Someday ill start TKD..

Kframe

Black Belt
Joined
May 9, 2011
Messages
651
Reaction score
12
Location
NE Indiana
Someday ill start tkd, not right now the time just isnt right. Im not phyically able to do many of the high flying kicks and such, i have to loose more weight and gain more fitness. So knowing that, istarted learning boxing and am on my 3rd week of it. Its a great martial art, and it gives me a great excersize session 3 times aweek. I have already lost weight since i have started.
I know that not all of what im learning in boxing will transfere over to TKD, but do you experianced TKD teachers and practitioners know what will? Besides the fitness and conditioning im getting will this help me or hinder me when its finaly time to start tkd. I am enjoying boxing and am not going to leave it untill i have made certain fitness and boxing goals for my self.

Secondly what can you guys tell me about the typical tkd training session at a dojo? At my boxing gym once started its a work out from the word GO! Everything we do reinforces the techniques and also helps in some aspect of the conditioning. Basicly will i get a nice calorie burning work out or does it kinda drop off after warm ups? I ask becuase i did a few months of Karate and after the warm ups it slowed way down and was no longer a work out at all. I ended up quiting becuase if felt i was getting nowhere both fitness wise and martial arts wise.

Thirdly, how do i choose a school? I found one school were the teacher has a 4th blackbelt tkd, a 3rd black belt in kempo and a bluebelt in jui jitsu. This school was recommended to me by a mma coach who said that if i didnt train at his school and wanted a tma i should go here. Problem is, this place wants $95 amonth for dues.. Should i keep looking?

Fourth, how does the learning of kata(or what ever the tkd version is called) work? How much time is spent in class just working on the forms? How much is dedicated to the application of what is taught in the forms. I have a feeling its the application that is the most important part of the learning, as you are doing it against a person and not air. When i was in the karate place, i was there for 3 months and hadnt even been shown my first form. I watched each class as the higher ups did theres, but was never shown. What was odd, was the higher ups doing there kata never did any application drills of those katas either.

I hope this helps everyone here to understand where im coming from and what i am looking for. Aswell as the reasoning im not in tkd right now, but doing boxing till my fitness is were i want it to be and im ready to start it.
 

Earl Weiss

Senior Master
Joined
Jan 27, 2009
Messages
3,281
Reaction score
660
I know that not all of what im learning in boxing will transfere over to TKD, but do you experianced TKD teachers and practitioners know what will? .

Secondly what can you guys tell me about the typical tkd training session at a dojo? At my boxing gym once started its a work out from the word GO! Everything we do reinforces the techniques and also helps in some aspect of the conditioning.

Thirdly, how do i choose a school?

Fourth, how does the learning of kata(or what ever the tkd version is called) work?

I hope this helps everyone here to understand where im coming from and what i am looking for. Aswell as the reasoning im not in tkd right now, but doing boxing till my fitness is were i want it to be and im ready to start it.

What will transfer from Boxing to TKD depenmds a lot on the tyoe of TKD you sign up for. If the system does not allow punches to the head when sparring, not so much. If it does allow this then plenty will transfer.

There is no "Typical TKD training" Schools will vary greatly . Watch severral classes to get good feel for what they do. AFAIAC I have too much to teach and limited class time too precious to spend on conditioning. I tell people they need to do this on their own. You need to run, swim, or bike for a minimum of 20 minutes 3x a week. Strnegth training and flexibility work outside of class is reccomended as well.
 

granfire

Sr. Grandmaster
Joined
Dec 8, 2007
Messages
15,714
Reaction score
1,387
Location
In Pain
a decent instructor will start you of slowly. You won't get to do the flying kicks for a while. After all, you have to learn how to walk before you can fly! ;)

Whether or not 95 dollars a month is a lot or not depends on many things. The quality of instruction and the facilities, as well as the staff.

I used to work out at a school that offered classes 6 days a week, plus a coupe of morning classes for adults. The instructor was top notch and very dedicated.

On the other hand, I have seen the results of a school in the same organization, I was less impressed with what they turned out.

Also, the monthly fee might include such things as rank test fees and belts. many times such things cost extra.


As to learning the forms, they are a collection of the techniques you learn in class.
The first set or two will be very difficult, since it is a very different way of doing things than what we are used to (I watched my kid for almost 2 month doing the first one before I started, and still I messed up a lot and thought I was comprised of all left limbs that did not belong together.
Generally you will have an instructor demonstrate it to you and then correct you as you do it yourself. No biggy.

