Well, dang. Diabetes.

stickarts

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I wish that was true. Due to the epidemic of overweight, overeating and lack of activity in the young, we are starting to see Type II show up in kids. It's still not common, but it does happen.

That's true, and you can also be older and get type 1. There are no clear cut boundries.
 

Joab

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All my doctors and diabetes educators over a span of six years have told me that you can only get type 2 if your 40 years or older. That does not mean those under 40 can't get it as well, but it does mean if you are 40 or over and get it recently you have type 2. Now, you can still need to inject insulin with type 2 if you have complications, I had a client when I was a caregiver who was over 40 who needed insulin injections, but he still had type 2, with complications. Bill, you have type 2, and most likely will not need injections of insulin until you get older, and perhaps not even than.
 
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Bill Mattocks

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All my doctors and diabetes educators over a span of six years have told me that you can only get type 2 if your 40 years or older. That does not mean those under 40 can't get it as well, but it does mean if you are 40 or over and get it recently you have type 2. Now, you can still need to inject insulin with type 2 if you have complications, I had a client when I was a caregiver who was over 40 who needed insulin injections, but he still had type 2, with complications. Bill, you have type 2, and most likely will not need injections of insulin until you get older, and perhaps not even than.

Well, I don't know yet, but my doctor did tell me on our brief phone conversation that he thought I'd be able to handle it with pills, which is a bit of a relief. I'm frankly looking forward to getting started, because since I'm still untreated, I'm still having symptoms. Didn't sleep well last night, with all the getting up to urinate every 30 minutes (really disturbs a sleep cycle, believe you me). Still losing a pound or two a day, and now that I know it's diabetes and not exercise and diet doing it, I find it annoying - plus I am discovering that yes, it is eating up muscle mass as well as fat. Dang!

My wife and I are planning to take this thing head-on, with proper diet, exercise, medication, and so on. I view it as an ambush, and every good Marine knows the only way through an ambush is to assault through it. This will be the physical challenge that makes me transcend average and go for excellent physical condition. I plan to kick diabetes' butt and keep on motoring towards my MA goals.
 

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You will do fine Bill. I have found it isn't really that hard, just keep track of the sugar grams and carbohydrates on the back of the box or wrapper of the food you eat. Splenda makes a splendid sugar substitute, apples have the lowest amount of sugar of any fruit, keep active, do what your doctor tells you to do and you will be fine. I think you have more self discipline than me, and I've had no problem at all managing my diabetes, with all the good sugar substitutes available it's really not that hard. When something says sugar free be sure to check the carbohydrates, also sugar alcohols, while they do metabolize slower, added up to one half a sugar gram, divide the sugar alcohols by two and that's the amount of sugar you will be consuming according to a Nurse Practitioner I had who specialized in diabetes. You have to be sure to prepare yourself for sugar lows as well, keeping glucose tablets or hard candy around is a good idea, if your feeling normal after five minutes after consuming a candy or glucose tablet you know it was a sugar low, you will feel light headed when you have a sugar low. Be sure to go to a diabetes education class, read all you can on the subject, again you will do fine, you be back in the karate class it will be a part of your exercise schedule, it will help you manage your diabetes.
 
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Bill Mattocks

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Just FYI for ya'll...

Doctor called me back today with the results of my blood tests. Yes, I have Type II, and my fasting blood glucose level is 312 (supposed to be under 100, he says).

He put me on 500mg Metformin twice a day for thirty days, and we'll see how I do after that. He told me no karate or weight lifting until we have an idea of how this prescription will do, since he does not want me to drop into hypoglycemic range due to exercise (which he says lowers blood glucose levels). Once we have the scrip dialed in, then I can get back in the dojo full steam ahead, in fact he says exercise as much as I can.

I have a followup appointment for next week to go over details, check my glucose levels, and go over the rest of the results of my physical, including my chest x-ray which he said he sent to a radiologist due to something he saw. He says he'll talk about it with me next week. Oh great, now I can worry about that too.

Anyway, that's it for now. Just in time, too, I was started to have other symptoms.
 

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Just FYI for ya'll...

Doctor called me back today with the results of my blood tests. Yes, I have Type II, and my fasting blood glucose level is 312 (supposed to be under 100, he says).

He put me on 500mg Metformin twice a day for thirty days, and we'll see how I do after that. He told me no karate or weight lifting until we have an idea of how this prescription will do, since he does not want me to drop into hypoglycemic range due to exercise (which he says lowers blood glucose levels). Once we have the scrip dialed in, then I can get back in the dojo full steam ahead, in fact he says exercise as much as I can.

I have a followup appointment for next week to go over details, check my glucose levels, and go over the rest of the results of my physical, including my chest x-ray which he said he sent to a radiologist due to something he saw. He says he'll talk about it with me next week. Oh great, now I can worry about that too.

Anyway, that's it for now. Just in time, too, I was started to have other symptoms.

