Interesting Video. Aikido vs more realistic attacks...

JowGaWolf

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Those clean punches to his head were because he either used the wrong technique against the attack or because he didn't alter the attack. My guess is that if he keeps doing this type of training that he'll gain a deeper understanding of the technique and start making slight changes to the techniques to account for punches getting in like that. Techniques don't always unfold exactly how they do in drills. I would be interested in seeing how he addresses the hooks and uppercuts now that he has an idea of how and when they are getting in.
 

drop bear

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Those clean punches to his head were because he either used the wrong technique against the attack or because he didn't alter the attack. My guess is that if he keeps doing this type of training that he'll gain a deeper understanding of the technique and start making slight changes to the techniques to account for punches getting in like that. Techniques don't always unfold exactly how they do in drills. I would be interested in seeing how he addresses the hooks and uppercuts now that he has an idea of how and when they are getting in.

Clean punches to the head means hit training partner is doing his job properly.

Court loss.
 

TSDTexan

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Those clean punches to his head were because he either used the wrong technique against the attack or because he didn't alter the attack. My guess is that if he keeps doing this type of training that he'll gain a deeper understanding of the technique and start making slight changes to the techniques to account for punches getting in like that. Techniques don't always unfold exactly how they do in drills. I would be interested in seeing how he addresses the hooks and uppercuts now that he has an idea of how and when they are getting in.
IF only aikido were influenced with the wing chun centerline and 6 Gates theory....
 

drop bear

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And what a surprise not a single arm caught out of thin air. Straight in for body control. Underhooks waist grabs and head grabs.
 

JowGaWolf

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Clean punches to the head means hit training partner is doing his job properly.

Court loss.
yep, and some of those clean punches had the potential to be game enders (the one at 2:48 is a dangerous way to take a punch because of where the punch lands). I hope they keep it up
 

JowGaWolf

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And what a surprise not a single arm caught out of thin air. Straight in for body control. Underhooks waist grabs and head grabs.

In my opinion its better to "shave" punches and wrap punches which has the effect of slowing punches down enough to grap the arm.
 

Hanzou

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yep, and some of those clean punches had the potential to be game enders (the one at 2:48 is a dangerous way to take a punch because of where the punch lands). I hope they keep it up

I'd like to see them do this with a smaller person/woman versus a larger person. Perhaps even against one of the people in this video?

The gentleman doing the Aikido in the video is a fairly large man, and was in fact larger than his attacker. I'm curious if a smaller person could even pull off what he pulled off in the video without taking some serious damage from someone much larger.
 

TSDTexan

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I'd like to see them do this with a smaller person/woman versus a larger person. Perhaps even against one of the people in this video?

The gentleman doing the Aikido in the video is a fairly large man, and was in fact larger than his attacker. I'm curious if a smaller person could even pull off what he pulled off in the video without taking some serious damage from someone much larger.

Valid points.
Question:
What if a smaller man could pull off the same? What would that establish?
 

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It's quite curious to me that each time the Aikido guy gets him into a lock, he has to take a hit for it. Generally speaking each fight was the same:

1. Attacker punches, Aikido guy blocks successfully
2. Attacker punches with free hand, Aikido guy takes the hit (usually to the head)
3. While taking the punch from the attacker, the Aikido guy moves in for the hold, pinning his attacker down.

My question is, if they weren't wearing headgear, would the Aikido guy be able to pull off that same strategy, or would that punch to the head be enough to stop him before he got the attacker into the hold?
 

drop bear

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yep, and some of those clean punches had the potential to be game enders (the one at 2:48 is a dangerous way to take a punch because of where the punch lands). I hope they keep it up

Any martial artist at any level eats punches. Sometimes they are fight enders. You train with guys who are at an ability to land those punches because then you have honest feed back.
 

Hanzou

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Valid points.
Question:
What if a smaller man could pull off the same? What would that establish?

It would establish that those techniques could work without strength. Considering how large the Aikido practitioner was, it's completely possible that he was using his weight and strength to force many of those techniques.
 