As to general fitness, it depends on the school. We trained for an hour. That does not sound like much, but if structured right, you can leave everything on the mat.
With no extra activities, my fitness level increased dramatically over time, as well as flexibility and strength, all by going 3 times a week.

It won't hurt to shop around some more, that's for sure.
See if they let you do a trial class or two. That should give you a feel for the school and instructors if they are a good fit for you.
 
OP
K

Kframe

Black Belt
Joined
May 9, 2011
Messages
651
Reaction score
12
Location
NE Indiana
Thanks for the replies! Earl, about allowing punching to the head, im going to have a hard time finding a school here that allows it. They are all WTF/KKW affiliated which means there sparring does not allow punches to the head. I dont know if this will be a big problem becuase my boxing gym has practice on saturdays so ill get to punch as much head as i want to then as well. Of There is also alot of ATA schools here , but i have researched enough to know to avoid them. Early what kind of conditioning do you reccomend? I dont think i can afford a gym membership right now, is there anything i can do for my conditioning out side of class using just me? Secondly, black belt mag has a conditioning dvd for strikers, http://www.blackbeltmag.com/shop/ultimate-conditioning-volume-1-strikers-dvd/

Granfire, thanks for the insight. I know what a hour can do. My boxing gym is only 1.5 hours and we whomp ****. I realise that it will be slow going when i do start, im not worried about that. From what i am gathering tho, if i do start tkd, im going to have to spend time out side of class doing my own conditioning.

How much time is usually spent on the application of the forms tho? Like i remember from my time in karate, i watched the blackbelts and they never did any application, i went 3 times aweek and never once saw them go through each step of there kata and practice whats going on.
 

Earl Weiss

Senior Master
Joined
Jan 27, 2009
Messages
3,281
Reaction score
660
Thanks for the replies! Earl, about allowing punching to the head, im going to have a hard time finding a school here that allows it. They are all WTF/KKW affiliated
.

Aside from "retail schools" check out classes at Park Districts, YMCA's and community centers. You may find something else.
 

Earl Weiss

Senior Master
Joined
Jan 27, 2009
Messages
3,281
Reaction score
660
what kind of conditioning do you reccomend? I dont think i can afford a gym membership right now, is there anything i can do for my conditioning out side of class using just me? .

You don't need a gym memebership for conditioning. A good pair of running shoes will do. The boxing gym probably has Jump ropes and stationary bikes. Body weight strengthening exercises can accomplish a lot.
 

granfire

Sr. Grandmaster
Joined
Dec 8, 2007
Messages
15,714
Reaction score
1,387
Location
In Pain
Granfire, thanks for the insight. I know what a hour can do. My boxing gym is only 1.5 hours and we whomp ****. I realise that it will be slow going when i do start, im not worried about that. From what i am gathering tho, if i do start tkd, im going to have to spend time out side of class doing my own conditioning.

How much time is usually spent on the application of the forms tho? Like i remember from my time in karate, i watched the blackbelts and they never did any application, i went 3 times aweek and never once saw them go through each step of there kata and practice whats going on.



Well, we did train for strikes to the head, but during tournament rule sparring they were not allowed (and I never landed prettier punches either)

As to conditioning outside of the dojang, it depends. As I said, I did not and improved. Other schools might have other requirements. But conditioning can be had at home, as mentioned the jump rope, weights can usually be had for cheap at a thrift store, especially once the New Years resolutions have worn off...a couple of cans from the grocery store can work just fine as well, or your MP3 player with your favorite dance grooves.

Application of forms. Well, honestly, I don't think a lot of people know or care the meaning and intent of a move in a form. Much of it comes much later as the serious students continue. Over all, a form is a way to practice elements you could normally not do with a partner, Like the eye gouge in Choong Moo (red belt rank or there's about)...training partners usually frown upon those type of things. ;)
You can naturally put as much effort into form as you wish. I know of one guy who would work himself into a lather doing nothing but forms....

Around here, the Y offers class, or a couple of independent schools that work out of civic centers. From what I gather, one can do better than ATA, but - depending on instructor - one can do a lot worse , too (run from anything 'Tiger Rock' though)
 

Cyriacus

Senior Master
Joined
Jun 25, 2011
Messages
3,827
Reaction score
47
Location
Australia
Fun time!