Metformin is a good one, the one I use, the same mg and twice a day. At times I've has it down to one pill a day. Of course that was only when the doctor ordered the lower amount. Check what you eat, eat as little sugar as possible and of course do what the doctor says. Remember Splenda tastes just like sugar and there are a lot of good diet sodas with splenda in them. Stay away from fruit juice and regular sodas and really stay away from alcohol. I think things will go well for you as they have for me, anything I can do for you let me know, my diabetes brother. A lot of people helped me out when I got diagnosed, I want to give back. My prayers are with you. Check out the American Diabetes Association website.
 

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I'm on metformin as well Bill, and it works very well. Just so you know, it can have some interesting side affects. Let's just say you may want to know where all bathrooms are whenever you go anywhere as you get used to the medication. If you are susceptible to this side effect, it will regulate itself over time. 'nuff said. :uhyeah:

Just a suggestion, FWIW: Once you start exercising, closely watch your blood sugar before and after working out, so you get a good feel for how exercising affects you. Each person will have her/his own reactions. For me, I need to eat a small carb snack before, work out as hard as I want, then a good protein snack or balanced meal afterwards. As I said before, my blood sugar spikes immediately after workouts, but is much lower within 15-30 minutes of workout, and will remain low for a quite a while.

I think the ADA website is a good starting point and reference. It's great for getting the basic signs of high and low blood sugar and general reference tool (lots of good info), but I wouldn't recommend that be your only resource. Alot of the literature, particularly the older literature, focuses on the scary and worst case scenario (you could lose a foot, go blind, etc.). These are all true, but diabetes, particularly today, is a very livable disease. I think some of the literature out there is meant to be a shock factor as so many people get diagnosed and do nothing to change thier lifestyles. Today, diabetes is very treatable, and (in many cases of type II, particularly if weight is part of the cause) you can reverse the affects with significant focus and exercise.

Based on the impression I've got from you on the forums, you don't suffer fools gladly, and you are determined once you've set a goal. So, you don't need to have the shock treatment for information, and you don't need to be babied along the way. What you need is a good resource of information. You might want to talk to your doctor about meeting with a nutritionist, just for a baseline of information. Then read up and go at it! I'm pulling for ya to be back to the dojo soon and attacking this beast!

Oh, and make sure your wife and dojo mates know the signs of high/low blood sugar as well. If it's a sudden drop or rise, you may not be aware that you are acting loopy or sluggish. It doesn't happen often, but it can happen suddenly, and as I'm sure you know...it's always good to have someone have your back.
 
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Bill Mattocks

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FYI - some people recommend cinnamon pills for diabetes. Well, OK. They are just cinnamon in a capsule, regular cinnamon. You swallow the pill and it opens in your stomach and believe me, you know it when that happens.

And they cause gas.

And my coworkers keep walking around asking each other who brought donuts.

Yikes.
 

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FYI - some people recommend cinnamon pills for diabetes. Well, OK. They are just cinnamon in a capsule, regular cinnamon. You swallow the pill and it opens in your stomach and believe me, you know it when that happens.

And they cause gas.

And my coworkers keep walking around asking each other who brought donuts.

Yikes.
I have read that cinnamon can have an positive affect on blood sugars, but I'm not sure if they had determined the dosage or method...this sounds to me like someone half reading real medical literature and deciding they have a marketing opportunity....yoikes..gag....

Me, I'll stick with my homemade zuchinni, carrot muffins with cinnamon, sweetened with applesauce and turbinado (and limit how much I eat, of course).
 
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Bill Mattocks

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I have read that cinnamon can have an positive affect on blood sugars, but I'm not sure if they had determined the dosage or method...this sounds to me like someone half reading real medical literature and deciding they have a marketing opportunity....yoikes..gag....

Me, I'll stick with my homemade zuchinni, carrot muffins with cinnamon, sweetened with applesauce and turbinado (and limit how much I eat, of course).

Well, it comes from the USDA Nutrient Requirements and Functions Laboratory:

http://www.ars.usda.gov/Research/docs.htm?docid=8877
 

Carol

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Live True

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Well, it comes from the USDA Nutrient Requirements and Functions Laboratory:

http://www.ars.usda.gov/Research/docs.htm?docid=8877

Be careful with self-medicating.

The reason why cinnamon has the effects it does is because cinnamon contains coumarin, which is a known blood thinner.

Just because something is natural doesn't mean its safe, nor does it mean its the best choice for your condition.

More info...
http://www.bfr.bund.de/cm/245/high_daily_intakes_of_cinnamon_health_risk_cannot_be_ruled_out.pdf

Thanks both for the links, good reading!
Carol,
I knew about the different types of cinnamon and the substance coumarin, but hadn't read up on it's side affects, thank you!

Bill,
I was not scoffing at you, but at the pill. I think any supplement should be considered and consumed with caution. Carol's right, natural doesn't mean safe (and I'm a BIG natural cure proponent, oddly enough). When I referenced the muffins, I was talking about natural usage, as suggested in the article you referenced. From the articles I had read, it recommended increasing the natural amount of cinnamon you used in your normal routines. I think this is a pleasant and safe way to get some benefits, make your food richer in flavour (so you will hopefully eat less), and just enjoy life while living with this disease.

