How long after training for pulse to return to normal?

Bill Mattocks

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Since I've been keeping track of my blood sugar and blood pressure lately, I have been noting my pulse rate; my BP meter automatically gives it to me.

I noticed that my average resting pulse rate is 80 (don't laugh, I'm working on it!). However, when I return from the dojo, my pulse seems to be about 110-118. The kicker is that I'm measuring it a half hour after my workout. Class ends at 9:30, I'm measuring at around 10 p.m. I even checked again an hour after that - it only dropped 10 bpm or so! Went to bed, woke up and it was back down to 77.

I find this a bit shocking! I was wondering how long after working out my pulse should return to normal. I can't seem to find any answers on the web, except that the longer it takes to come down, the more at risk I am for 'sudden death' and that the less time it takes, the better. Yay, great to know, but not what I'm looking for.

Anybody have any idea how long it should take in minutes for my pulse rate to come down after intense exercise?
 

jarrod

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i don't know anything about what the normal range is, but have you been cleared for martial arts training by your dr.? that's the kind of thing i would bring to his attention, honestly.

jf
 
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Bill Mattocks

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i don't know anything about what the normal range is, but have you been cleared for martial arts training by your dr.? that's the kind of thing i would bring to his attention, honestly.

jf

Yes, I have. I've been recently diagnosed with diabetes, have started taking medication, and he gave me permission to begin training again last week. I asked how hard and he said just go for it, as hard as I can handle.

I have a follow-up with him on June 22, and I will ask him, but I still was wondering how long it should take for a person's pulse to return to normal after a good two-hour or so workout.
 

elder999

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Yes, I have. I've been recently diagnosed with diabetes, have started taking medication, and he gave me permission to begin training again last week. I asked how hard and he said just go for it, as hard as I can handle.

I have a follow-up with him on June 22, and I will ask him, but I still was wondering how long it should take for a person's pulse to return to normal after a good two-hour or so workout.

Recovery time can vary. Remember, too, that while you've been cleared for exercise for you doctor, you are not fit. Recovery time is a measure of fitness: the shorter it is, the more fit you are.I'd expect it to improve as you continue to lose weight and get your diabetes under control. At our ages, it's a good idea to go ahead and get a cardiac workup-a stress test-you should probably talk with your doctor about this, since you're at risk:age, weight,and diabetes are all factors related to heart health. Like Jarrod said, talk to your doctor-as someone with lifelong health issues who has managed to keep them largely at bay:TALK TO YOUR DOCTOR.

Lastly, about numbers:it's easy to obsess on them. You have to take your blood sugar regularly; pay attention to that. Unless you feel poorly, ignore the heart rate. Ignore the weight, or only limit yourself to weighing once a week. I'd also recommend an increase in aerobic exercise, once you've talked to the doc: a brisk walk 3 times a week to start, like around 3 or 4 mph....
 
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Bill Mattocks

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I'd also recommend an increase in aerobic exercise, once you've talked to the doc: a brisk walk 3 times a week to start, like around 3 or 4 mph....

The dojo isn't aerobic exercise?
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I feel that I get a very good aerobic workout at my classes - we do full-on calisthenics for a good 20 to 30 minutes before even starting class, including jumping jacks, pushups, situps, crunches, stretches, jump rope, and breathing exercises. I'm usually soaked with sweat by the time we even begin doing kata or whatever we're working on that night.

However, I also joined a gym and I work out twice a week there in addition to my twice a week at the dojo. I walk one day a week - not much more room in my schedule! I've been doing the walking for over a year - I walk 2 to 3 miles at a time, as fast as I can force my legs to go without running, and I'm out of breath and soaked with sweat when I'm done (usually about 40 minutes).