Someday ill start tkd, not right now the time just isnt right. Im not phyically able to do many of the high flying kicks and such,

TKD is not made of flying kicks. And of course you cant do it, You havent been taught anything.

i have to loose more weight and gain more fitness.

Most of the folks who join up at Dojangs are unfit.

So knowing that, istarted learning boxing and am on my 3rd week of it. Its a great martial art, and it gives me a great excersize session 3 times aweek. I have already lost weight since i have started.

Boxing is great for weight loss.

I know that not all of what im learning in boxing will transfere over to TKD, but do you experianced TKD teachers and practitioners know what will?
Alot can be transferred, but its pointless. Uppercut = Upset Punch. Hook Punch = Roundhouse Punch. Cross/Rear Straight = Reverse Punch. Jab = Forward Punch. Shovel Hook = ...Shovel Hook. And so on. Theres no purpose in translating anything, when there are already equivalents.

Besides the fitness and conditioning im getting will this help me or hinder me when its finaly time to start tkd. I am enjoying boxing and am not going to leave it untill i have made certain fitness and boxing goals for my self.

It will do neither. It wont make You a better TKD Practitioner, and it wont make You a worse one. Youd be getting Fitness and Conditioning at a decent Dojang as well.

Secondly what can you guys tell me about the typical tkd training session at a dojo?

No such thing. Even Boxing Gyms are pretty unique.

At my boxing gym once started its a work out from the word GO! Everything we do reinforces the techniques and also helps in some aspect of the conditioning. Basicly will i get a nice calorie burning work out or does it kinda drop off after warm ups? I ask becuase i did a few months of Karate and after the warm ups it slowed way down and was no longer a work out at all.

A Shame. It was probably not the best Karate Outlet in existence then.

I ended up quiting becuase if felt i was getting nowhere both fitness wise and martial arts wise.

Good.

Thirdly, how do i choose a school? I found one school were the teacher has a 4th blackbelt tkd, a 3rd black belt in kempo and a bluebelt in jui jitsu. This school was recommended to me by a mma coach who said that if i didnt train at his school and wanted a tma i should go here. Problem is, this place wants $95 amonth for dues.. Should i keep looking?

Believe it or not, thats a reasonable fee. Look at the quality, not the price. If you look for the cheapest Outlet You can find, itll be Cheap for a reason.

Fourth, how does the learning of kata(or what ever the tkd version is called) work? How much time is spent in class just working on the forms? How much is dedicated to the application of what is taught in the forms. I have a feeling its the application that is the most important part of the learning, as you are doing it against a person and not air. When i was in the karate place, i was there for 3 months and hadnt even been shown my first form. I watched each class as the higher ups did theres, but was never shown. What was odd, was the higher ups doing there kata never did any application drills of those katas either.

Every Dojang does this differently. Some Dojangs barely teach Forms.

I hope this helps everyone here to understand where im coming from and what i am looking for. Aswell as the reasoning im not in tkd right now, but doing boxing till my fitness is were i want it to be and im ready to start it.

I used to be overweight, unfit, had RSI CPS in My Right Wrist, and an Ankle Injury. It didnt stop Me, and all of those things were completely fixed within two Months.

Just My Contribution.
 

ralphmcpherson

Senior Master
Joined
Sep 6, 2009
Messages
2,200
Reaction score
48
Location
australia
Choose your tkd school carefully and try not to buy into the many tkd stereotypes. Remember, what you see on youtube under "tkd" is a highlights package, just like any other sport that has highlights on youtube. Watch a highlights vid of rugby league then watch a game of rugby league and it would be unrecognisable. It would be a pretty boring youtube video if they showed a typical tkd class, so the vids filled with all sorts of things you will probably never see or do in a real dojang. Ive had a heap of people say to me over the years that they'd love to do tkd but were worried about "all the flying kicks". I always invite them along to watch/participate in one of our classes and they are usually blown away by the end of it, mainly at how different it is to what they expected. You would have to sit through a lot of our classes to see 'flying kicks', we do them very occasionally but more for a bit of fun or something a bit different. If only super fit, flexible people could do tkd then it wouldnt be the most practiced art on earth, I mean realistically, how many people out there in the general population are super fit and flexible. If anything, tkd will aid you in overcoming such things. Prior to starting tkd I had a lot of back problems (as a lot of tall people do), within 6 months of tkd all back problems ceased and Ive never felt better, and 6 years on I havent felt this good physically in my life.
 