Tony Dismukes

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It's quite curious to me that each time the Aikido guy gets him into a lock, he has to take a hit for it. Generally speaking each fight was the same:

1. Attacker punches, Aikido guy blocks successfully
2. Attacker punches with free hand, Aikido guy takes the hit (usually to the head)
3. While taking the punch from the attacker, the Aikido guy moves in for the hold, pinning his attacker down.

My question is, if they weren't wearing headgear, would the Aikido guy be able to pull off that same strategy, or would that punch to the head be enough to stop him before he got the attacker into the hold?
I counted 4 entries and he got hit on 2. So a 50% rate of success without getting hit. That's not terrible, but the times he did get hit the punches were much cleaner than desirable. He would benefit from learning to cover and roll better so that the punches which landed would be less likely to be fight enders.

That's what training is for, of course. Hopefully they keep doing this and he will get better and better.
 

Tony Dismukes

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It would establish that those techniques could work without strength. Considering how large the Aikido practitioner was, it's completely possible that he was using his weight and strength to force many of those techniques.
Based on personal experience and observation, I will say the techniques shown can work effectively against bigger, stronger opponents.

Whether this particular individual can make them work against bigger, stronger guys - that's another question. It comes down to relative skill levels. Beating a bigger, stronger opponent in the clinch takes really good technique which only comes from a lot of hours working against bigger guys. I very rarely see really big guys who don't use their size to some extent, even if they are skilled.
 

Hanzou

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Based on personal experience and observation, I will say the techniques shown can work effectively against bigger, stronger opponents.

Whether this particular individual can make them work against bigger, stronger guys - that's another question. It comes down to relative skill levels. Beating a bigger, stronger opponent in the clinch takes really good technique which only comes from a lot of hours working against bigger guys. I very rarely see really big guys who don't use their size to some extent, even if they are skilled.

Perhaps in isolation, but what about while they're getting hit in the face by said larger attacker? I simply would like to see how this stuff breaks down under significantly more pressure, and a larger size/strength difference.
 

Midnight-shadow

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I counted 4 entries and he got hit on 2. So a 50% rate of success without getting hit. That's not terrible, but the times he did get hit the punches were much cleaner than desirable. He would benefit from learning to cover and roll better so that the punches which landed would be less likely to be fight enders.

That's what training is for, of course. Hopefully they keep doing this and he will get better and better.

So instead of a straight knock-out punch it turns into a grazing blow?
 

wingchun100

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One of the greatest videos I have ever seen! I mean that sincerely. I love it because the guy is not using his art against someone else in his art. Also, he has no idea what his partner is going to throw...not like preset self-defense application drills. Wonderful job!
 

JowGaWolf

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It would establish that those techniques could work without strength. Considering how large the Aikido practitioner was, it's completely possible that he was using his weight and strength to force many of those techniques.
Not disagreeing with you just adding to what you stated.

Usually when you see that, it's because they are using the wrong technique against the wrong attack. If the technique is done properly at the right time, and against the right attack, then you shouldn't have to do any "forcing." An example would be the video of when I took my sparring partner down with one hand and everyone said that it looked too easy and thought that it was more of my sparring partner being clumsy and not the technique actually working. The only reason the technique made it look that way was because it was done at the points of maximum efficiency. Everything from start to finish was done correctly, at the right time, with the right movement,and the right force.

The concepts of many martial arts system is not to use force against force. When you jab at a person's face then all of his force and energy is going forward in a straight light. Force is not being sent left or to the right. Because of this it will take very little energy to move the fist left or right. You can redirect the punch with hard or soft techniques. This is the fundamental mechanics of martial arts regardless of the system.

If you see that someone is forcing a technique then they are either trying to apply the wrong technique to the situation or they are not applying the best technique to a situation. There are many things that can turn the "right" technique into the "wrong" technique. The most common is if you start a technique too early or too late, which often means the practitioner has missed the window of maximum efficiency and is forced to "muscle" the technique. The other common scenario is when you opponent keys in to what you are about to do and changes his or her actions, which in turns makes the initial technique the "wrong" technique. Fighting is fluid so all of these changes happen quickly and the slightest change can be the difference between "super easy technique", to "man I really had to work that technique."

The fact that someone muscles a technique or uses weight does not mean that the technique isn't valid.
 
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