Question on buying sword online.

Tanaka

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Hello,

I have a question about buying the 9260 steel sword from Cheness. The Cheness website has the sword on back order, but I've seen their swords on other websites as well.
Does anyone know how it works? Do they have to get their swords from Cheness whenever someone buys?
Or do these website companies keep their own stock of the cheness swords.
 

jks9199

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You'll probably need to ask the company in question. Some may order a sizable quantity, and sell them until they sell out; others may simply be an ordering service. One clue might be if they have a physical store as well as the e-store.
 
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Tanaka

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You'll probably need to ask the company in question. Some may order a sizable quantity, and sell them until they sell out; others may simply be an ordering service. One clue might be if they have a physical store as well as the e-store.

You know, I'm wondering why I didn't think of that.
I ended up calling them and finding out that they do order directly from cheness.

So my next question... Does anyone know of any places that might keep cheness 9260 steel swords in stock?
Either that or I have to wait a month from now for backorder.
 

Sukerkin

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I would suggest getting in touch with Cheness directly. They do have their own site:

http://www.chenessinc.com/

They've been at this for a couple of years now and altho' their blades are made in China and they have had some quality control issues in the past, they do have a pretty good customer service reputation as far as Internet word-of-mouth goes.

I nearly bought from them myself a while back but went with Tozando instead in the end as I wanted a top-quality katana rather than buy a cheaper one first only to have to buy another as I improved.
 
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Tanaka

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I would suggest getting in touch with Cheness directly. They do have their own site:

http://www.chenessinc.com/

They've been at this for a couple of years now and altho' their blades are made in China and they have had some quality control issues in the past, they do have a pretty good customer service reputation as far as Internet word-of-mouth goes.

I nearly bought from them myself a while back but went with Tozando instead in the end as I wanted a top-quality katana rather than buy a cheaper one first only to have to buy another as I improved.
Quality in the blade or quality in the fittings?

Because they admitted that their fittings are ordered from alternative companies.
But they claim their blades are best priced for their ability. I've also watched some demo cutting videos and was impressed for the price. But I have already contacted Cheness. Found out their swords are on backorder for a month or so. Which isn't long.
I just wanted to know if someone else might have a stock that they were selling.

So far it looks like I'm going to have to wait.
 

Sukerkin

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Aye, the long wait it is by the looks of things. To put it in perspective, if you were buying a 'proper' katana, waiting six months to a year is not abnormal.

As to 'quality' in the Cheness product, if you mean is the blade likely to break if you do tamashagiri, then, no, it isn't. It might not be exactly profiled and balanced 'correctly' but it will do the job. The fittings have taken some flak over the years but they do have a good record when it comes to sorting things out. The primary complaint has been badly made and badly fitted tsuka but I haven't heard any horror stories for a while.

The fellow who runs the company is a genuine bloke and he will tell you himself that the Cheness range is not really intended to be an alternative to the top-end blades you can get from Japan. They are intended to be a reasonably priced way for people to get a blade for iaido or whatever sword-art they practise.
 

Brian R. VanCise

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Personally I would wait and buy a slightly higher end sword. Then again I generally error on the side of quality because of having bought poor quality past!
 
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Tanaka

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Personally I would wait and buy a slightly higher end sword. Then again I generally error on the side of quality because of having bought poor quality past!
Yeah that is probably a very smart move to do.
I really just want a sword for cutting purposes though.
Don't care about cosmetic much as long as it does the job. lol I'm afraid if I do get a highly expensive sword I would be scared to use it.
 
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Tanaka

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The fellow who runs the company is a genuine bloke and he will tell you himself that the Cheness range is not really intended to be an alternative to the top-end blades you can get from Japan. They are intended to be a reasonably priced way for people to get a blade for iaido or whatever sword-art they practise.

Yeah that's what I picked up after doing research on Cheness.
 

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Yeah that is probably a very smart move to do.
I really just want a sword for cutting purposes though.
Don't care about cosmetic much as long as it does the job. lol I'm afraid if I do get a highly expensive sword I would be scared to use it.

