Fighting multiple apponets

Kartate_student7

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My instructors are preparing me for my brown belt test and I have been fighting like 2-3 apponets at a time, and I'm not doing bad but I keep getting cornord any advice?
 

K-man

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My instructors are preparing me for my brown belt test and I have been fighting like 2-3 apponets at a time, and I'm not doing bad but I keep getting cornord any advice?
Keep moving, keep relaxed, try to keep one between you and the others, don't get tied up fighting one person. Nothing to it that 10 years training won't fix. :D
 

drop bear

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Ok ultimately they are trying to keep you between them. And you are trying to split off and fight from one side. Normally from what I have seen is people back off and then circle and get trapped between both guys and then bashed.

You are going to have to engage and then circle off from inside range. Forcing them to cut greater angles in their attempt to sandwich you.

You cant out manoeuvre 2 guys at a distance. Imagine they are the center of a circle to go around that center takes more time and distance. The further away from the center the more distance you have to travel.
 

oftheherd1

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If the situation allows, or more importantly if you can engineer it, fake an attack to one, allowing another to move in to attack, but actually attack that person yourself. Sparring 2 or 3 people is a little unrealistic in that your opponents never get hurt or taken out of action, even for a few moments. So you really have to be on your P's and Q's. But that is what your instructor and ultimately, those testing you want to see if you can do.

Good luck.
 

Blaze Dragon

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one method is to always move to the attacker on the outside, as they separate, move away towards that person. It forces them into a line. If you can get them in each others way they work against each other. I find these drills to be mostly for your endurance, but also to make you think quick on your feet. My last instructor, when he drilled with us and we all took turns, he would throw us into each other if he got a hold of us. We would constantly be trying to reposition ourselves to find an opening.
 
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Shai Hulud

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Keep moving. Don't let them box you into a corner or flank you from all ends. Where possible, keep one of them between you and the rest of the lot. Keeps them from jumping you.
 

Blaze Dragon

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Sometimes shooting between them can throw them off. I found staying on one guy is help because if you get distance they position themselves. If you stay on one guy and only switch to the closest, then shoot between them when they are trying to out flank you by going around you throw them off and cause the other guys to have to work extra hard. Look for the shortest distance you can move to keep everyone off you but one guy.
 

Langenschwert

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Lots and lots of running. The idea is to keep the guy you're fighting between yourself and everyone else. You can prepare your cardio for this by running/jogging at a moderate pace for 30 seconds and then sprint for say a 10 count. Do this for about 15 minutes if you can. It will also help if you run on the balls of your feet like a barefoot runner. This trains you to stay on your toes, which helps your explosivity and mobility, both of which are vital when fighting, doubly so when outnumbered.
 

RTKDCMB

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Keep moving, grow eyes in the back of your head and keep one in front of the other at all times. Do not spend too much time on one opponent by ignoring the other one. Keep the least skilled, least experienced, slowest or smallest between the other one. A larger opponent will use more energy trying to get around their smaller partner. If you are sparring continuously and facing a line of potential opponents that swap out regularly try to keep as far away from the line as possible, this will make them use more enrgey getting to you and you will have more time to determine where they will initially position themselves.
 

tshadowchaser

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actually being in the corner is not bad at times, it will prevent them from getting be hide you . It limits the attacks that can be used against you and makes your opponents come closer together to attack you which may limit what attacks they use. When you leave that corner you are able to place both or all your opponents at a disadvantage by placing one of them in front of the others.
It is a fun exercise and one that always seems to open up new ideas on how to defend yourself​
 

Transk53

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Good idea to use deflection, if that has not already been alluded to. Grab and pull, push offline sort of thing.
 

sinthetik_mistik

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Footwork, footwork, footwork.
Work against one at a time and do your best to keep them stacked in front of you. Use one against the other; Keep Moving!
yes, i totally agree with this. i'm no expert, but I think becoming an expert in sidestepping is crucial to defending against multiple attacks. my Taekwondo instructor told me to try to kick him, and by the time I had extended my leg, he had moved 4-5 feet to the side. Just keep sidestepping, keep moving, and move as quickly as possible!
 

Sapphire

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You can always practice being cornered to develop better reactions once you are cornered. Just a thought, because my instructor has had us stick our rear heel to the corner, and have our drill partner "let loose" on us for 60 seconds, just so we can develop quick defensive reactions, in the event that you're cornered in real life.
 

Mephisto

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Your back to a wall can help, it seems more beneficial with more than two opponents. For a large group of opponents a corner is okay too, you'll still take a beating but it clusters your opponents together and limits the number of guys that can attack. You can also use ropes or the wall to prevent takedowns. Foot work is very important and head movement helps a lot. At my boxing gym we do birthday beat downs, it's a blast. Typically you fight 5-10 boxers and MMA guys for two mins, the attackers use light contact and the defender goes full power. It's a blast :)
 

Jake104

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I actually have experience with this multiple times. Once It happened in front of a friends house. Two against me. What I did was attacked the closest guy after he sucker punched me. I took the hit. Then I hit and tried to use him as a shield. It worked for a bit. Which gave me time to make a bolt for my buddy's door bell to get help. I got to the porch and went to ring bell. Problem was as they were chasing me the momentum put my buttocks through his front house window breaking it. That got my buddy's attention and the thugs ran off jump in car.

Other times I either got beat down really bad or I got jumped and friends came to my rescue and we turned the tables and put down a good beat down. So nothing technical about those situations.

The previous I mention was tactical. I used what I trained in class and that was pick a guy beat him while using him as a shield. Get out of the middle. Whether it's a circle or a guy in front and back or both side by side. In my instance they were kind of in a side by side facing me configuration.
 

Jake104

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Oops I didn't read whole thread I thought we were talking real life not belt testing. Sorry. Might still help on test. Just control guy you are using as shield. Use good footwork and move a lot.
 
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