Embroidered Black Belts

rlobrecht

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It's been almost a year since we earned our 1st Dan, but we finally got our embroidered black belts.

For those that speak Korean, does the hangul look ok?

photo+_1_.JPG
 

Manny

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Ahhhh the smell of a brand new embroided black belt!!!! Nice bets BTW what brand are and who embroided them? I am not a big fan of full big thick embroided belts but the work done on your is very nice.

Manny
 
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rlobrecht

rlobrecht

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Ahhhh the smell of a brand new embroided black belt!!!! Nice bets BTW what brand are and who embroided them? I am not a big fan of full big thick embroided belts but the work done on your is very nice.

Manny

The belts are Sun Pro brand from Choi Brothers. I'm not sure if they are who embroidered them, but I assume so. I could check with my Sabumnim if you wanted to order from them. I know that Choi Brothers is wholesale only.
 

puunui

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Looks like a computer did the embroidery.
 

Grenadier

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It's been almost a year since we earned our 1st Dan, but we finally got our embroidered black belts.

For those that speak Korean, does the hangul look ok?

It's pretty close, although it's a bit off.

For the first one, phonetically, it would sound like:

Toh-reh-ee Loh-beu-reh-teu

The "beu" would actually sound like how the Germans would pronounce "b繹"

The second one, phonetically, would sound like:

Reek Loh-beu-reh-teu

If I were writing the Hangul, I would have put a "ㄱ" or "ㅋ" as the batchim (bottom consonant) of the "레" area, simply for the sake of phonetics. Whether or not this would be translationally correct is a separate matter. ;)
 

puunui

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If I were writing the Hangul, I would have put a "ㄱ" or "ㅋ" as the batchim (bottom consonant) of the "레" area, simply for the sake of phonetics. Whether or not this would be translationally correct is a separate matter. ;)

Wouldn't that make it phonetically a g sound more so than a k sound, rig instead of rik?
 

Grenadier

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Wouldn't that make it phonetically a g sound more so than a k sound, rig instead of rik?

Indeed, yes, but when they speak in real time, to be able to tell the difference between a gee-yuk versus a kee-yuk is somewhat difficult, even for natives, just as how we have the hard "c" in English versus the "k." Or, as the Japanese would put it, the spelling of kata Enpi / Empi or the title Sempai / Senpai is essentially the same.

The other thing is, that when you look at the most common name in Korean, namely "Kim," it's spelled with a gee-yuk "ㄱ," and not the kee-yuk "ㅋ."

Since the sole purpose is for phonetics, it really shouldn't matter, since trying to get the actual authentic name in Korean would necessitate using a true Korean name, instead of using phonetic guesses. I've known a German fellow with the name of Kristoph, whose belt actually read "Chee Ong" in Hangul after his last name.
 

Jaeimseu

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It's pretty close, although it's a bit off.

For the first one, phonetically, it would sound like:

Toh-reh-ee Loh-beu-reh-teu

The "beu" would actually sound like how the Germans would pronounce "b繹"

The second one, phonetically, would sound like:

Reek Loh-beu-reh-teu

If I were writing the Hangul, I would have put a "ㄱ" or "ㅋ" as the batchim (bottom consonant) of the "레" area, simply for the sake of phonetics. Whether or not this would be translationally correct is a separate matter. ;)

I believe the first one says "teu-reh-ee" (트레이), it just appears a bit like "toh-reh-ee"(토레이) because of the stitching connecting the ㅌ to the ㅡ. If you look at the stitching in 로 the vertical line in ㅗ is thicker. You can see the same thing in the final syllable in the last name on both belts.
 

puunui

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Indeed, yes, but when they speak in real time, to be able to tell the difference between a gee-yuk versus a kee-yuk is somewhat difficult, even for natives, just as how we have the hard "c" in English versus the "k." Or, as the Japanese would put it, the spelling of kata Enpi / Empi or the title Sempai / Senpai is essentially the same.

Sempai and Empi are a little different from Rick though, since the n and p are next to each other in a single word, whereas rick is just rick. What if his instructor writes his first name on his dobok, which a lot of instructors do? Would it be pronounced Rick or Rig in that context if we spelled it like how you suggest?

Since the sole purpose is for phonetics, it really shouldn't matter, since trying to get the actual authentic name in Korean would necessitate using a true Korean name, instead of using phonetic guesses. I've known a German fellow with the name of Kristoph, whose belt actually read "Chee Ong" in Hangul after his last name.

Not sure what the point of that was, but yes it is phonetic. So shouldn't be written as it is written on his belt?
 

Carol

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Personally I tend to view this sort of thing as personal taste/preference...because I have a difficult name to pronounce. When I was working with a large Japanese telecom company way back when, my business cards and e-mail always displayed both English and Japanese katakana characters,

My surname is not a problem for most Japanese speakers to pronounce, But when abroad, I found my first name was extremely awkward for my hosts. As a result, I dropped the last character, changing it from カロル (ka-ro-ru) to カロ (ka-ro). Not only was "karo" easier for the Japanese folks to pronounce, when spoken, the name "karo" sounds much closer to "Carol" than "karoru" does. This was a win-win.
 

miguksaram

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It's pretty close, although it's a bit off.

For the first one, phonetically, it would sound like:

Toh-reh-ee Loh-beu-reh-teu
I think it is phonetically the first one would be Tuh-rae-ee. While it looks like the vowel 'O' it really is just a stitching mark from going from the first letter to the next.

As for the last name is the 'ECH' silent in your last name? If so then it looks fine.
 
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