The aikido thing

oftheherd1

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Perhaps in the context of your discussion these characterizations make sense but the way you describe the philosophy of Christianity is incorrect. The philosophy of Christianity as it pertains to other religions is the idea of having 'one God' as opposed to a 'pantheon' of Gods AND the idea that one should 'turn the other cheek' when facing transgression.

There are perhaps sects in Christianity that vehemently believe that all other Gods are fake but this is not a concept that is widely accepted by Christians. Not to turn your discussion to religion but essentially the concept you outlined for Christian philosophy was not a widely held belief.

@Kung Fu Wang I agree your statement of a philosophy of Christianity is incorrect.

@Yokazuna514, Well there are many religions that are loosely based on Christianity. But what would normally be accepted as main stream, would not say they believing in one God (which it does) is a philosophy so much as a tenant of faith.

Turning the other cheek was part of the Sermon on the Mount. There is debate on what is meant, is it a literal teaching or intended as an example of being willing not to be confrontational with evil or evil doers, and set a better example? But again, not a philosophy so much as a teaching of a better way to live.

And I know of no main stream, nor even many way out of the main stream religion that would accept that there are many gods that are not fake. I believe that would be anathema to Bible believing Christians.

Note that like you, I don't intend to turn this thread to a debate on Christianity, simply give my beliefs as you have given yours. Others can accept them or not, and I mean no argument with anyone else''s beliefs. We all get to make those choices of beliefs, just as some of us believe in ki and some don't. Ki isn't a religious belief, but it is one that is accepted on faith and by observed application (at least for me). I cannot prove it any more than anyone else can disprove it.
 

oftheherd1

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I've never found anything about blind faith in "empty the cup". It's more about taking the time to learn something before trying to alter or judge it. And that's important if you're trying to learn something. The purpose of a movement, drill, or instruction might not be immediately clear, and it might even seem stupid or "wrong" to someone with other information. So, if I go into a new style and start judging everything by what I already know - maybe deciding I already have a better technique than that - then I never get to learn anything well enough to find out how good it actually is (or isn't).

I agree. Until we try a new concept with an open mind, I don't think we are sufficiently knowledgeable to really say it isn't good. Maybe only for us, but without that "emptying of the cup," we may miss something that seemed utterly stupid at first, but turns out to be very useful in some if not all circumstances. Or of course, we may decide it isn't a good concept and we already know better; but we have the experience to justify saying that.
 

gpseymour

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I agree. Until we try a new concept with an open mind, I don't think we are sufficiently knowledgeable to really say it isn't good. Maybe only for us, but without that "emptying of the cup," we may miss something that seemed utterly stupid at first, but turns out to be very useful in some if not all circumstances. Or of course, we may decide it isn't a good concept and we already know better; but we have the experience to justify saying that.
Yep, that's what I was getting at. Mind you, I don't have an issue with someone who decides there's not enough evidence (for their use) to suggest something is worth learning. But once you decide to dig into something, often the only way to judge it well is to learn enough to make an informed decision. And you can't do that if you compare each new thing to what you know, to decide if what you know is better before you know how to do the new thing properly. In most cases, throws I already know will be much easier for me to apply than a new throw I learn. But if I put in the effort to learn the new throw well enough to get to application, it might become more useful than something I have now.
 

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