My instructor trains us to be tense/rigid

rabbit

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I feel like my instructor is on a time schedule. Classes last 45 minutes. I get the impression he is trying to cram as much material into a class.(forms,weapons,sparring) He will get us to do all the color belt forms within 5-10 mintues. This does not teach me or an already tense student to relax. The forms feel way too intense. There is much confusion as to why we train like this. Is it for fitness? for self defense? or just showsmanship?

My instructor says my side kick techniques is incorrect. I think if my kick hits the target, with penetration, and good timing then it is a good sidekick. He always gets on my case about my sidekick. Is he trying to teach me showsmanship? It is good to do it correctly but is this only so I will do good at a tournament? Showing so much showmanship makes me feel like I am training to be in the Korean Military? My instructor even jokes about how he is training us to become his own personal "black belt" army.

Qigong and meditation is essential to understand the true roots of Taekwondo, but can the instructor really teach something with so much cultural baggage?

We had some Korean foreign exchange students sign up for class. I have never seen such talented martial artists. (TKD) They were 3rd degree. I doubt I would have that level of skill at 3rd degree. I can picture in my mind my instructors response. My instructor would say "It's becuase their 3rd degree" But is it really that their 3rd degree? or do they really practice taekwondo the way it should be practiced. With the Korean beliefs, the korean ideology, and korean culture.

Without saying too much about my own religious back round or my own ethnicity. I actually feel korean and I am not Korean or Asian.

I have learned a lot but now that I see what taekwondo really is I am disillusioned with my training and will no longer train at that studio or taekwondo. I am going to pursue bodybuilding.

Feedback is appraciated. Thank you
 

dancingalone

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I am not a fan of the 45 minute class myself. It's a result of the teacher wanting to teach an extra class each night in order to accomodate more students.

I do think it's a bit odd that you complain about your TKD forms practice being too tense and rigid, yet you're changing to body-building?

It sounds to me that TKD is not the problem. You and your instructor's teaching style and setup are just not a good fit for each other. I believe you can still stay within taekwondo and find what you are looking for - you just need to look around in perhaps a smaller school in a non-commercial setting.
 
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rabbit

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I am not a fan of the 45 minute class myself. It's a result of the teacher wanting to teach an extra class each night in order to accomodate more students.

I do think it's a bit odd that you complain about your TKD forms practice being too tense and rigid, yet you're changing to body-building?

It sounds to me that TKD is not the problem. You and your instructor's teaching style and setup are just not a good fit for each other. I believe you can still stay within taekwondo and find what you are looking for - you just need to look around in perhaps a smaller school in a non-commercial setting.


I like Taekwondo. I just don't like that he makes me feel like I am in control of my success. I take classes and I am not at the level I want to be at. He doesn't tell me anything about conditioning or how to practice outside of the studio. I think he is afraid to have someone that has more skill that him. I need someone to take me to my physical limits.

I didn't give up on taekwondo... I gave up on my instructor.
 

dancingalone

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I like Taekwondo. I just don't like that he makes me feel like I am in control of my success. I take classes and I am not at the level I want to be at. He doesn't tell me anything about conditioning or how to practice outside of the studio. I think he is afraid to have someone that has more skill that him. I need someone to take me to my physical limits.

I didn't give up on taekwondo... I gave up on my instructor.



Sounds like you've identified the problem then. I wish you luck on your hunt for a new instructor/coach/mentor. I myself have always thought one should train with the best teacher one can find, regardless of the martial art he teaches.
 

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How long have you been doing TKD? What is your current Kup? You state that he give you feedback about your technique but you don't feel that the feedback is warranted. You feel that if you technique hits the target with penetration and timing that it is good enough. But then you still complain that you are not getting what you feel you need. I am confused. You don't know, but you know.

Also TKD is Korean. This does not mean that you have to change your religious beliefs, but you should understand the culture of the art that you are learning.

Why are you taking TKD? To switch to body building seems to suggest that you simply want physical activity and nothing more. If that is the case then body building it is.
 
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rabbit

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How long have you been doing TKD? What is your current Kup? You state that he give you feedback about your technique but you don't feel that the feedback is warranted. You feel that if you technique hits the target with penetration and timing that it is good enough. But then you still complain that you are not getting what you feel you need. I am confused. You don't know, but you know.

Also TKD is Korean. This does not mean that you have to change your religious beliefs, but you should understand the culture of the art that you are learning.

Why are you taking TKD? To switch to body building seems to suggest that you simply want physical activity and nothing more. It that is the case then body building it is.

