My self-defense opinion, for whatever that is worth?

Em MacIntosh

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Not that I'm a good boxer but I find if you use boxing out of the ring it's best used as a fighting retreat. While backing up to either side at the right time, take advantage of their aggression with stop hits. I think the greatest aspect of boxing (it definitely depends on the fighter...) is the mobility of the torso. It's a lot easier to roll with a punch than a roundhouse kick though but if a grappler tries to get you and you do a good fighting retreat, you could bloody up his face quite a bit before he gets a hold of you.
 

Andy Moynihan

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Andy, wish I could say I read your whole post, cos I know it's well-thought out and well worth the time, but just can't do it right now. But the portion I quoted is just classic. May have to steal it, copyright it, and sell it back to you...No, no, no, just kidding. :lfao: Sheesh....

Really, it's a stroke of brilliance in my book. :asian: Unfortunately, gotta 'spread the love' before I can rep ya for this.


Aw, what, nobody wants my shovel quote? ;) :D
 

Shidoshi0153

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A lot of good ideas and comments out there. This question has been posed ever since I have been in the martial arts, and I am sure its been around far longer than that.

I think you guys are on the money when you talk about no one system holding the key to success for everyone. It does depend on the practioner.

That said, I have always thought it to be somewhat naive to merely say striking is the way to go, or all fights end on the ground or whatnot. The bottom line is that conflict can involve any combination of strikes, chokes, throws, locks, ground fighting, weapons, etc. I think it is important to be knowledgable in all these areas. By studying all these areas, one not only becomes acclimated to all areas they may face, but they also have more choices to develop a strategy, box a wrestler, wrestle a boxer.

The downfall, if that is what you want to call it, of most "styles" is that they only take into account a small area of conflict, such as your striking arts, and beat it to death. Let's face it, judo is a wonderful art, but do you really need all those throws? The answer is of course not. Two or three will surely suffice.

So my advice, is instead of looking at any one particular style, look to become familiar with all areas of conflict. Combine this with good training methods, ie. lots of randori, and you'll be best prepared to face what may come your way.
 

thardey

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A lot of good ideas and comments out there. This question has been posed ever since I have been in the martial arts, and I am sure its been around far longer than that.

I think you guys are on the money when you talk about no one system holding the key to success for everyone. It does depend on the practioner.

That said, I have always thought it to be somewhat naive to merely say striking is the way to go, or all fights end on the ground or whatnot. The bottom line is that conflict can involve any combination of strikes, chokes, throws, locks, ground fighting, weapons, etc. I think it is important to be knowledgable in all these areas. By studying all these areas, one not only becomes acclimated to all areas they may face, but they also have more choices to develop a strategy, box a wrestler, wrestle a boxer.

The downfall, if that is what you want to call it, of most "styles" is that they only take into account a small area of conflict, such as your striking arts, and beat it to death. Let's face it, judo is a wonderful art, but do you really need all those throws? The answer is of course not. Two or three will surely suffice.

So my advice, is instead of looking at any one particular style, look to become familiar with all areas of conflict. Combine this with good training methods, ie. lots of randori, and you'll be best prepared to face what may come your way.

That's the foundation of my style, Chun Kuk Do, at 1st black, we are supposed to have "mastered the basics" - the gross motor skills, so to speak. We are expected to be able to do 5 hard blocks, 2 or 3 soft parries, a few hard strikes, a few kickboxing combinations, a couple of locks, and a couple of throws. That takes about 5 years. After that, you can start adding in slowly the other, more advanced techniques of each of those. Our goal is to master two or three options for each situation, no more. We start with the hard styles, and add in the softer styles as you get better.
 

Doc_Jude

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Or my instructor(Shotokan as well as other styles) who stood on one leg...the other ankle was broken in three places as well as dislocated and broke the boxer's ribs who had attacked him in the street with his knees strikes plus bust his face up. The attacker was an 18st ex army boxer.
Dude, who was that!?! Love that story, I'm gonna tell it tonight!
 

still learning

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Hello, It there such a thing as one martial art/fighing art, against the many different attacks on the street? It there such a thing as ALL attackers attack the same way?

False crack...one of the hardest to defend against....(could be a punch?, kick?,shove?, or combintions?

Most of us would try to defuse the situtions, avoid any physical confrontations, when possible.

If attack? ....One thing is? ..are you physcial fit to endure the lenght of the sitution? ...

Learnin where and when to strike? ...you can learn this in most of your martial art training. Comes only with practicing.

The MIND...to forcus..think...control your thoughts and fears...just as improtant in any martial art training.

Learn "getting hit" is important training too.

Want to learn how to fight? ...is to fight for real! fastest way to learn and gain experience.....BUT not always possible.

Talk to any combat army/marine soldier? ...ask if training the same as actual combat? .................Aloha
 

Tez3

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Dude, who was that!?! Love that story, I'm gonna tell it tonight!