Gnarlie

Master of Arts
Joined
Dec 13, 2011
Messages
1,913
Reaction score
445
Location
Germany
Someday ill start tkd, not right now the time just isnt right. Im not phyically able to do many of the high flying kicks and such, i have to loose more weight and gain more fitness. So knowing that, istarted learning boxing and am on my 3rd week of it. Its a great martial art, and it gives me a great excersize session 3 times aweek. I have already lost weight since i have started.
I know that not all of what im learning in boxing will transfere over to TKD, but do you experianced TKD teachers and practitioners know what will? Besides the fitness and conditioning im getting will this help me or hinder me when its finaly time to start tkd. I am enjoying boxing and am not going to leave it untill i have made certain fitness and boxing goals for my self.

The principles of twisting waist and shoulder to punch, covering with the free arm, generating power with the legs, positioning relative to the opponent, bilateral co-ordination, proprioception, focus and experience of contact will all be invaluable for TKD purposes. One of my students used to box competitively, and his experience has given him a massive headstart over many other people.

Secondly what can you guys tell me about the typical tkd training session at a dojo? At my boxing gym once started its a work out from the word GO! Everything we do reinforces the techniques and also helps in some aspect of the conditioning. Basicly will i get a nice calorie burning work out or does it kinda drop off after warm ups? I ask becuase i did a few months of Karate and after the warm ups it slowed way down and was no longer a work out at all. I ended up quiting becuase if felt i was getting nowhere both fitness wise and martial arts wise.

School dependent. I've been in clubs at both extremes. Choose carefully, I'd suggest watching some TKD sessions a few weeks apart to get a good view of what the typical content is, while you're boxing.

Thirdly, how do i choose a school? I found one school were the teacher has a 4th blackbelt tkd, a 3rd black belt in kempo and a bluebelt in jui jitsu. This school was recommended to me by a mma coach who said that if i didnt train at his school and wanted a tma i should go here. Problem is, this place wants $95 amonth for dues.. Should i keep looking?

I pay Euro 55 per month with the opportunity to train 5 full afternoons and evenings per week in a very well equipped Dojang with showers, saunas, matting etc. Choose carefully, the standard of instruction in TKD can vary wildly, even within the same organisation or club. I would go talk to the guy, take a couple of trial sessions and see how he reacts to questions, challenges etc. Also what proportion of the training time is talk - it should be minimal, with the focus on training. Talk can come after class. If you find the right instructor, it's worth any amount of money, but don't pay anything to anyone until you know that they are the one for you.

Fourth, how does the learning of kata(or what ever the tkd version is called) work? How much time is spent in class just working on the forms? How much is dedicated to the application of what is taught in the forms. I have a feeling its the application that is the most important part of the learning, as you are doing it against a person and not air. When i was in the karate place, i was there for 3 months and hadnt even been shown my first form. I watched each class as the higher ups did theres, but was never shown. What was odd, was the higher ups doing there kata never did any application drills of those katas either.

Again, depends on the club. In my experience of Kukki / WTF TKD, normally poomsae are relegated to a 5 - 20 minute slot at the end of the class, with the rest of the focus mostly on sparring / padwork drills. However, there are clubs that focus much more time and effort on poomsae.

Information on applications of the patterns is sparse and often speculative. Applications hinted at from offical sources e.g. Kukkiwon are often dubious and sometimes ludicrous. But there is a new wave of instructors in both Karate and Taekwondo who are keen to put forth alternative, realistic applications. Certainly instructors exist who can apply TKD in a meaningful way for self defence purposes. You should have no problem finding realistic applications if you're capable of a little independent work and willing to go a little off the beaten track.

I hope this helps everyone here to understand where im coming from and what i am looking for. Aswell as the reasoning im not in tkd right now, but doing boxing till my fitness is were i want it to be and im ready to start it.

You don't need to be mega fit to start TKD, but hey. Even if you're not going to start now, I'd begin your observation of classes at a few places, it will help.
 
Last edited:

chrispillertkd

Senior Master
Joined
Apr 10, 2007
Messages
2,096
Reaction score
107
Location
Pittsburgh, PA
Someday ill start tkd, not right now the time just isnt right. Im not phyically able to do many of the high flying kicks and such, i have to loose more weight and gain more fitness. So knowing that, istarted learning boxing and am on my 3rd week of it. Its a great martial art, and it gives me a great excersize session 3 times aweek. I have already lost weight since i have started.