My instuctor tells me I have low self-worth. Thats why I started Taekwondo. To improve myself. At some point I decided I wanted to be the best I could be. It's simply not happening there. People tell me I'm talented and I don't take credit for it. Then they say I'm humble. I don't know if they are trying to boost my self-esteem or are telling the truth. I see a lot of people with more talent than me and I tell my instructor I want to be that good. He takes it out of context says "you'll never be that good." I think it is one of his beliefs is not to compare ourselves to other people. To only be the best that I am capable of. Which is unacceptable to me. I don't care what I "think" of myself. What I "think" of myself might change or it might not be realistic. I might get a little bit better but what good does it do for him to give a pat on the back and say I am good when In reality I am not that good. That is delusion of the worse kind. Thinking you have more worth than you really have. That doesn;t help anyone improve This goes to mediation. What is the "self"?

That studio is Sport Taekwondo. Which is ok but he has to admit it and let me persue it from that perspectice. Which would mean I am there to win. Not lose. When they get into life skills it makes me wonder. They ask "Who here has integrity?" (If the definition is telling the truth) Everyone raised their had but me. They told me to raise my hand and I did but only becuse I follow directions. I have thought a lot about what it means to have integrity and if it is "truth-telling" people need to think before they raise there hand. If someone asks something too personal I find a way around
the question. Don't think that becuse you ask I'm going to answer. But hey, thats ok. I can admit it. Thats just what I "think".

I need something more tangible in my life. Tournament wins or belt promotions. Landing that tornado kick. Do a back flip. I want to impress myself. I have something to prove to myself. Having something to prove is a mental aspect of training. I am there for purely physical reason.

I have a mental side too. I meditate, I practice qigong, and I studied the culture of the art I was learning. Somewhere in the midst of all that It all became integrated. In a way its all mental (psycological)

I understand taekwondo and the basics.
 

spinny

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It sounds to me like your instructor has a negative attitude.

You say "I don't care what I "think" of myself. What I "think" of myself might change or it might not be realistic."
But you sound like it matters to you what other people think "People tell me I'm talented and I don't take credit for it. Then they say I'm humble. I don't know if they are trying to boost my self-esteem or are telling the truth. I see a lot of people with more talent than me and I tell my instructor I want to be that good. He takes it out of context says "you'll never be that good."
If it's true that you don't care what you think about yourself, but you do care what others think, then your thinking is backwards if you are interested in self-improvement.

I completely disagree with your instructor about not comparing yourself to other people (if you're read his beliefs correctly). And I don't understand how someone teaching Sport TKD can think that making a comparison between people is what competition is all about.

Here's a new attitude for you to contemplate: Don't worry about if you'll ever be good, or a good as someone else. That won't get you anywhere. But you can tell yourself that you want to be better. And if you're going to think about someone being better, then make it your goal to be better than them.

I suggest that you write down your goals and what you're going to do to achieve them. Make little goals - like landing that tornado kick. And big goals - like earning your black belt, or becoming a Master. Everyone needs motivation, and meeting goals will fuel you.
 

Tez3

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My instuctor tells me I have low self-worth. Thats why I started Taekwondo. To improve myself. At some point I decided I wanted to be the best I could be. It's simply not happening there. People tell me I'm talented and I don't take credit for it. Then they say I'm humble. I don't know if they are trying to boost my self-esteem or are telling the truth. I see a lot of people with more talent than me and I tell my instructor I want to be that good. He takes it out of context says "you'll never be that good." I think it is one of his beliefs is not to compare ourselves to other people. To only be the best that I am capable of. Which is unacceptable to me. I don't care what I "think" of myself. What I "think" of myself might change or it might not be realistic. I might get a little bit better but what good does it do for him to give a pat on the back and say I am good when In reality I am not that good. That is delusion of the worse kind. Thinking you have more worth than you really have. That doesn;t help anyone improve This goes to mediation. What is the "self"?

That studio is Sport Taekwondo. Which is ok but he has to admit it and let me persue it from that perspectice. Which would mean I am there to win. Not lose. When they get into life skills it makes me wonder. They ask "Who here has integrity?" (If the definition is telling the truth) Everyone raised their had but me. They told me to raise my hand and I did but only becuse I follow directions. I have thought a lot about what it means to have integrity and if it is "truth-telling" people need to think before they raise there hand. If someone asks something too personal I find a way around
the question. Don't think that becuse you ask I'm going to answer. But hey, thats ok. I can admit it. Thats just what I "think".