I am NOT a proponent of living your life counting every calorie, sugar gram, etc. I DO think it's important as you first get things under control, and for an occasional reality check, but I strongly believe you make lifestyle changes you can live with. So, for me, I find ways to make the foods I eat more enjoyable, and the exercise I do something I enjoy and yet still challenges me. SO....put some cinnamon in your oatmeal or muffins, but step away from the cinnamon tablets.

And...many things like this may have gaseous side affects at first..so does high fiber...but your body can adjust if it's actually a good thing.
 

Carol

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I don't think cinnamon has to be avoided altogether, but cinnamon is supposed to be a spice, not a major ingredient in foodstuffs. I had to read the riot act to my mom because she read something somewhere that said cinnamon can help lower cholesterol in women so she started going crazy and pouring it over her oatmeal and tea. That was enough to create a bad interaction with a couple other meds (for unrelated issues) she is taking over the winter, and she's still trying to get her system back in to balance five months later.

The sad thing is, that didn't have to happen. My mom weighs maybe 120 pounds, she walks 1.5 miles a day, and eats healthy. Her cholesterol was not badly out of line either.
 

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A couple months ago, I decided to add a health club membership to my MA training, so I joined a weightlifting gym and started working out on the nights I was not at the dojo.

Almost immediately, I began losing weight at a prodigious rate. In fact, it seemed to be coming off too fast and too easily. I also developed an unquenchable thirst for water, and likewise, the urge to urinate frequently (logical).

Then I started waking up with cramps in my calves and feet in the middle of the nights, and finally I developed ringing in my ears and my fingertips became numb.

I just had a doctor's appointment this morning, and the doctor called me up this evening to inform me that my tests came back positive for diabetes. He warned me not to go to the dojo (I was on my way out the door) and not to engage in any strenuous physical exercise until we have my blood sugar under control.

I'm a little bummed out.

Sorry, just needed to share.


Bill,

I wish you the best with your testing and your doctor. If the Sugar levels get under control than working out should be possible, but always listen to your docotro and not random people on the web like me.

I am sorry to hear this, and I hope you can keep positive spirits while you get your chemistry under control.

Best wishes
 

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Of course listen to your Doctor as Rich Parsons suggested, but I am confident you will be back in training in a month. I really am, I walk 7.5 hours a day pushing carts and have type 2 diabetes, everyone I know that has type 2 lives an active life, I really believe you will be back in the dojo in a short while. In the meantime, you can still practice visualization, it's important, and do some reading on your said art, perhaps practice slow hand motions while sitting, you will be alright as long as you do what you need to do, and I believe you will.
 
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Bill Mattocks

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Of course listen to your Doctor as Rich Parsons suggested, but I am confident you will be back in training in a month. I really am, I walk 7.5 hours a day pushing carts and have type 2 diabetes, everyone I know that has type 2 lives an active life, I really believe you will be back in the dojo in a short while. In the meantime, you can still practice visualization, it's important, and do some reading on your said art, perhaps practice slow hand motions while sitting, you will be alright as long as you do what you need to do, and I believe you will.

Thank you, I am going to the dojo tonight. On Wednesdays, one of our senior BB's (and I mean senior, he's 71) opens the dojo for himself and whomever wants to drop in, not a formal class like Mondays and Thursday and Saturdays. I have discussed this with my sensei - I am just going to suit up and walk through my kata (working on Seisan) in slow motion, without breaking a sweat or getting my heartrate up. Just nice and slow. I want to keep what I have, and I even thought that some slow-motion kata might help me get my feet right and catch little things I might be doing wrong. Nice and slow, but I really want to keep going so I stay in the habit of going. I may drop by on training nights and sit and observe, you can learn a lot that way too.
 

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Thank you, I am going to the dojo tonight. On Wednesdays, one of our senior BB's (and I mean senior, he's 71) opens the dojo for himself and whomever wants to drop in, not a formal class like Mondays and Thursday and Saturdays. I have discussed this with my sensei - I am just going to suit up and walk through my kata (working on Seisan) in slow motion, without breaking a sweat or getting my heartrate up. Just nice and slow. I want to keep what I have, and I even thought that some slow-motion kata might help me get my feet right and catch little things I might be doing wrong. Nice and slow, but I really want to keep going so I stay in the habit of going. I may drop by on training nights and sit and observe, you can learn a lot that way too.

Excellent ideas, I'm sure you will get a lot out of it.
 
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Bill Mattocks

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Excellent ideas, I'm sure you will get a lot out of it.

I did last night, thanks. I took my time doing extended stretching exercises, no calisthenics, just stretching.

Then I practiced my Seisan kata, which believe me needs much practice. Going very slow, I had the chance to watch my feet, and it was clear I still have problems with my stance - too deep when I step forward with my right foot, and I still have a tendency to go splay-footed if I'm not paying attention. But it was good. Sensei was terrific.

Plus, I found out that Master Mitchum is going to be visiting this coming weekend and I may get a chance to meet him finally. One of the true stars in the Isshinryu sky.

So all good.
 

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Great! Glad things are going well for you Bill!
 
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