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army

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okay my name is parick hassler, i'm currently deployed in afghanastin with the army, only real trianing i have is army combatives level 1, nothing but a little jiu-jtisu *spell*, and a thats about all i have, my goal is to trian in MMA style, its more of a realistic fighting style for thignns that could actually take place not only in my career but also on the street. i want to find a work out plan that i can start so i can be in shape for when i go home and start the true training. anyways thanks for your time, and hope to talk to alot of you on here.
 

morph4me

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Hello Patrick, welcome to MT:) Thank you for your service. Keep your head down and cover your six.
 

tshadowchaser

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Welcome to the forum
Ask question you might need or want answeres to any time
Be safe and thanks for your service to our country
 

Brian R. VanCise

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Welcome to MartialTalk!
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army

army

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well thank you all it actually means alot for someone to say thanks for your service, only question i really have is whats a good workout plan for the gym so i can get in better shape for mma type training cuase i'm not trying to fight but more for self-defence and fitness
 

bowser666

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Welcome to the forums!! If you are planning on training in MMA , Cardio cardio , cardio !!!! Please also keep in mind that MMA is very limited in a SD aspect. If you are looking for SD there are MA's that will better suit you. MMA is sport fighting , don't forget that.


Thanks for your service and I hope you are able to make it back to the states to train.
 
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army

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thats all i keep getting is alot of cardio, i'm looking to see what i sould do in the gym to help get some muscle on on my sides and pretty much everywhere so i can take the hits a little bit better.

thanks agian
 

Kacey

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Welcome, and happy posting! :wavey:

Thanks for your service to our country. :asian:
 

Brian King

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“i'm currently deployed in afghanastin with the army, only real trianing i have is army combatives level 1, nothing but a little jiu-jtisu *spell*, and a thats about all i have, my goal is to trian in MMA style, its more of a realistic fighting style for thignns that could actually take place not only in my career but also on the street. i want to find a work out plan that i can start so i can be in shape for when i go home and start the true training”

I wonder if I alone found the above thoughts very ironic?

+1 to the many thanks for your service. Enjoy the thanks that you get sir they are well deserved. Things have not always been so with people giving thanks for military service and as that has changed it will change again so appreciate and understand the thanks that you do get.

Hello Patrick and welcome to Martial Talk.

I do not know you or what your MOS is or the size of the post you are stationed at (no ones business on a public forum) but I do have a few ideas for you to consider. First I congratulate you on seeking to get a better understanding of martial skills; many in uniform (military and law enforcement) do not seek to do so for whatever reason, and in failing to do so put themselves and their comrades in danger. As an action professional you owe it to yourself and those that employ you and to those that are around you to be a professional and to be the best that your ability allows.

A professional has to train their eyes and mind to recognize all the training opportunities around them, and to seek them out. You say Patrick that you have been trained in Army combatives level 1. I wonder if that is true. I know that you have been exposed to it, have rolled around a bit with it, but do you know it. Sure the techniques are very basic, but many a fight has been won and many an experienced fighter has been caught with ‘basic’ techniques, perfectly timed and executed. If level 1 is all you the training that you have at the current moment then I challenge you to get so good at it that you can use it against anyone, anywhere and at anytime, MASTER it (the material and yourself)if you can. Can you do the techniques blindfolded, can you do the techniques while wearing your gear (including armor), and can you do the techniques with your rifle in your hand? All of these can be practiced with the help of a training buddy or two. Practice with other professionals (you may have to develop them with-in your unit, if so do so), practice late at night outside in the dark and the quiet of the night, practice outside in the dirt, practice on bricks, cement and rocks. Learn from experience how to use the environment to your advantage and how it can be used against you. After do this if you think that you now have level 1 mastered start training against two opponents. Start and work slow paying attention to not how often they win but on how often you can get them to interfere with each other, how you can manipulate one to help you defeat the other then work the other. Ok after awhile two people is not so scary, so now arm one with a blade, then arm both. Again do not worry so much that you are often getting killed, that is why you start with a training blade or sheathed blade so that the blood loss will be kept to an acceptable minimum. Instead of competing to see who can win in this situation start to see how they can be interfered with so that their combined movements are not efficient, see the connection that all three of you have by moving your own body about and seeing how it effects their bodies, start to notice how you can often get them to stab/slash their partner or themselves instead of you. Another way to practice this is you are armed (handgun or blade) and they are not but your weapon is holstered or sheathed and you have to access it while rolling with two, again notice not the competition but rather learn how people (you and they) can become weapon fixated and learn how to use that to your advantage.

