard you've worked? I've watched you, and nobody works harder and pushes it more than you do!" Well, it felt good to hear, even if I can't take credit for my massive weight loss - it's all due to the diabetes. I can't give up my dojo-mates and my second home. It's all part of me now.

Bill

Some of your weight loss is diabetes... but the rest... is all you my friend and how hard you worked at it... don't forget that.
 

CoryKS

Senior Master
Joined
Aug 30, 2006
Messages
4,403
Reaction score
183
Location
Olathe, KS
Sorry to hear it, Bill. Take care of yourself, and do the things you gotta do.

Diabetes has to be the most confusing illness. Too much sugar, not enough sugar? I know that obese people are susceptible to it, now I learn that it causes weight loss? Will the weight loss mitigate the symptoms? One of the contestants on The Biggest Loser had diabetes but went off his meds at the end, I think. Maybe it depends what type it is.
 

teekin

3rd Black Belt
Joined
Jul 24, 2008
Messages
905
Reaction score
51
Location
Winterpeg
Bill, Type I or Type II ? Do you need to inject insulin and do blood test 3-4 x a day? I'm guessing this is Type II. Have you lost much muscle mass? Have you passed out, become ketonic?
lori
 

Live True

Brown Belt
Joined
Nov 23, 2007
Messages
486
Reaction score
47
Location
Palmyra, VA
Dang Bill...i can feel your pain truly, as I too am a diabetic. I actually find my practice helps to keep my blood sugars in control (with diet and proper meds, of course). For me, we hope that losing weight will eventually help me get off medication and still keep good control of my blood sugars.

I would talk to your doctor about why he advised you to stop going to the dojo, and if you can do light training until you get your sugar levels more under control. Most of the research I've read points to exercise as an important component in maintaining a healthy blood sugar. So, I'm wondering if he's concerned about trauma (diabetics can heal slower, particularly in lower extermities).

Definately educate yourself and ask LOTS of questions. Make sure your doctor understands what you do in your training, so you will know what specific things he has concerns. Then educate, read, and educate yourself some more.

Also, eventhough it can be a pain, do check your blood sugars regularly, so you can get a good grip on what causes your sugars to rise. There are some obvious things (sugar laden sodas, lots of candy, orange juice). I've noticed,for me, that immediately after workouts and for about 15-30 min, my blood sugar will spike, and then it will drop. This makes sense as your body uses glucose stores for energy. But if I just took my sugar at that one time, I'd falsely belive that exercies raises my blood sugar. It actually lowers it, once that initial spike is past.

Anywho, my long winded way of saying consult your doctor, but also do your own research...ASK QUESTIONS and don't get discouraged...this is something you can live with and move past.

Good luck, and feel free to pm me on this anytime. I'm not an expert, but I can share my own experiences. Glad to help if I can!
 
OP
Bill Mattocks

Bill Mattocks

Sr. Grandmaster
MTS Alumni
Joined
Feb 8, 2009
Messages
15,730
Reaction score
4,650
Location
Michigan
Bill, Type I or Type II ? Do you need to inject insulin and do blood test 3-4 x a day? I'm guessing this is Type II. Have you lost much muscle mass? Have you passed out, become ketonic?
lori

Don't know yet, but I suspect Type II, as the doctor told me over the phone last night that he expects we can control it with pills. But he was supposed to call me today with the results of the blood work, and he hasn't. So I do not know which type it is yet. I have lost some muscle mass, but as I was lifting weights and so on, not much. I have not passed out or become ketonic, but I have muscle cramps in my calves and feet, and my fingertips are numb, and I have blurred vision.
 