Beginning students in Taekwon-Do aren't going to be doing a lot of flying kicks until they get the basics down pretty well. Likewise, a school with good, hard training will lead to weight loss if you attend classes on a regular basis. Those things being said, your training in boxing will certainly help in the weight loss and cardio departments which will help when you do start Taekwon-Do.

I know that not all of what im learning in boxing will transfere over to TKD, but do you experianced TKD teachers and practitioners know what will? Besides the fitness and conditioning im getting will this help me or hinder me when its finaly time to start tkd. I am enjoying boxing and am not going to leave it untill i have made certain fitness and boxing goals for my self.


Master Weiss already pointed out that if the style of Taekwon-Do you end up training in doesn't allow head punches in free sparring then some of the skills you're learning now won't transfer. Hand speed, however, will always help as will things such as cardio and the ability to take a punch when sparring.

Secondly what can you guys tell me about the typical tkd training session at a dojo? At my boxing gym once started its a work out from the word GO! Everything we do reinforces the techniques and also helps in some aspect of the conditioning. Basicly will i get a nice calorie burning work out or does it kinda drop off after warm ups? I ask becuase i did a few months of Karate and after the warm ups it slowed way down and was no longer a work out at all. I ended up quiting becuase if felt i was getting nowhere both fitness wise and martial arts wise.

The best thing to do is to scout around and visit several schools and observe some classes to determine exactly what constitutes a "typical" training session in your area. I know some DaJangs that focus on tournament training and spend a lot of time doing sparring drills, cardio work, etc. Other schools have a more balanced approach to training and split things up equally (or almost equally) between fundamental movements, patterns, pre-arranged sparring, free sparring, and self-defense training. The intensity of training can vary between schools but also between students. I have seen many people over the years walk off the floor after an hour and a half who have barely broken a sweat while others who were at the same class have to wring out their uniforms.

Thirdly, how do i choose a school? I found one school were the teacher has a 4th blackbelt tkd, a 3rd black belt in kempo and a bluebelt in jui jitsu. This school was recommended to me by a mma coach who said that if i didnt train at his school and wanted a tma i should go here. Problem is, this place wants $95 amonth for dues.. Should i keep looking?

The best thing to do in choosing a school is to go and visit them. Sit in a observe classes. Talk to the students and see how they like the training there. Observe them and see how they move when training; are they fluid yet powerful when executing techniques? How do they behave on the training floor; are they focused on training or do they talk instead of train? Are they respectful and courteous to their instructor and each other, both on the floor and off the floor? Observe the instructor; does he teach the majority of classes or is he holed-up in his office? Does he demonstrate the techniques and, when doing so, is he fast and powerful? Talk to the instructor about what you want in a school and what he has to offer. Observe how he treates his students; is he courteous to them? Remember that while he is interviewing you as a potential student you are interviewing him as an instructor.

Fourth, how does the learning of kata(or what ever the tkd version is called) work? How much time is spent in class just working on the forms? How much is dedicated to the application of what is taught in the forms. I have a feeling its the application that is the most important part of the learning, as you are doing it against a person and not air. When i was in the karate place, i was there for 3 months and hadnt even been shown my first form. I watched each class as the higher ups did theres, but was never shown. What was odd, was the higher ups doing there kata never did any application drills of those katas either.

Training three months and never being shown a pattern? That might not be as odd as you think. In many Taekwon-Do schools you don't learn the first pattern until after your first rank promotion. Until then, however, you should have "basic forms" to work on (they're not official patterns but rather fundamental exercises that gets one ready to learn patterns). As for applications, that will depend on the school. Many Taekwon-Do school are light on application training, others do it primarily by taking techniques from patterns and put them into pre-arranged sparring. It will depend on the school. Best thing to do is ask the instructor.

I hope this helps everyone here to understand where im coming from and what i am looking for. Aswell as the reasoning im not in tkd right now, but doing boxing till my fitness is were i want it to be and im ready to start it.

Good luck in your training. Use the time you have now to start generating a list of Taekwon-Do schools in which you're interested and visiting them to observe classes.

