Chi-Sau from lineage to lineage....

guy b.

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If you use your right foot to step behind his right knee joint, that will really kill his knee.

It is generally a training stance in VT. It usually isn't the plan to stand like that when fighting.
 

LFJ

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...was it one of Kenneth Chung's people? From what I can tell he made some...err...changes since the 1970's.

Yes. I guess that is a bit of a relief, but I still have no idea what LS might have actually taught then.

I think it's fair to say that Ng Wah Sum's and Eddie Chong's early (hell, even present) stuff is more representative of what Leung Sheung actually taught than whatever Ken teaches now.

Don't know anything about NWS, but is this the same EC in this video?

I saw that a few years ago and skipped through parts of it. Saw him explaining the double faak-sau in SNT as finger strikes to the eyes of two guys coming up from your sides, and some other funny things. That's when I stopped watching.

I'm hoping that was just nonsense for the video? WSL did a tutorial video that has intentional errors and some stupid stuff put it in too, but nothing that obvious.
 

Marnetmar

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I'd assume so seeing as I was never taught something like that and he also leans back a bit, etc. in those videos.

The "strike the guy on the left, strike the guy on the right" thing in SLT makes it pretty obvious as well.
 

Juany118

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Regardless of the specifics of Chi-Sau, I think it's success starts with the attitude of the Novice. I see a lot of people new to Chi-Sau take what I think is the wrong attitude. The guy across from them gives em a wack. You can literally see the facial expression change, now it's about wacking back. They do and it becomes a loop. Now that is where you should be eventually but as a new person to the Chi-Sau imo your first thought shouldn't be "I need to wack em back", it can't be about ego, your first thought should be "hmmm what did I do wrong there?" If that means not taking an opening so you can more closely watch what you are doing wrong (in the event you repeat the mistake) it will help you in the long run.
 

Marnetmar

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Regardless of the specifics of Chi-Sau, I think it's success starts with the attitude of the Novice. I see a lot of people new to Chi-Sau take what I think is the wrong attitude. The guy across from them gives em a wack. You can literally see the facial expression change, now it's about wacking back. They do and it becomes a loop. Now that is where you should be eventually but as a new person to the Chi-Sau imo your first thought shouldn't be "I need to wack em back", it can't be about ego, your first thought should be "hmmm what did I do wrong there?" If that means not taking an opening so you can more closely watch what you are doing wrong (in the event you repeat the mistake) it will help you in the long run.

To add to this, it's bad training for both partners.

99% of the time, if you're just trying to tag the other guy, you're not actually doing anything that could possibly hurt an attacker because the proper opportunity to land a blow hasn't actually arisen yet. And it just provides a bunch of unnecessary frustration for the other partner, especially if he's new and has no clue what's even going on.

At certain times it has its place to show somebody where their openings are, but if both partners are playing that same game then it stops being a learning experience and just becomes useless.
 
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KPM

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^^^^^ Exactly! I see Wing Chun as being about "controlling while hitting." If you are playing Chi Sau and are hitting without having established a position of good control, then you are defeating the purpose of practicing Chi Sau.
 
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