I need something more tangible in my life. Tournament wins or belt promotions. Landing that tornado kick. Do a back flip. I want to impress myself. I have something to prove to myself. Having something to prove is a mental aspect of training. I am there for purely physical reason.

I have a mental side too. I meditate, I practice qigong, and I studied the culture of the art I was learning. Somewhere in the midst of all that It all became integrated. In a way its all mental (psycological)

I understand taekwondo and the basics.

By heck lad, thats a tangle and no mistake. I hope you find what you're looking for but I'm buggered if I know what it is.
 

terryl965

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Sounds like a Bad Instructor and a Bad student, which leads to the question why are both of you there?
 

Marginal

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I feel like my instructor is on a time schedule. Classes last 45 minutes. I get the impression he is trying to cram as much material into a class.(forms,weapons,sparring) He will get us to do all the color belt forms within 5-10 mintues. This does not teach me or an already tense student to relax. The forms feel way too intense. There is much confusion as to why we train like this. Is it for fitness? for self defense? or just showsmanship?
Sounds somewhat old school. Just pushing your through a workout.

In my experience, relaxation comes through practice and familiarity with the material. (Nothing increases the tension like someone constantly telling you to relax.) If you're not practicing outside of class (even if the instructor doesn't tell you to) getting to the point you can feel relaxed while going through the drills is not going to happen.

My instructor says my side kick techniques is incorrect. I think if my kick hits the target, with penetration, and good timing then it is a good sidekick. He always gets on my case about my sidekick. Is he trying to teach me showsmanship? It is good to do it correctly but is this only so I will do good at a tournament?

Dunno the dynamic here, but there are a lot of ways to get your foot to that target. Some are better than others. Hitting the target with penetration is good, but if you're not chambering, you'll end up ramming your foot into your opponent's guard well before you hit the target. You also run the risk of getting your kick jammed if you're not willing to put the effort into the proper setup. It's not all about kicking a pad.

Qigong and meditation is essential to understand the true roots of Taekwondo, but can the instructor really teach something with so much cultural baggage?
The instructor must empty his cup to teach you?

We had some Korean foreign exchange students sign up for class. I have never seen such talented martial artists. (TKD) They were 3rd degree. I doubt I would have that level of skill at 3rd degree.
You won't practice and won't pay attention to your technique. Dunno why you would either.

I can picture in my mind my instructors response. My instructor would say "It's becuase their 3rd degree" But is it really that their 3rd degree? or do they really practice taekwondo the way it should be practiced. With the Korean beliefs, the korean ideology, and korean culture.
So... They practice Tai Chi? Like you think you should be doing in a TKD class?

Without saying too much about my own religious back round or my own ethnicity. I actually feel korean and I am not Korean or Asian.
How does one feel Korean?
 
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rabbit

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It sounds to me like your instructor has a negative attitude.

You say "I don't care what I "think" of myself. What I "think" of myself might change or it might not be realistic."
But you sound like it matters to you what other people think "People tell me I'm talented and I don't take credit for it. Then they say I'm humble. I don't know if they are trying to boost my self-esteem or are telling the truth. I see a lot of people with more talent than me and I tell my instructor I want to be that good. He takes it out of context says "you'll never be that good."
If it's true that you don't care what you think about yourself, but you do care what others think, then your thinking is backwards if you are interested in self-improvement.

I completely disagree with your instructor about not comparing yourself to other people (if you're read his beliefs correctly). And I don't understand how someone teaching Sport TKD can think that making a comparison between people is what competition is all about.

Here's a new attitude for you to contemplate: Don't worry about if you'll ever be good, or a good as someone else. That won't get you anywhere. But you can tell yourself that you want to be better. And if you're going to think about someone being better, then make it your goal to be better than them.

I suggest that you write down your goals and what you're going to do to achieve them. Make little goals - like landing that tornado kick. And big goals - like earning your black belt, or becoming a Master. Everyone needs motivation, and meeting goals will fuel you.

Yeah, I am usually worried or nervous. Thats why I'm tense. Now that I don't train there I feel better about how I do taekwondo. I may or may not decide to pursue TKD. Maybe another sport would be better.
 

Dave Leverich

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Try Tai Chi, seriously you might love it. A lot more of the metaphysical type things there (depending on your sifu etc). You're looking for a lot in TKD that doesn't usually exist in TKD.
 
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rabbit

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Ok, Dave. I am going to try Tai Chi. I have had that in the back of my mind. I do expect to much from TKD. In a way I didn't know I was expecting too much. Sorry. Thanks for the input.