I've had two weeks off since being diagnosed with diabetes, but really, I do a lot of CV and will do even more!
 

elder999

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The dojo isn't aerobic exercise?
icon10.gif

No. Generally, martial arts training is really anaerobic, with occasional spurts of aerobic exercise-though it sounds as though your warmups might do it-though calisthenics don't really count as "aerobic," per se. I'm talking about sustained aerobic exercise,though, within a target heart rate;for your age,probably between 90-150 bpm, though it might vary somewhat from that, due to your resting heart rate; you can get this info from any number of sources online, or a fitness trainer at your gym.

American Heart Association Target Heart Rates.
 

jks9199

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If you belong to a gym, there are probably some trainers there. Many trainers are happy to answer reasonable, brief questions without a formal (and expensive) session.
 
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Bill Mattocks

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If you belong to a gym, there are probably some trainers there. Many trainers are happy to answer reasonable, brief questions without a formal (and expensive) session.

Yeah, I'm sure normally, but it's a chain called Planet Fitness. Good equipment, place is clean, lots of room, and $10 a month with no contract (and they keep the bodybuilders out by not allowing loud noises) but no, no trainers, paid or otherwise. It's just a place to work out.
 

elder999

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Yeah, I'm sure normally, but it's a chain called Planet Fitness. Good equipment, place is clean, lots of room, and $10 a month with no contract (and they keep the bodybuilders out by not allowing loud noises) but no, no trainers, paid or otherwise. It's just a place to work out.


Lucky ****in' you!
 
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Bill Mattocks

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elder999

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Yeah, it works well for me. Both my dojo and my fitness club are less than a mile from my apartment. Dojo is $50 a month with no contract, fitness club is $10 also no contract. I got really lucky and I'm grateful!

http://www.hollowaysisshinryu.com/
http://www.planetfitness.com/

Looks like they have a Planet Fitness in ABQ.



Eh-when I'm in town, the lab has several gyms, and a marvelous wellness center (though lately they've been realy Nazis about the rules...)

When I'm not, there's Bally's. And I have a pretty good gym at home....actually, it's better than "pretty good."
 

jks9199

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Yeah, I'm sure normally, but it's a chain called Planet Fitness. Good equipment, place is clean, lots of room, and $10 a month with no contract (and they keep the bodybuilders out by not allowing loud noises) but no, no trainers, paid or otherwise. It's just a place to work out.
See if a college in the area has any sort of programs for sports trainers or sports medicine; they may have students doing some apprenticeship/practicums that can help.

Or... have you tried Google?
 
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Bill Mattocks

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See if a college in the area has any sort of programs for sports trainers or sports medicine; they may have students doing some apprenticeship/practicums that can help.

I'm guessing I can just ask my doctor if things have to go that far. It's a fairly simple question, I wasn't wanting to write a term paper on it.

Or... have you tried Google?
[/quote]

And read the responses BEFORE I posted. All I found were a lot of what I've gotten here - as I said in my first post - which say basically "Your pulse should return to normal after exercise" (duh) and "the longer it takes for your pulse to return to normal, the more at risk you are of sudden death" (yikes) and "the less time it takes, the better" (also duh).

So either nobody around the 'net knows what the average time might be, or nobody cares.

I'm just curious because I would have thought that even out-of-shape, my pulse would have returned to normal within a relatively short time after my workout, not still be elevated an hour later. But since all I'm getting is "go ask Mister Owl" ...
 

elder999

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I'm just curious because I would have thought that even out-of-shape, my pulse would have returned to normal within a relatively short time after my workout, not still be elevated an hour later. But since all I'm getting is "go ask Mister Owl" ...


At our age an hour later is not that unusual-in fact, it might be somewhat beneficial:increased heart rate=increased metabolic rate. On the other hand, hours later seems a little off to me.

Also, if it bugs you that much, you might try slowing it down with some breathing and relaxing-if you're successful at that, then you probably don't have much to worry about.....
 
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Bill Mattocks

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At our age an hour later is not that unusual-in fact, it might be somewhat beneficial:increased heart rate=increased metabolic rate. On the other hand, hours later seems a little off to me.

Thanks!