Pax,

Chris
 
OP
K

Kframe

Black Belt
Joined
May 9, 2011
Messages
651
Reaction score
12
Location
NE Indiana
Thanks everyone for there imput. I have much to ponder, like why even bother with forms at all? Why not just practice the moves in them during controlled sparring? I know of 1 other school that interests me, tho it is a wtf school as well.. There seam to be only 2 respectable tkd schools here in my town. I did find a church teaching ishinryu karate but i dont want to do that flavor of ma any more. Ill keep looking for some good schools, i keep driving by a ata school and its always hopping and bopping, morbid curiosity is making me want to pop in and take a look.

You guys mention pad work and sparing drills, what kind of pad drills do you do? I know in boxing we practice combinations and movement around the ring, and defensive moves on the pads.

My issue is im not good at working out on my own. That is why i love boxing, i have a structured work out with a coach that is fun and not boring. IM just scared that if i start tkd, i know im going to have to work out on my own for more conditioning and am scared that i dont have the will power to do it by my self.. I have a stationary bike, that i can use on days off, but man its hard to find the will power sometimes to do it on my own. Yet going to boxing is so easy..
 

chrispillertkd

Senior Master
Joined
Apr 10, 2007
Messages
2,096
Reaction score
107
Location
Pittsburgh, PA
My issue is im not good at working out on my own. That is why i love boxing, i have a structured work out with a coach that is fun and not boring. IM just scared that if i start tkd, i know im going to have to work out on my own for more conditioning and am scared that i dont have the will power to do it by my self.. I have a stationary bike, that i can use on days off, but man its hard to find the will power sometimes to do it on my own. Yet going to boxing is so easy..

If you're worried about needing to do extra conditioning work on your own then just continue to go to boxing after you start Taekwon-Do. Perhaps put off starting Taekwon-Do until you've been doing boxing for some time and have a very good grasp of the system, so it's second nature to you. If you're going to cross train it's always good to have a level of proficiency in the primary art/style before beginning a new one. The conditioning you receive from your boxing training will certainly help when you start Taekwon-Do.

FWIW, devloping will power to set and attain goals, including solo training, is one of the results you can get from training in Taekwon-Do (and training should eventually become part of your daily habit) but there's certainly nothing wrong with doing boxing, too.

Pax,

Chris
 

puunui

Senior Master
Joined
Dec 7, 2010
Messages
4,378
Reaction score
26
What will transfer from Boxing to TKD depenmds a lot on the tyoe of TKD you sign up for. If the system does not allow punches to the head when sparring, not so much. If it does allow this then plenty will transfer.

I disagree. I don't think that "punches to the head" is the determining factor; I would say whether the power, speed generation principles would be determining. kukki taekwondo's methodology of gripping the ground and using the earth's power for speed/power generation in both punches and kicks is very similar (if not the same) to how boxing develops power in its punches. One of the reasons why we train and compete on mats is to aid in those concepts. However, at three weeks of boxing training, then I don't think the original poster is working on those types of concepts.

As for boxing's punches to the face, those are easily and naturally adapted to kukki taekwondo, for competition sparring or whatever else.
 

Cyriacus

Senior Master
Joined
Jun 25, 2011
Messages
3,827
Reaction score
47
Location
Australia
Thanks everyone for there imput. I have much to ponder, like why even bother with forms at all? Why not just practice the moves in them during controlled sparring?
Time for a Complex Answer to a Complex Issue. Forms Teach alot. They Teach Combinations, Blocking Idealogies, Body Rotation (180 Turning, 360 Jump Turning, etc), Balance, Coordination, and so on and so forth.

I know of 1 other school that interests me, tho it is a wtf school as well.. There seam to be only 2 respectable tkd schools here in my town. I did find a church teaching ishinryu karate but i dont want to do that flavor of ma any more.

All Karate is different. Isshin Ryu is a bit unlike many other Systems of Karate.

Ill keep looking for some good schools, i keep driving by a ata school and its always hopping and bopping, morbid curiosity is making me want to pop in and take a look.

Im just waiting for someone to pop in and put down the ATA :D

You guys mention pad work and sparing drills, what kind of pad drills do you do? I know in boxing we practice combinations and movement around the ring, and defensive moves on the pads.

You Strike the Pad, You Block the Pad, You practice Accuracy and Form. If the Pad isnt going Straight Back, Youre doing it wrong.

My issue is im not good at working out on my own. That is why i love boxing, i have a structured work out with a coach that is fun and not boring. IM just scared that if i start tkd, i know im going to have to work out on my own for more conditioning and am scared that i dont have the will power to do it by my self..

What the hell gave You that idea? We have people who train one day per week, and theyre fine.