He's my instructor. Our website is www.shotaikai.co.uk.

He's the scary looking one.

Still learning, have you read any of the posts? I'm asking because your questions have already been answered!
 

Kosho Gakkusei

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Motoki against boxers? Motoki he is a great martial artist (we do not know anything about the boxer.

Motoki?? Do you mean Choki Motubu?

The way the story goes...
In 1921 the Russian Heavyweight champ goes to Japan hosts an all takers bare-knuckle challenge match. At the time the 50 yr old Choki Motubu was just a spectator but after 4 or 5 Judoka were quickly defeated by the Boxer, Choki stepped into the ring. For the 1st 2 rounds Choki just avoided the Boxer's punches. In the 3rd round the 5' 4" tall Motubu delivered a low kick followed by a jumping one knuckle punch to the temple knocking out the Boxer. The victory was eventually attributed to Ginchin Funakoshi and ultimately led to Japanese interest in learning this Okinawan Kempo that was later called Karate. Some versions of the story also claim that the Boxer died 2 days later.


_Don Flatt
 

still learning

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Any two students? The pro MMA fighter students? The one that knocked a guy out with a flying knee to the head.........................on the street? That lad is Muay Thai trained by Thai instructors in Bangkok.Or the Wado Ryu instructor in his fifties who dropped two guys in the pub we were in when they tried to punch him? Or my instructor(Shotokan as well as other styles) who stood on one leg...the other ankle was broken in three places as well as dislocated and broke the boxer's ribs who had attacked him in the street with his knees strikes plus bust his face up. The attacker was an 18st ex army boxer.
We have a whole host of karateka who are very good at 'streetfighting', Geoff Thompson for a start. We have very good full contact karate fighting tradtion here! Extol boxings virtues by all means, there are many but don't ridicule karate when it's clear you know little about it.
It's not to everyones' taste but we are a fighting club, we can do everything a boxer can and a wee bit more lol!

Hello, Thank-you for your comments. I glad to hear you folks in England are better train.

The top karate's ( most can handle anybody). If you look at the way alot of karate school teach? Most do not have the same skills like a real boxer. The training for boxers is most intense and lots of full contact. There timing,movements are quicker.

Street figting? average Karate person vs average Boxer? ....I would put my money on the Boxer (street fights).

Remember anyone can win "any time", even those who do not train in any ARTS.

Just about everyone can swing there arms and legs, We humans were expose to fighting from the time we are born.

It just that here in Hawaii those who have come from boxing experience seems to have a better understanding in a REAL fight! and learning Karate!

Still learning.....still trying to figure things out....A well train Karate person will always be able to defend himself. I still believe there are better ways to learn, train, in a short period of time and simple techniques that will work for most people in a real fighting back situtions.

In the future ( maybe 50 years from now? ...learning figthing skills/defense skills) will change because they will find a faster,quicker way to learn (if we do not kill each other - NU-Clear arts of fighting).

Speed learning that teaches the mind and body to react! and remember it too! Martial arts should not be years of training to become proficient. Like learning to drive a standard car? ....to learn swiming? ....Maybe in the future the learning will change? .....I believe that! ....still learning and searching for a better way to learn fighting skills anyone can do in 6 months or less.....Aloha (basic training for a foot army soldier is less than 3 months and another 4-6 months of advance training) before they can go to WAR!

If you had to teach someone to fight back (someone without any martial arts) ....What would you teach him? w/o knowing the other person? In less than 3 months. Is it possible? Off course! .................Aloha (from a slow learner)
 

billybybose

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for self defence awarness is best.if you can see trouble coming skedadle.it makes life alot easier.if you have to fight its not so much the system or style its the fighters attitude.violance of action will get you home.extreme violance done quickly,and harshly to one can suck the will to fight out of even a pack of dudes
 

whitetiger2001

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To put it simply, the best style is the one that works for you. We all have our limitations, mine is with high kicks ebcause I lack the flexibility to thrown them with any real degree of precision or power, I rely on upper body strength and speed so for me, something like TKD wouldn't work too well. Also I'm not the best grappler in the world although I would like to fix that so I might in the future look at an art that covers that in more detail than my core art.
I prefer hybrid arts because they put more tools in the toolbox without having to spend years in of art or another. The best route wouyld be to study one that works and build on it from other arts but often times, time and money are deciding factors so many have to temper their desires because of practicality. Everyone had different reason for taking what they take, I'm no exception and although I'd like to continue and explore my MA training with other styles, time and money make it prohibitive for the moment.
I gues it comes down to this, take what works for you, use another style if you can to strength whatever weakness your core style has and absorb every bit of knowldeg you can from your instructors and fellow students.
 

jks9199

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Bump... highlighting threads on use of force.
 
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