Steep fees!

terryl965

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Money Money Money, what is the problem with money. most people go to work to earn a living. Most instructors need to earn a living also they need to pay the Dojaang rent utilities and insurance for the people.If you are happy with your training than money does not matter if not look else where but remember you get what you pay for, buyer beware of false promises.
 

Cruentus

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There is nothing wrong with charging a reasonable fee for instruction.

If a college brings in a guest lecturer, they pay him sometimes between 10 and 20 grand for an afternoon.

We get punched at, kicked at, hit in the nuts, eyes, throat, etc. We get our bodies torques around if we're working like we should, and we get challenged often on top of it, and we always have to remain on top of our game.

Yet, people will want to whine about 10 bucks an hour? I think many people need to get their priorities straight.

If the martial arts school brings you value, then there is nothing wrong with paying them a fair and reasonable price for there services. period.

Paul
 

dearnis.com

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Kendo is, quite simply, expensive and there seems to be no way to cut the cost. As far as that art goes, the shinai is the tip of the iceberg; look at the cost for decent complete kit. Then ask yourself how much training that amount of money will bring you in one of the other arts. If your choice is between training and gear....choose training!
 

bignick

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CountPike said:
...but really, being relegated from the main body of the class for 6 months and watching them enjoy themselves? Psychological Trorture.
Of course....they only want people that are dedicated to stick around. I've heard of kendo schools where you do almost nothing but learn footwork for the entire first year. I've also heard of schools that schedule their classes on nights where people normally wouldn't want to come to the dojo...i.e..Friday/Saturday night...
 

Shogun

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I've always paid about $50 -$80 month, and $10 drop in fee isnt bad. Say I can only go once a week, than its $40 dollars a month. other classes, are more. so many factors......
 

still learning

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Hello, 2 cents for this thought? If they are consider one of the best schools to learn from "expect higher fees" . The best will train with only the best. If it is a average school and you find the fees to high for you?....look around for something in your price range. This is a hard question to answer regarding the fees because we do not know all the details. In a big city , the cost may be higher than a rural town. Every instructor can and will set what they want to charge you for their time to teach you what they learn. The teachers background / his experience may be worth the cost/fees for the class.

Want to learn from "Chuck Norris, Joe Lewis, Superfoot, etc ..won't be cheap?
Want to learn from me " inexpensive" but you get what you pay for? ...Aloha
 

still learning

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Hello, For 2 cents here are my thoughts. The best will learn only from the best, if that school is consider one of the best to learn from than expect higher fees. If it is just a aveage school and you find the fees to high for you,look else where.
Each teacher will set the rates for their experience/ background of knowledge that they will share with you. Is it worth the cost? You must decide that for your self, everyone is different in what they want out of the class.

Usually in the big cities the cost of training is higher (cost of rent,so on), in the rural towns cost is usually cheaper.

Chuck Norris,Joe Lewis, Superfoot, etc..to learn from them expect high fees.
From me expect "cheaper fee" ....Class will be at? .......Aloha
 

asangria

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I pay 15 dollars for private lessons and I didn't think that was too expensive. I checked other places and it seemed they wanted to charge more but offered less.

At least where I train doesn't try to lock me down into a contract.
 

Adept

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Paul B said:
I would say it depends on the Instructor. Does he/she do this for a living? If they do,then suddenly 11 bucks an hour doesn't seem like much to make.
No, but remember it is $11.00 per student per hour. Ten students makes this $110.00 an hour. twenty students makes it $220.00

Thats a lot.

I pay $25 a month for training five nights a week, and the first sunday of every month. The price is a flat rate, and you train as often as you want.
 

BrandiJo

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I pay 25 a month for 4 times a week sometimes the class is an hr sometimes 2, my Inst are well qualified but they dont do this for a liviing they charge enough to keep the lights on and the rent payed
 

MJS

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Keep in mind that there are alot of things to take into consideration when talking about prices.

1- Supply and demand. This can also be translated into the art that is in question.

2- Number of times classes are offered at said school.

3- Who is the inst. that is offering the classes?

Many inst. out there have spent years and alot of money invested into their own learning, so they kind of look at it like the student, if they are truly hungry for what is being taught, will also spend much money.

Take into consideration the location of the school. If its in a prime location, the rent can be very high. The inst. I'm sure will want to make some sort of profit, even if it is not his/her sole source for money.

Who is the teacher that is teaching? Now, my BJJ inst. is a student under Roy Harris. I don't know for a fact how much Roy charges for lessons at his location, but I can also bet that its a heck of alot more than what my inst. is charging. But, thats one way to look at it...are you learning from a student or from the man himself??

As for the privates...again, depends on the person doing them. I've seen anywhere from $20-50, and as high as $100-120.

Mike
 

Rob Broad

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Adept said:
No, but remember it is $11.00 per student per hour. Ten students makes this $110.00 an hour. twenty students makes it $220.00

Thats a lot.

I pay $25 a month for training five nights a week, and the first sunday of every month. The price is a flat rate, and you train as often as you want.


Something that has to be considered is the amount of money that comes in when the school is not open. That is Zero dollars during those hours. Most instructor take all their expenses at them all together, then divide it my average hours in a month that they have class, from there they fiure out how many students they ususally have per class and then work out a reasonable fee, plus they have to add a little in there for themselves, since they are giving up their time that they could be doing something else with such as spending it with family, working, or anything else.

For example.
The school has a total of $1200 a month in expenses such as rent insurance and utilities. But the school is only open 20 hours per week which is 80 hours per month which means there is a lot of hours in which the school is not generating cash. $1200 divided by 80 is 15/hour that the school has to generate which doesn't seem like much, when you have 10 peopel per class coming in but there is usually taxes that have to be paid on every dollar coming in the door on top of your monthly expenses. There are of lots things trying to take the money from the instructor, and $1200 would be an extrememly low operating cost.

Also, does the instructor go to seminars and training camps to gain more knowledge, if so should the school not pay for this instead of it coming out of his own pocket.

There are many things that have to be taken into consideration when a school owner sets his monthly tuitions, rent, utilities, taxes, insurance association fees, advertising, common usage fees are just a few of them.
 
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CountPike

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bignick said:
Of course....they only want people that are dedicated to stick around. I've heard of kendo schools where you do almost nothing but learn footwork for the entire first year. I've also heard of schools that schedule their classes on nights where people normally wouldn't want to come to the dojo...i.e..Friday/Saturday night...


Not meaning to be shallow but if I went to a school like that and heard id spend a year learning how to step backwards and forwards I would quit strait away. A Year of paying so much every lesson and so on, buying armour and shinai and all and all you can do is step forwards and backwards. Shows a great cost effective scheme there. :uhyeah:
I accept there are costs but if any of you come from britain you will understand
 

Paul B

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I agree,Adept. That is a bit of money,I was under the impression he was spending that on "privates",though. I would be paying something like like $250US per month,then....
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