I have a stationary bike, that i can use on days off, but man its hard to find the will power sometimes to do it on my own. Yet going to boxing is so easy..

Of course it is. YOU HAVENT BLOODY TRIED ANYTHING ELSE.

Just My Contribution :)
 
OP
K

Kframe

Black Belt
Joined
May 9, 2011
Messages
651
Reaction score
12
Location
NE Indiana
I have no intention of quiting boxing while im doing tkd. I have only been doing it 3 weeks but man i can already feel a diference. I dont intend to start tkd untill i have a measureable level of proficiency in boxing, which is usually a year, but probably longer due to were i started weight wise and how out of shape i am when i started. What i mean by measurable level of proficiency is when my boxing coach says im ready to compete then ill start cross training but not sooner.

Cyracious thanks for the thoughts on forms, i didnt know they taught all that. AS to the conditioning problems, i just need to man up and do it..

I have always wanted to do TKD.. ever since i saw and heard what it did for my father...
 
OP
K

Kframe

Black Belt
Joined
May 9, 2011
Messages
651
Reaction score
12
Location
NE Indiana
I have been talking to my father about TKD, He is not happy im doing boxing and wants me to quit and do tkd. Of course thats not going to happen for a while till i meet my goals i have set for my self. During our conversation we talked about how his training was like back in the mid 1960's. His classes were usually 2.5-3 hours long, twice a week. They did conditioning as well as technique. Now im curious about which style of tkd my dad did, becuase some of the things he mentions dont sound like things i have read about here and elsewere regarding tkd. He mentions that as you get to the higher belt levels ie brown belt, they start with multi attacker training. Firstly they had him doing 1 steps and later sparring against 2 opponents they continued this for a long time, then they would add a 3rd and start all over. Apparently this came in handy for him, as he was accosted by 3 other people and was able to fend them off and win..(i have talked to people who were there.) He also mentions and demonstrated, lots of throws and counters he was taught. I asked him about mma and why tkd does so poorly in it and that alot of guys get taken down to the ground and thats were i got a huge surprise.. His teacher taught him some basic ground defenses, nothing like what is in judo or jiu jitsu but he is comfortable fighting off of his back. He demonstrated his punches and some sweeps he was taught off his back, and some manuvers to quickly gethim self back on his feet. Apparently ground and pound has been around for a long time, as he got into a fight at a bar and threw some guy down and got on top and beat the marmalaid out of him.. The throw he used was unique as well.. It was something were he grabbed him then fell backward and threw the guy with is legs over his head. (again i have talked to witnesses regarding this.)

I wounder which style he took, i found a old grading plaque, and it has some 8th dans name on it, a korean name, ill find it and post it up. It may help to shed light on what my dad learned. He dosent understand my apprehension to joining a school and just doing it. I keep trying to tell him, tkd isnt taught the way he was taught anymore and that finding a school of the caliber he attended is going to be hard. He told me he took his classes at a friggin YMCA!!! (which i checked into and there are no tkd classes at any of the local ymcas). I asked him why in all the videos of tkd black belts getting whomped on, do they always lead with high kicks and mid kicks only to be taken down and pummled. He watched some of the videos and said that they are throwing there kicks poorly, and with bad form. I asked about the only hitting towards the head and he mentioned he was trained to, and is very comfortable with kicking at the lower extremities as well as the higher ones. (man if i could only find a school that teaches the way he was taught, id join right the heck now..) I asked him about a video were i saw a asian guy street fighting a big black guy, and he threw a kick to the guys side. The other guy cuaght it and pushed the fighter away.(hopping on one foot) He said, he was tuaght ways to deal with having his legs caught, but couldnt demonstrate due to lack of space and being in the wrong cloths and not wanting to kick me..

I wounder if the rising popularity of MMA will affect the way tkd is taught in the future. I think it will be a fun and interesting evolution. Any thoughts on that guys??
 