What are you cutting?
Are you using the sword for anythig else? iaido?
Or is this just something to have a bit of fun with in the backyard?
 

pgsmith

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Don't care about cosmetic much as long as it does the job.
That's a large problem with Japanese swords, because you really can't separate the two very much. If the handle is poorly shaped, the wrap is not well done, the fittings are sub-standard, you could pass that off as "cosmetic". However, a poorly shaped or fitted handle can be extremely dangerous, and result in a flying sword (bad news!). Likewise, a poor handle wrap can allow slippage, poor quality fittings won't stay connected properly. Here's an example from a cheness sword that I looked at last week ... one of our guys brought it in for me to check out (I think he said it was a Tenchi?). I swung it around a few times, and immediately figured out that it was extremely tip heavy for a sword with bohi, and that the blade was not properly aligned with the handle, meaning that you had to hold it the tiniest bit twisted in order to have the blade straight.
You pretty much get what you pay for in the Japanese sword world since it takes a lot of time and skill to properly put together a Japanese sword. If you're going to buy an inexpensive sword, I would recommend buying from a somewhere that thoroughly inspects their swords prior to selling such as Bugei or Sei Do Kai.
 
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Tanaka

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What are you cutting?
Are you using the sword for anythig else? iaido?
Or is this just something to have a bit of fun with in the backyard?
Tatami.
It is personal thing I do. Until I decide which school to join. The trouble is I don't plan on living where I am living for very long. So until I clear that up it's just personal, and when I am settled I'll find a nice school. To join others to learn more and have people around me that do the same thing. If I had a master to show me... I probably wouldn't have to ask these questions online. lol.
 
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Tanaka

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That's a large problem with Japanese swords, because you really can't separate the two very much. If the handle is poorly shaped, the wrap is not well done, the fittings are sub-standard, you could pass that off as "cosmetic". However, a poorly shaped or fitted handle can be extremely dangerous, and result in a flying sword (bad news!). Likewise, a poor handle wrap can allow slippage, poor quality fittings won't stay connected properly. Here's an example from a cheness sword that I looked at last week ... one of our guys brought it in for me to check out (I think he said it was a Tenchi?). I swung it around a few times, and immediately figured out that it was extremely tip heavy for a sword with bohi, and that the blade was not properly aligned with the handle, meaning that you had to hold it the tiniest bit twisted in order to have the blade straight.
You pretty much get what you pay for in the Japanese sword world since it takes a lot of time and skill to properly put together a Japanese sword. If you're going to buy an inexpensive sword, I would recommend buying from a somewhere that thoroughly inspects their swords prior to selling such as Bugei or Sei Do Kai.

Well I didn't think Cheness would be lacking there. Since I was seeing a lot of impressive reviews and feedback from people(not related to cheness) website. Thank you for sharing that example. I mostly saw them complaining about the fittings.
 
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Ken Morgan

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Well I didn't think Cheness would be lacking there. Since I was seeing a lot of impressive reviews and feedback from people(not related to cheness) website. Thank you for sharing that example. I mostly saw them complaining about the fittings.

For what you want to do, be careful, but go for it.

For any type of serious practice, you will need something much better then what you plan on purchasing. That sword would not be acceptable in our dojo. You would be strongly encouraged to buy something else.

I've been practicing JSA for 11 years and I have done tamesigiri only twice, its a mess, scratches the blade, and I know through experience that my cuts will go through whatever target I set up. I've done it, I know it works, its no longer important to me. I've moved on.
 
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Tanaka

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For what you want to do, be careful, but go for it.

For any type of serious practice, you will need something much better then what you plan on purchasing. That sword would not be acceptable in our dojo. You would be strongly encouraged to buy something else.

I've been practicing JSA for 11 years and I have done tamesigiri only twice, its a mess, scratches the blade, and I know through experience that my cuts will go through whatever target I set up. I've done it, I know it works, its no longer important to me. I've moved on.
Yeah for safety reason I understand why.