Last 'high' readings:

Thursday, June 11, 2009 10:22:00 PM Pulse 118
Thursday, June 11, 2009 11:38:00 PM Pulse 110
Monday, June 15, 2009 09:52:00 PM Pulse 110

On both evenings, I got done at the dojo at around 9:30 PM.

Tonight when I arrived home from work, my pulse was 69.

Also, if it bugs you that much, you might try slowing it down with some breathing and relaxing-if you're successful at that, then you probably don't have much to worry about.....

I don't know that it 'bugs' me, but it was surprising to me that my pulse stayed high that long after exercising, so I thought I'd try to find out what the 'normal' recovery rate is - in case something was unusual that I needed to be aware of. Instead, I found that no one apparently really knows how long it 'normally' takes. Just that more is bad, less is good. Yeah, I get that, but less than or more than WHAT?

I would never have known that my pulse rate stayed high for an hour or two after hard exercise if I hadn't been forced to start monitoring my BP (which, by the way, is a lovely 112/67), so that's how I noticed. I certainly don't feel winded, out of breath, etc, etc - in fact, I usually feel terrific after getting back from the dojo.

So that's all it is - just curiosity, which would turn to concern if I found out that an hour to recover a normal pulse rate is way too long. I'm not obsessing, just curious.

Thanks for the info!
 

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Could there be another factor keeping it elevated? For example, stressful travel, or stimulant beverages?
 
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Bill Mattocks

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Could there be another factor keeping it elevated? For example, stressful travel, or stimulant beverages?

Well, I drink coffee in the morning, but not during the day, and I've dropped all soda since being diagnosed with diabetes. All I drink are sugar-free powdered drinks and water now. I live about a mile from my dojo, and I'm about as blissed-out as I can be coming back from a good workout. I generally don't eat between lunch and later dinner after the dojo, so this measurement is taken when have just eaten dinner (late).

My drive from work is the same every day, not too stressful even if it is long, and for example tonight, I got back and measured my pulse right after climbing to the third floor where my apartment is - pulse 67. And my blood pressure is great all the time.

So I don't think I'm stressed-out, and definitely not caffeinated, etc.

I noticed that my pulse rate isn't elevated after getting back from lifting weights at the gym, but that's not something that gets me breathing hard. I really get an intense workout at the dojo - huffing and puffing and sweating like crazy the whole time. Sensei puts us through our paces.
 

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I do cardio exercise with a heart rate monitor. I've noticed that my breathing technique can influence my heart rate. Taking deep breaths from the bottom to the top of my lungs, holding for a few seconds (if possible) and forcfully expelling the air will reduce my heart rate by as much as 5 BPM within ~30 seconds. I wonder if using a similar breathing technique would influence your BPM.
 

Phoenix44

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At our age an hour later is not that unusual


HEHEHEHEHE...at OUR age. I love that. Listen, I'm also our age. Outside martial arts I do primarily weight training, plus a little interval training, and I use a heart rate monitor. It never takes more than a minute or two for my heart rate to drop below 100, and it's back to "normal" within five minutes.

From what I've read, if your heart rate takes a long time to return to normal, then there's a good chance you're training too hard for your current level of fitness.

Bottom line? I'd discuss it with your doctor, because s/he is familiar with your individual situation, treatment, etc. That may be your normal.
 

elder999

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HEHEHEHEHE...at OUR age. I love that. Listen, I'm also our age. Outside martial arts I do primarily weight training, plus a little interval training, and I use a heart rate monitor. It never takes more than a minute or two for my heart rate to drop below 100, and it's back to "normal" within five minutes.

Which is pretty much what I initially emphasized-I guess I should have said "At our age if you're overweight and suffering from other health issues an hour probably isn't out of line." The goal, of course, is to lower it.

An "athlete"'s recovery time is somewhere above 25 bpm, and normal is between 15 and 25. 12 or less and there's reason for concern, but Bill's already got enough concerns.....
 
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