Think you have level 1 mastered now? Try to limit yourself. Can you do the techniques using your legs only? Can you escape the techniques just using body movement? Try rolling with your partner(s) and limit yourself to using just one arm (simulating being wounded) or no hands. Do the training when you are all so sweaty that getting grips is near impossible.

While deployed over there get as much ummm non-real training as you can get. Go to the firing ranges/areas and shoot as much as possible, shoot left handed, shoot one handed and if possible shoot while moving that includes going to the ground and getting up off the ground so many learn to shoot well while standing and while on the ground but forget that the fight continues on the way to the ground and on the way up from the ground. This is also a truth in unarmed and bladed work.

While deployed over there learn from others. There are people around that have seen the elephant, watch how they move, see their ingrained habits and learn from it. If you notice that someone does something a little out of the ordinary ask them why (with an interest in learning not challenging) If you see someone and they are wearing their equipment differently than others to figure out why they are doing so. Start to notice the little things and learn to pay attention.

While deployed over there volunteer to work at different ranges and details and duties. Learn from them.

“i'm looking to see what i sould do in the gym to help get some muscle on on my sides and pretty much everywhere so i can take the hits a little bit better.”

If you can go to the gym, post a note on the bulletin board seeking training partner, there might be somebody very knowledgeable right near you also seeking a practice dummy err I mean training partner LOL

Regarding muscles to help you take a hit a little better, I am of the opinion that while they can help to pad, they can also possibly limit your movement and your endurance. Keep in mind that in your profession you may have to walk 20 miles uphill before you engage in combat and a lot of extra weight tells on your performance. Rather than a lot of weight lifting to get ‘big’ I would and do recommend more body weight exercises and the more of those that you can do with a partner or three the better. Take the push up for instance, just get into the front leaning rest and hold it for ten or fifteen minutes (two or five for non professionals) and see what you learn. Your body will tell you where you are weak and lacking, it might be breathing, or in your chest, your arms or your lower back etc. In that position you body will not lie to you.
Some partner body weight exercises to give you a few ideas.
Partner pushups with weapon. One partner lays on their back and lifts their arms up like they are in the front leaning rest with a rifle held up (a chain or length of rope is also interesting) their partner now gets in the front leaning rest over the partner also using the same rifle. The tow can have their feet and heads facing the same direction with one right over the top of the other, or they can form a type of line so that their heads are one above the other but their feet are on opposite ends. Now both do the push-ups at the same time. It is interesting work as the guy on the bottom has to worry about eating the rifle as well as is his partner crashing down on them, while the person on the top also has worries as the angles of the bottom persons arms effect the person on the top making their work possibly much more difficult.
A threesome push up can be done like the above (the line version with feet at opposite ends but the heads of the two lined up and instead of a rifle (or with whatever) one partner makes a fist and the other palms that fist (one partner may make a fist in both hands or one hand so that they alternate) the third partner goes into the front leaning rest at the feet of the upper partner but instead of placing his fists on the ground he places them on the legs of the upper partner. Then all together they do a number of push-ups (say 10-30) then immediately switch positions and repeat so that all get to learn from each position.
The idea is to of course get the benefit from the exercise (if done slowly the tendons and ligaments will get very strong) but to get comfortable with close body contact and to learn how balance and timing and breathing can be affected by another.

A few quick ideas to get you started if you want. Your mileage may vary of course

Again thanks for your service
Warmest regards
Brian King
 
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army

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brian,
i want to say thank you i never thought about alot of the things you said. it seem like you have some military back ground also? i do have combatives level one but n like you said i don't have it mastered to the point where i can do it blindfolded or even close like you mentioned so that gives me one thik to work on. and as you can imagin theres not alo of poeple who enjoy doing combatives here which sucks i am the only one in my company of signal personnal that actually enjoy doing it, i have a sgt that wants me to teach her combatives one but i don't feel 100% confortable teaching her cuase i don't know everything and i just know the basics. and regards the body and weight training i like our suggestions but i'm in a comppany of lazy asses....i have to go to the gym either by mself or with guys who are going outside the wire everyday, i really do want to say thank you for taking the time to write what you did it means alot and i will use some of the suggestions. take care and hope to be talking to you alot more.
 

Brian King

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“i want to say thank you i never thought about alot of the things you said.”

Your welcome sir.

“it seem like you have some military back ground also?”