Live True

Brown Belt
Joined
Nov 23, 2007
Messages
486
Reaction score
47
Location
Palmyra, VA
and if you don't know what Lori is asking:
type I is commonly called insulin dependent or juvenile onset diabetes
this is typically caused by failure to produce enough insulin
type II is commonly called adult onset or non insulin dependent diabetes
this is typically caused by insulin resistance (you make enough, but your body doesn't utilize it properly...often due to weight and similar causes)

you had some of the classic symptoms of diabetes, btw!


good explation of ketones from WebMD
A ketone test checks for ketones in your blood or urine. Ketones are substances that are made when the body breaks down fat for energy. Normally, your body gets the energy it needs from carbohydrate in your diet. However, stored fat is broken down and ketones are made if your diet does not contain enough carbohydrate to supply the body with sugar (glucose) for energy or if your body cannot use blood sugar (glucose) properly.[...] It is recommended for all people with diabetes whenever symptoms of illness are present, such as nausea, vomiting, or abdominal pain. These symptoms are similar to symptoms of high blood sugar and may mean you have diabetic ketoacidosis, a potentially life-threatening condition.

Diabetic ketoacidosis is bad, and your doctor probably tested for that if he was suspicious that you were diabetic.

But these are all good things to learn and discuss with your doctor!
 
OP
Bill Mattocks

Bill Mattocks

Sr. Grandmaster
MTS Alumni
Joined
Feb 8, 2009
Messages
15,730
Reaction score
4,650
Location
Michigan
I would talk to your doctor about why he advised you to stop going to the dojo, and if you can do light training until you get your sugar levels more under control.

We only talked briefly on the phone last night and he suggested that I not do strenuous exercise until we get my blood sugar levels under control - I'm not medicated at the moment, I was just diagnosed yesterday. He did not say I had to quit doing MA, thank goodness. At this point, I do not have more information than this, and I'm not going to push it or go against Dr's orders. He said no, so it is 'no' until I get to sit down with him and talk about it.

Thanks for the offer of advice, I appreciate it!
 
OP
Bill Mattocks

Bill Mattocks

Sr. Grandmaster
MTS Alumni
Joined
Feb 8, 2009
Messages
15,730
Reaction score
4,650
Location
Michigan
It is recommended for all people with diabetes whenever symptoms of illness are present, such as nausea, vomiting, or abdominal pain.

Yes, I've had none of these symptoms. Also, instead of an appetite increase, my appetite has decreased markedly. So far my symptoms have consisted of 50 lb or so weight loss (in two months), huge thirst and frequent urination, along with leg and calf cramps, blurred vision, and in the past couple days, numbness in my fingertips. I've lost so much weight, my wedding ring won't stay on, and my fingertips are pruned like I just got out of a long bath.

I suspect it is also affecting my psoriasis, as it is starting to spread, which it had not done for a decade.
 

teekin

3rd Black Belt
Joined
Jul 24, 2008
Messages
905
Reaction score
51
Location
Winterpeg
The good news is Type II is very not only very controllable but reversible to a great extent. Your lifestyle is going to change but you'll be eating a lot healthier and feeling a lot better.:cheers: No worries Dude, you're tough!
Lori
 

Kembudo-Kai Kempoka

Senior Master
Joined
Mar 9, 2004
Messages
2,228
Reaction score
113
Location
Dana Point, CA
The good news is Type II is very not only very controllable but reversible to a great extent. Your lifestyle is going to change but you'll be eating a lot healthier and feeling a lot better.:cheers: No worries Dude, you're tough!
Lori

Correct. The standard medical approach is to say "once you got it, you always got it", and that healing it is not an option...only controlling it. Meanwhile, lotsa folks not in agreement with that perspective have somehow, magically, managed to send it into permanent remission...cuz we can't say "healed".

Some great books and sites out there, and some alternatives worth looking into. But, as always, it's each persons choice how they choose to manage their situation.

Be well and train hard,

D.

PS -- important to follow the thing about not training until the BS level is controlled. Diabetes causes tissue damage when the blood sugar precipitates out of solution, forming little crystals with sharp edges. As blood passes through capillaries, these crystals slice the vascular walls, causing them to die, leading to end-organ necrosis. Smaller capillaries in the distal parts of the body and the vaso vasorum supplying nerves are the most obvious first casualties. Working out increases microperfusion into small vessels. Causing more cutting.

When levels are down, the glucose goes back into solution, and this doesn't happen.
 