Actually today I wanted to practice Tai Chi this morning but I ended up practicing my ATA forms. I did it in a Tai Chi sort of way. I know its not tai chi.

Thanks. I needed somewhere to vent. Everyone I know wants to know why I quit. How much simpler it would have been to say "It's not fun" or "I don't like it anymore" but those response seem very shallow to me and I look for a deeper meaning.
 

Laurentkd

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I feel like my instructor is on a time schedule. Classes last 45 minutes. I get the impression he is trying to cram as much material into a class.(forms,weapons,sparring) He will get us to do all the color belt forms within 5-10 mintues. This does not teach me or an already tense student to relax. The forms feel way too intense. There is much confusion as to why we train like this. Is it for fitness? for self defense? or just showsmanship?

My instructor says my side kick techniques is incorrect. I think if my kick hits the target, with penetration, and good timing then it is a good sidekick. He always gets on my case about my sidekick. Is he trying to teach me showsmanship? It is good to do it correctly but is this only so I will do good at a tournament? Showing so much showmanship makes me feel like I am training to be in the Korean Military? My instructor even jokes about how he is training us to become his own personal "black belt" army.

Qigong and meditation is essential to understand the true roots of Taekwondo, but can the instructor really teach something with so much cultural baggage?

We had some Korean foreign exchange students sign up for class. I have never seen such talented martial artists. (TKD) They were 3rd degree. I doubt I would have that level of skill at 3rd degree. I can picture in my mind my instructors response. My instructor would say "It's becuase their 3rd degree" But is it really that their 3rd degree? or do they really practice taekwondo the way it should be practiced. With the Korean beliefs, the korean ideology, and korean culture.

Without saying too much about my own religious back round or my own ethnicity. I actually feel korean and I am not Korean or Asian.

I have learned a lot but now that I see what taekwondo really is I am disillusioned with my training and will no longer train at that studio or taekwondo. I am going to pursue bodybuilding.

Feedback is appraciated. Thank you


Your profile says you are the 3rd degree and an assistant instrutor. How long have you been studying TKD and what rank are you? I think that info would help people give you advice.
 

jks9199

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Until you stop looking outside for measures of success and achievement, you're going to have problems. In anything you do.

You question why your instructor is correcting your kick that has "good" penetration and is on target. Why are you willing to settle for "good"; is it possible that, if you tried what he's telling you, you would have "great" penetration?

My teacher used to tell as that as long as "you are willing to settle for good enough, that is all you'll ever be."
 

xfighter88

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I am not a fan of the 45 min classes either. It seems that there is just too much to cover in that span of time.

As far as the rest of your post....you complain that your instructor is too picky about your side kick but then you whine that he's not trying to make you a better martial artist. Which is it? It seems to me that you are frusterated that it takes time to get good. You want to be good right now without putting your time in. Good luck with body building because it takes discapline too, and guess what? Muscles don't show up over night.
 

ATC

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OK, I am just going to be blunt here. You need some counsiling or therapy. You are all over the place. I am not trying to be funny or mean or anything. Just giving some advice.
 
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rabbit

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I'm not a bad guy. I can say I am nice and candid. It's just when ownership changed the relationships there started going sour. Nothing personal against my instructor. I am just having a hard time letting go. Taekwondo was my life for a while.

Forget what I said about everything. This thread is getting crazy. It's insane. I am not that great at explaining things on a forum or on the computer. It's not like I do this all the time or have friendships with people on this site. You can't expect me to explain everything and make it sound justifiable.
 

Tez3

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I'm not a bad guy. I can say I am nice and candid. It's just when ownership changed the relationships there started going sour. Nothing personal against my instructor. I am just having a hard time letting go. Taekwondo was my life for a while.

Forget what I said about everything. This thread is getting crazy. It's insane. I am not that great at explaining things on a forum or on the computer. It's not like I do this all the time or have friendships with people on this site. You can't expect me to explain everything and make it sound justifiable.

I'm sure you are a nice guy and explaining things in the written word isn't the easiest thing to do.

Something has worried you enough to post up on here. If we can help we will.

I had to give up Wado Ryu which I loved when the club closed down, I took up Tang Soo Do instead which is a perfectly fine style but try as I might I can't love it the way I do Wado but it's not such a big deal, I enjoy martial arts and I have MMA as well which I didn't before so as one door shuts another opens.

If you can, put your main concern down, don't worry about the other bits, just what is worrying you the most and I promise we'll help where we can. sometimes talking to complete strangers is more helpful than friends.
 
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