LOL I am willing to bet that I got out before you were born, so it was a long time ago. My MOS was 12E and I had a 12B secondary (for those of you not in the military or the US Army specifically MOS stands for Military Occupational Specialty or at least it did in the early 1980’s. The number stands for the branch of the Army in my case 12 being Engineer 11 being infantry etc. The letter stands for a specific type of job within that branch. In my case E and B. E stood for Atomic Demolition Munitions and B stood for Combat Engineer.

“as you can imagin theres not alo of poeple who enjoy doing combatives here which sucks i am the only one in my company of signal personnal that actually enjoy doing it”

It is understandable to a point and it is human nature. Try to make your training more fun than work. Everyone loves to rough house as children; we all wrestled and rolled about. Find that feeling and you will find training partners. It does not have to be hard core competitive maximum resistance all the time, just some of the time.

“i have a sgt that wants me to teach her combatives one but i don't feel 100% confortable teaching her cuase i don't know everything and i just know the basics”

There you go, a training partner. Just be honest to your Sergeant right from the start, let her know that you are willing to teach her what you know which is not much and is incomplete and you are hoping that together you both can learn the material forward and backward. Get some reference material to refresh your memory and give it a go. Also Patrick, with a good training partner you can get very good, iron sharpens iron, but only if your goal both your and your training partners is to get better by making the other better. By both focusing on making the other better you will help each other, you will point out to each other how to make a lock a little more painful or where you felt vulnerable to a strike during a specific movement. Remember that it is not the quantity of the material but the quality. The two of you working may attract others which will provide more bodies to learn on. The other thing to remember is that the work you both do today may make a big difference if ever needed tomorrow.

“and regards the body and weight training i like our suggestions but i'm in a comppany of lazy asses....”


Make the exercises fun (laughter is allowed and should be hard to contain) and physically challenging. By challenging I do not necessarily mean physically hard or impossible but I do mean that it will require some coordination to do so. Work with your Sergeant at first. When others see her doing this and getting stronger and more coordinated and healthier they may in turn grow interested.

If I remember my Army days correctly we did a lot of push-ups but we always were going for maximum repetitions in order to pass the PT tests. Here is a variation that you might try. Get into the front leaning rest but do it beside a wall that is at least three or four feet high (smoother the better) and so that the wall is running along side your body. This is just a five push up routine but many find it difficult. With the wall beside you (six or eight inches away) you do one nice and slow push up, about a three or for count (count out loud one two three and at three be at the bottom of the push up, one two three out loud brings you back to the front leaning rest), then take the hand nearest the wall and place it about a palm width from the bottom of the wall (staying in the front leaning rest the whole time) now do another push up at the same count you did before, all the way down and all the way up, now that you are back up in the front leaning rest (albeit with one hand on the wall and the other on the ground) move the hand on the wall up about a foot and again repeat your count down and up, then again move the hand up another foot…see the pattern? After the fourth time that you raise the hand that is on the wall you then repeat it once more at that level (doing it two times at the highest) and then lower the hand one foot and repeat your count, lower your hand one foot and repeat your count until both hands are back on the ground. Then immediately turn around so that you can work the other hand. That is the beginner method. The intermediate method is that you not only raise your hand but you also raise the nearest foot as well, so that you have both your near arm and near leg against the wall and raising higher at each progression.

I hope that you are getting the idea on how to make your everyday routine a little more challenging while getting a fuller workout.

Good luck
Warmest regards
Brian King
 

matt.m

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Welcome,

Look man, you are doing "Real Training". Take it from me. I was active duty U.S.M.C. from 92-97. I am here to tell you......after being in combat on 4 continents and 1 island, participant with the All Marine Judo and Wrestling teams you are getting as real as it gets.

Take it from me, if you aren't being shot at then it is a piece of cake. You will take your discipline to the dojang you arrive at and take that class to a whole new level. Just watch, it won't be readily apparent but it will happen.

Hey, there are a lot of us Ol' timers that wore a uniform on the boards. Not only that but this is quite a vet and currently serving personnel friendly board.

I salute and welcome you my friend and thank you for carrying on the mission I could no longer do. I had to get out due to bad knees and bad back.

IM and add me as a friend. The GM our org. was a chaplains assisstant in the Army during Vietnam, 2 of my judo students are Army vets. One recently got home from Iraq. The other did the Panama thing with the 101st.

You are doing real training now man, just make it home to have fun in the dojang. My student is a green belt in the Army's Jiu Jitsu. I just promoted him to Yellow in Judo. Also, talk to: Letch, he is a good ol boy jarhead. I know the uniform has a different name tape but who cares. I know we dont. Terry, IcemanSK, Drac, and Shesulsa have been great pals. Very pro vet.
 
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