Cyriacus

Senior Master
Joined
Jun 25, 2011
Messages
3,827
Reaction score
47
Location
Australia
I have been talking to my father about TKD, He is not happy im doing boxing and wants me to quit and do tkd. Of course thats not going to happen for a while till i meet my goals i have set for my self. During our conversation we talked about how his training was like back in the mid 1960's. His classes were usually 2.5-3 hours long, twice a week. They did conditioning as well as technique. Now im curious about which style of tkd my dad did, becuase some of the things he mentions dont sound like things i have read about here and elsewere regarding tkd. He mentions that as you get to the higher belt levels ie brown belt, they start with multi attacker training. Firstly they had him doing 1 steps and later sparring against 2 opponents they continued this for a long time, then they would add a 3rd and start all over. Apparently this came in handy for him, as he was accosted by 3 other people and was able to fend them off and win..(i have talked to people who were there.) He also mentions and demonstrated, lots of throws and counters he was taught. I asked him about mma and why tkd does so poorly in it and that alot of guys get taken down to the ground and thats were i got a huge surprise.. His teacher taught him some basic ground defenses, nothing like what is in judo or jiu jitsu but he is comfortable fighting off of his back. He demonstrated his punches and some sweeps he was taught off his back, and some manuvers to quickly gethim self back on his feet. Apparently ground and pound has been around for a long time, as he got into a fight at a bar and threw some guy down and got on top and beat the marmalaid out of him.. The throw he used was unique as well.. It was something were he grabbed him then fell backward and threw the guy with is legs over his head.

​Sacrifice Throw

(again i have talked to witnesses regarding this.)

I wounder which style he took, i found a old grading plaque, and it has some 8th dans name on it, a korean name, ill find it and post it up. It may help to shed light on what my dad learned. He dosent understand my apprehension to joining a school and just doing it. I keep trying to tell him, tkd isnt taught the way he was taught anymore and that finding a school of the caliber he attended is going to be hard. He told me he took his classes at a friggin YMCA!!! (which i checked into and there are no tkd classes at any of the local ymcas). I asked him why in all the videos of tkd black belts getting whomped on, do they always lead with high kicks and mid kicks only to be taken down and pummled. He watched some of the videos and said that they are throwing there kicks poorly, and with bad form. I asked about the only hitting towards the head and he mentioned he was trained to, and is very comfortable with kicking at the lower extremities as well as the higher ones. (man if i could only find a school that teaches the way he was taught, id join right the heck now..) I asked him about a video were i saw a asian guy street fighting a big black guy, and he threw a kick to the guys side. The other guy cuaght it and pushed the fighter away.(hopping on one foot) He said, he was tuaght ways to deal with having his legs caught, but couldnt demonstrate due to lack of space and being in the wrong cloths and not wanting to kick me..

Correct - A well angled kick is alarmingly hard to catch.

I wounder if the rising popularity of MMA will affect the way tkd is taught in the future. I think it will be a fun and interesting evolution. Any thoughts on that guys??
No, it wont. MMA doesnt affect anything.
Some things affect themselves to be inclined towards Competition, which includes MMA.
 
OP
K

Kframe

Black Belt
Joined
May 9, 2011
Messages
651
Reaction score
12
Location
NE Indiana
Thanks for the name of that throw cyraicus, i have been watching videos of it online and it looks hard to do.. I was watching this video here,
about the various takedown defenses. I had no idea that TKD had all that in it, or was that involved. I guess its one of those things in life were searching for the wheat amongst the chaff is important, especially with so many schools out there peddling chaff..

I truely wonder what the true story behind some of the tkd vs mma videos i see on the web are. Its as if a few videos of bad performances by a few people mostly olympic practitioners is giving the whole art a bad name...
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Cyriacus

Senior Master
Joined
Jun 25, 2011
Messages
3,827
Reaction score
47
Location
Australia
Thanks for the name of that throw cyraicus, i have been watching videos of it online and it looks hard to do.. I was watching this video here,
about the various takedown defenses. I had no idea that TKD had all that in it, or was that involved. I guess its one of those things in life were searching for the wheat amongst the chaff is important, especially with so many schools out there peddling chaff..

I truely wonder what the true story behind some of the tkd vs mma videos i see on the web are. Its as if a few videos of bad performances by a few people mostly olympic practitioners is giving the whole art a bad name...
Spot on. Alot of TKD Gyms specialise to the Sport Side, and let everything else crease out. TKD has Grappling (Not BJJ Style), Takedowns, Takedown Defenses, Punches, Kicks, Elbows, Knees, Headbutts, Knifehands, Ridgehands, Forearm Strikes, Stomps, Throws, and so forth. Its just a matter of if the Dojang teaches it or not.

Plus, the reason You see so few Full TKD Practitioners in MMA, is the same reason You dont see Full Karatekas or Wing Chun Stylists. Theyre comfortable in their own Style, and arent in it for Competition.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Top