Tensho Kata.

arnisador

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What do people think about Tensho? It's a very simple pattern and the techniques seem to be isolated for practice rather than being a sequence meant to be done in self-defense--you wouldn't likely stand stock-still and do a double upward wrist block, followed by a double downward palm block, as a self-defense measure, after all. Nonetheless I always liked it and the "feel" I got from it. I was told it was "old man's Sanchin" but I liked it when I learned it at 21 years old! It screamed kung fu to me.
 
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DKI Girl

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I was taught a version of this also and I think they might have used it for some type of qi qong......I know that I always feel my energy moving and feel good after doing Tensho.

dki girl
 

D.Cobb

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The version I know is very "Tai Chi-ish" in nature. Done slowly with a lot of attention to breathing. I will quite often do an extra rep of this kata after an intense class, or a grading, just to calm down a little more.
--Dave
 
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arnisador

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Yes, I know just what you mean. It's slow and focused on breathing as I learned it too. I no longer practice karate so I no longer do it but i always liked it.
 
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GojuBujin

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Oss,

I've also heard that Tensho is an older man's Sanchin. Tensho is said to take off where Sanchin leaves off. Sanchin is supposed to represent the hard side of Goju, the Go. Tensho represents the Ju, the soft part of Goju. Look closely Tensho contains Kakie (sticky hands) techniques.

Michael C. Byrd
www.inigmasoft.com/goyukai
 
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Battousai

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Tensho is my favorite kata:)
I've been taught to do it with extreme tension, resistence sort of thing. For real life, I think that the bunkai within it is quite applicable. Tensho lore states that it comes from white crane boxing, if not directly copied from a white crane boxing school then at least highly influenced by that art.
 
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arnisador

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I certainly believe the crane connection.

I was taught to do it with relatively little tension.
 

Martin h

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I love tensho, it is both beautiful and enjoyable to do.
Mas Oyama (founder of kyokushinkai), used to say that it was one of the most important katas to learn for self defense.
By selfdefense, Oyama usualy refered to escapes from wristholds and such "Jujutsu"like techniques.
 
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arnisador

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You mean he distinguished self-defense (fom holds) from fighting (with punches)?
 
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RyuShiKan

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Originally posted by Martin h

I love tensho, it is both beautiful and enjoyable to do.
Mas Oyama (founder of kyokushinkai), used to say that it was one of the most important katas to learn for self defense.
By selfdefense, Oyama usualy refered to escapes from wristholds and such "Jujutsu"like techniques.



On one of the several times I met and spoke with Oyama he described "self-defense" techniques as being for "women".........giving the impression that "real" men didn't need such stuff.

I found that rather odd..........
 

Martin h

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Originally posted by RyuShiKan

On one of the several times I met and spoke with Oyama he described "self-defense" techniques as being for "women".........giving the impression that "real" men didn't need such stuff.

I found that rather odd..........

Not entirely.
The techniques that Oyama termed "self defense" mostly include one and twohanded grabs, sleeve grabs and so on.
These are attacks that usualy are not the initial attacks male vs male, but are common whith overenthusiastic male bastards approaching a woman.

Now, a real MAN ':D:', naturaly solves the problem by using strenght and a good punch, but a lady must first get free from a larger, stronger person.

As a sideline, I could mention that the same techniques from oyamas "selfdefense", is found in a style of jujutsu I once practiced. But that they are concidered unrealistic since noone ever ':rolleyes:' would be stupid enough to attack by grabbing across to your hand, setting him up for a kotegaeshi.
As stated above, I do not agree.

BTW, Im jealous. I never had the privilege to meet Oyama.
 

Haze

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What do people think about Tensho? It's a very simple pattern and the techniques seem to be isolated for practice rather than being a sequence meant to be done in self-defense--you wouldn't likely stand stock-still and do a double upward wrist block, followed by a double downward palm block, as a self-defense measure, after all.

Lets take the pattern out of context,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,against 2 hand lapel grab or 2 hand front choke,,,,,,,,,,,,double downward palm block could be strikes to the attackers arms causing him to lean in/forward,,,,,,,,,,,,double upward wrist blocks could be strikes to the jaw,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,downward blocks again with fingers grabbing behind clavicle forcing attacker down for ,,,,,,,,, muay thai type clinch and knee to ribs or face.

Everything has a purpose if you look for it.
 

harlan

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Hmm...when we do it 'hard', or with kung li, it's not so restful.

First upper block could be eye scrapes as well, and the return inner strike to throat, second lower set abdomen strikes.
 

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What do people think about Tensho? It's a very simple pattern and the techniques seem to be isolated for practice rather than being a sequence meant to be done in self-defense--you wouldn't likely stand stock-still and do a double upward wrist block, followed by a double downward palm block, as a self-defense measure, after all. Nonetheless I always liked it and the "feel" I got from it. I was told it was "old man's Sanchin" but I liked it when I learned it at 21 years old! It screamed kung fu to me.

Tensho makes the wonderful art of Okinawan GoJu complete. Its counter part Sanchin is taught in the beginning stages of GoJu as the foundational kata. I know this thread is very old, but I thought I would address this post out of respect for Sensei Vince Grace, of whom I think you learned this kata. A few years back when I mentioned the passing of Sensei Grace, may he rest in Pease, you mentioned training with him. Sensei Grace and I were good friends for many years and I will surely miss him. Tensho kata is indeed the sticky hands kata of GoJu teaching arm sensitivity, along with traps, and arm and wrist locks. If practiced diligently it will begin to tie in all the GoJu kata, and take it from a punch, kick, block to a close in fighting system. Where Sanchin teaches us how to put power into our techniques, Tensho teaches us how to harness that power, therefore making the moves and techniques of GoJu flow. Without Tensho, to give us the Ju part, or soft part of the art it would not be the unique art it is. :asian:
 
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arnisador

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Yes, it was indeed from Vinson Grace that I learned this kata at the Euclid Community Open House building near S.U.! What a great instructor. Thanks for all the responses.
 

Uchinanchu

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In Meibukan (as well as probably a few other kaiha) saifa is referred to as the 'finishing kata' and is normally done at the very end of formal training/class, before students rei out. One reason for this kata being done after everything else (kihon, kata, kakie, kottekitai etc...) is because of the very nature of it. It does have a calming/relaxing effect due to the type of breathing maintained during its execution.

As for application, I personally love what sensei has shown us, and can see how it can be tied directly into all other aspects of our training, especially the kottekitai drills (a personal favorite of mine)!
 

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