I see where you're coming from.
I just want to see if my cuts are good cuts or sloppy.
And from what I hear tatami is a good way to find out.

But I see where you're coming from.
How much do practitioners in your dojo normally spend on a sword?
I will get a proper katana in the very near future when I join a school. Just right now I want a katana that can be used for cutting and easily replaced if all goes wrong.
 

Sukerkin

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I think it is time for us to emphasise that 'cutting' when you are untrained is in the same ballpark as driving when you are untrained. You'll more than likely be alright but you are putting yourself and those around you in unnecesary danger. A three foot long razor blade has a habit of biting the unwary (all of us here will have cut ourselves at some time or other whilst learning).

All the suggestions and comments that have been made above have been predicated on the fact that you are a student being instructed by a qualified sensei in one of the sword arts.

If you are not such a student, then purchasing and using a edged weapon is not something to be recommended. Bear in mind that in most traditional schools of swordsmanship you are not permitted to use a live blade until you have a number of years of experience.

As such, I would personally encourage you to either buy an iaito or better still wait until you are under tuition and allow your sensei to guide you with regard to what you buy.
 
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Sukerkin

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In terms of price, then as much as you can afford is the mantra when it comes to swords.

You can get a decent enough iaito for a couple of hundred Pounds but such a low-end piece will normally require replacing after a few years as your skill improves.

I went through two swords before I ended up with my 'main' practise blade and I could have saved myself some money in the long run by just buying the one I use now in the first place :D. That one cost me about the equivalent of $1000 as the exchange rate stood at the time and one of my fellow students has a live-blade that he paid $2000+ for.

Those costs account to some extent for why there are so few iaidoka about in the world, I am sure :lol:. But, in the long term, as it is an art that you will be practising all your life, it works out relatively cheap.
 
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Tanaka

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I think it is time for us to emphasise that 'cutting' when you are untrained is in the same ballpark as driving when you are untrained. You'll more than likely be alright but you are putting yourself and those around you in unnecesary danger. A three foot long razor blade has a habit of biting the unwary (all of us here will have cut ourselves at some time or other whilst learning).

All the suggestions and comments that have been made above have been predicated on the fact that you are a student being instructed by a qualified sensei in one of the sword arts.

If you are not such a student, then purchasing and using a edged weapon is not something to be recommended. Bear in mind that in most traditional schools of swordsmanship you are not permitted to use a live blade until you have a number of years of experience.

As such, I would personally encourage you to either buy an iaito or better still wait until you are under tuition and allow your sensei to guide you with regard to what you buy.

Yeah I understand completely. I understand the risk of swinging an edged weapon.
Which is why I do it in my own privacy with no one around. So if anyone gets hurt it would be myself.
I've done a lot of things by myself and I've also been a solo person. I just recently became a more social person. (not saying I didn't talk to anyone, just very selective)

All of my hobbies have always been very dangerous ones that could cause me permanent injuries for life or fatal.
So I do practice this with utmost safety in mind. And I will definitely find a school in the future.(Probably in like a month or so) I'm actually visiting a lot of schools lately to see how they are and to find out legit schools. Probably might be even sooner.
 
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Tanaka

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In terms of price, then as much as you can afford is the mantra when it comes to swords.

You can get a decent enough iaito for a couple of hundred Pounds but such a low-end piece will normally require replacing after a few years as your skill improves.

I went through two swords before I ended up with my 'main' practise blade and I could have saved myself some money in the long run by just buying the one I use now in the first place :D. That one cost me about the equivalent of $1000 as the exchange rate stood at the time and one of my fellow students has a live-blade that he paid $2000+ for.

Those costs account to some extent for why there are so few iaidoka about in the world, I am sure :lol:. But, in the long term, as it is an art that you will be practising all your life, it works out relatively cheap.

Ah, that's not bad of a price.
 
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Tanaka

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I thank you guys for your advice for me.
I'll probably just wait like you guys say.

Again. Thank you.
 

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