Last edited:

Live True

Brown Belt
Joined
Nov 23, 2007
Messages
486
Reaction score
47
Location
Palmyra, VA
We only talked briefly on the phone last night and he suggested that I not do strenuous exercise until we get my blood sugar levels under control - I'm not medicated at the moment, I was just diagnosed yesterday. He did not say I had to quit doing MA, thank goodness. At this point, I do not have more information than this, and I'm not going to push it or go against Dr's orders. He said no, so it is 'no' until I get to sit down with him and talk about it.

Thanks for the offer of advice, I appreciate it!

Can't argue with you there! I wasn't trying to say go against doc, especially at this stage, I think I was just trying to say ask questions and find what works for you. You've got a lot of changes ahead of you, but you've also got a great head on your shoulders Bill! Good luck!
 

Live True

Brown Belt
Joined
Nov 23, 2007
Messages
486
Reaction score
47
Location
Palmyra, VA
PS -- important to follow the thing about not training until the BS level is controlled. Diabetes causes tissue damage when the precipitates out of solution, forming little crystals with sharp edges. As blood passes through capillaries, these crystals slice the vascular walls, causing them to die, leading to end-organ necrosis. Smaller capillaries in the distal parts of the body and the vaso vasorum supplying nerves are the most obvious first casualties. Working out increases microperfusion into small vessels. Causing more cutting.

When levels are down, the glucose goes back into solution, and this doesn't happen.

Good information! Thank you!
 

stickarts

Senior Master
MT Mentor
MTS Alumni
Joined
Jul 6, 2003
Messages
3,902
Reaction score
60
Location
middletown, CT USA
I am sorry to hear this news. There are better treatments for it than ever before and you can still live a happy full life. Learn as much as you can about the disease and check your numbers every day!!!
 

Joab

2nd Black Belt
Joined
Dec 8, 2008
Messages
763
Reaction score
9
I have diabetes too, in fact type 2 like you. The good news is it is very manageable through nutrition and exercise. You shouldn't have to give up your karate training, in fact that will help keep your blood sugar level down. I'm sure your doctor will prescribe a medication, metformin is a good guess. I suggest trying splenda, it tastes just like sugar but it doesn't increase your glucose level at all. hang in there, its' not the end of the world, do what you need to do and you will be alright, I've had it for six years, nothing bad has happened to me.
 

Joab

2nd Black Belt
Joined
Dec 8, 2008
Messages
763
Reaction score
9
Don't know yet, but I suspect Type II, as the doctor told me over the phone last night that he expects we can control it with pills. But he was supposed to call me today with the results of the blood work, and he hasn't. So I do not know which type it is yet. I have lost some muscle mass, but as I was lifting weights and so on, not much. I have not passed out or become ketonic, but I have muscle cramps in my calves and feet, and my fingertips are numb, and I have blurred vision.

It has to be Type 2, you can only get Type 2 when your 40 or older. You won't have to inject insulin, although when you get older that might happen, it hasn't happened to me. Hey, I walk and push carts for 7.5 hours a day five days a week and I have Type 2 diabetes! If I can do that you can go back to training Karate in no time! Again, the training will be part of your exercise program once the diabetes is under control through medication, it shouldn't take too long.
 

seasoned

MT Senior Moderator
Staff member
Lifetime Supporting Member
Joined
Apr 19, 2007
Messages
11,254
Reaction score
1,238
Location
Lives in Texas
I just got back from my day job to find that everyone has rallied. It does my heart good to see the out pouring, to a brother in need. Although I don't know you, I feel I have known you many years, just from reading your postings. You have a lot to say in many areas, and I like what you have to say from your heart. We are all there for you, and I sincerely mean that. You are not one to hold back, so if it helps, stay open, and keep up totally involved. Hang in.
icon7.gif


Wes
 

Empty Hands

Senior Master
Joined
Feb 7, 2007
Messages
4,269
Reaction score
200
Location
Jupiter, FL
It has to be Type 2, you can only get Type 2 when your 40 or older.

I wish that was true. Due to the epidemic of overweight, overeating and lack of activity in the young, we are starting to see Type II show up in kids. It's still not common, but it does happen.
 

Latest Discussions

Top