Nunchucks in California for USAT Jr Olympics?

terryl965

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Just send an email directly to Mark Kaughmann. He usually emails me back with in a day.
mark.kaufmann@usa-taekwondo.us
Or Bill Kellick @
Bill.Kellick@usa-taekwondo.us

They have both responded to many of my emails to them pretty quickly.

Lucky you with Mark, man you must be special
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, the only one that returns anything for me is Steve Thompson.
 

Bill Mattocks

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FYI, by way of illustration on the laws in California:

http://blogs.pe.com/news/digest/2011/04/ontario-beaumont-man-detained.html

ONTARIO: Man with illegal weapon detained at airport

By PE News on April 26, 2011 10:00 AM
Here's a tip for easier flying: Don't carry a martial arts weapon that is illegal for sale in California in your carry-on bag.
A Beaumont man was detained this morning at Ontario International Airport after scanners searched his bag and found a kubotan — a small, collapsible baton used in hand-to-hand fighting.

Now I will grant you that a kubaton is not a set of nunchaku. And this guy did not have the excuse that he was on his way to a martial arts competition. And furthermore, he did not have it in his checked bag; it was in his carryon.

However, the facts remain. The nunchaku is illegal in California - and there is no exemption in the law for carrying it in from out-of-state for a competition. If the O/P had decided to pack his nunchaku in checked or carryon luggage AND it had been discovered, he'd have been arrested.

And those of you who advised him to just do it anyway because you have done it and never been caught, or because you think cops ought to exercise more common sense, YOU would not be offering to pay his legal bills right about now, would you?

I'm going to put this one in the "I told you so" file with your kind indulgence.
 

miguksaram

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And those of you who advised him to just do it anyway because you have done it and never been caught, or because you think cops ought to exercise more common sense, YOU would not be offering to pay his legal bills right about now, would you?

The whole "Are you going to pay his legal bill?" question is just stupid.

If you advise a student of yours to practice the sai the same way your instructor taught you (to run with them them) will you pay their medical bill if they trip and stab themselves? If you recommend a restaurant saying they have great food and service based on your experience and the people you recommend it to go there and get horrible food, crappy service you will pay their food bill right?

Come on...according to that line of logic, you should not give opinions based on experience to anyone unless you are certified on that subject to do so. The bottom line is the opinion that was gave was based on experience. The words that were used was 'SHOULD be'...not 'definitely will be', not 'no problems at all', no 'get out of jail free card'.

Allow me to add this to the I told you so section. Golden Gate Nationals was just held in Santa Clara, California. It was an open martial arts tournament where people with nunchaku attended to perform in weapons division. Not one person was arrested on their way to the tournament, at the tournament, or coming back from the tournament for illegal weapons.

Hmmmm...
 

Bill Mattocks

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The whole "Are you going to pay his legal bill?" question is just stupid.

If you advise a student of yours to practice the sai the same way your instructor taught you (to run with them them) will you pay their medical bill if they trip and stab themselves? If you recommend a restaurant saying they have great food and service based on your experience and the people you recommend it to go there and get horrible food, crappy service you will pay their food bill right?

Come on...according to that line of logic, you should not give opinions based on experience to anyone unless you are certified on that subject to do so. The bottom line is the opinion that was gave was based on experience. The words that were used was 'SHOULD be'...not 'definitely will be', not 'no problems at all', no 'get out of jail free card'.

Allow me to add this to the I told you so section. Golden Gate Nationals was just held in Santa Clara, California. It was an open martial arts tournament where people with nunchaku attended to perform in weapons division. Not one person was arrested on their way to the tournament, at the tournament, or coming back from the tournament for illegal weapons.

Hmmmm...

Poor logic. The fact that people don't often get pulled over for speeding does not make speeding legal, nor does it stop the police from writing tickets for speeding.

And giving advice on using a sai is not the same as advising someone to break the law just because one has noticed that people break that law all the time and don't often get caught.

The fact is, such weapons are against the law in California, and there is no exception to it for taking the weapons to a tournament. The people you mentioned all broke the law, apparently. They did not get caught - good for them. But if they had been caught, they'd have been arrested - I think we can see that pretty clearly as the new story shows just happened at the airport in Ontario, CA.

So giving someone advice to break the law remains a bad idea. And my suggestion is that if you are not planning to pay for their legal defense, advising them to break the law is a poor idea.

Imagine if the O/P had done as several had advised, and it was HIS name in the news for carrying nunchaku and getting arrested. Which of those who advised him to do so would speak up and say "Whoops, my bad, let me get out my checkbook?" More like refuse to address the subject and tiptoe quietly away is more like it.

We all get that the law is seldom enforced. It's still the law, and as we see, when it does get enforced, people get arrested. That tends to ruin one's weekend, eh?
 

miguksaram

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Poor logic. The fact that people don't often get pulled over for speeding does not make speeding legal, nor does it stop the police from writing tickets for speeding.

And giving advice on using a sai is not the same as advising someone to break the law just because one has noticed that people break that law all the time and don't often get caught.

But it is...you are basically telling someone to take a dangerous somewhat heavy weapon with a pointed in and run with it while learning to manipulate it. This is a health risk...Granted people don't often slip and fall and stab themselves with it but that doesn't make it any less of risk does it? Are you are certified personal trainer or a physician to be doling out advice on this type of exercise?

The fact is, such weapons are against the law in California, and there is no exception to it for taking the weapons to a tournament. The people you mentioned all broke the law, apparently. They did not get caught - good for them. But if they had been caught, they'd have been arrested - I think we can see that pretty clearly as the new story shows just happened at the airport in Ontario, CA.
You are absolutely right. Funny how this and other big venues tend to slip by the police every year. You would think with the financial crisis they were having this would be one hell of a money maker in fines.

So giving someone advice to break the law remains a bad idea. And my suggestion is that if you are not planning to pay for their legal defense, advising them to break the law is a poor idea.

Imagine if the O/P had done as several had advised, and it was HIS name in the news for carrying nunchaku and getting arrested. Which of those who advised him to do so would speak up and say "Whoops, my bad, let me get out my checkbook?" More like refuse to address the subject and tiptoe quietly away is more like it.

And how many times have you offered to pay for someone's dinner when you dished out bad advice on a restaurant?

I'm guessing you said "really, wow it was great when I tried it. Sorry"

We all get that the law is seldom enforced. It's still the law, and as we see, when it does get enforced, people get arrested. That tends to ruin one's weekend, eh?
The real question is how did that guy even get on the plane with that in his carry on in the first place?
 
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