Can someone be a good surgeon and a good MAist at the same time?

geezer

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Wow! You guys are amazing! Thank you all for the replies. They mean a lot. You've changed my view completely. I'm going to start from today. *does jig*

Good decision dude. My dad and my uncle were both surgeons. My Dad has been a fanatical snow-skier all his life and still skis black diamonds at age 85. Sure there will be times when you may have to put your second passion on "hold" for a while, but in the long run it will keep you fit and sane.

Me, well I'm a bit more laid back. I'm an art teacher. But when i've had an especially tough day dealing with the 100 or so students I teach every day, a little time doing forms or just hitting the bag really lets me get centered again.

Lastly, both the specialist who replaced my ACL and my regular doctor spent some serious time doing martial arts. When we talked about it, they both told me that they really valued the time they spent in MA. It also meant that they have had more insight into my physical issues... and has been very helpful to me.
 

jks9199

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I know a dentist who is a very skilled martial artist. I bring this up simply because it meant that he shaped some of his training to using different techniques and empty hand weapons...

Let me make a suggestion that's different from what I'm seeing here: You're 17. Continue to keep your sights on both goals -- but be open to change and flow in your life. When I turned 17, I was sure I was going to go to college, serve in the military (initially Air Force, later Marine Corps, then Navy...) and become an astronaut. Then it became a civil engineer, which is what I started college studying. And I was studying Bando "until I could learn ninjutsu." (Yes, I had all the Steven Hayes books. Even Ashida Kim's...) Various steps along the way, and I became a cop. And a black belt in Bando -- with a general interest in the various ninpo/ninjutsu/Bujinkan/et al arts.

So, what am I saying? Keep focused on doing your best in all you do, and be open to the flow of your life. And, yes, you can become both a surgeon and a skilled martial artist.
 

kungfu penguin

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my master tells of one guy in the san diego area i believe is as strong as an ox a great martial artist and one of the leading surgeons in the country sorry cant remember name of the guy though
 

Supra Vijai

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lol did he get his degree on the back of a matchbook one of the best things other than my meds which helps my depression which is a mood disorder is my Shotokan. Doing exercise works.

I think what was implied was that there is no such as too much exercise for people with mood disorders rather than "you have a mental health issue, you aren't allowed to do exercise" (?) At least that's how I see it, could be completely off though lol

Oh Narges, good luck with Med School! I'm doing a criminology degree myself and I ended up picking all forensics based electives for my minor sequence. The way I see it, things like Anatomy, Physiology, Cognitive Psychology, Trauma etc are all things I can learn and apply to my MA training. I mean if I know exactly how my opponent's body is built and how their mind works, it must surely become easier to find ways to break it right? ;)
 

Flea

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Supra Vijai, you are correct. :asian:

After The Good Doctor gace his presentation, I approached him and asked him about my exercise routine. At the time I was doing 4.5 hours of MA a week, another 2-3 aerobics classes, commuting by bike, and walking the dog 3-4 times a day. He amended his statement to "A mood disorder will respond well to all the exercise you choose to do, until your body gives you signals that you're overdoing it." :lol:

Now that I've sold the car, I expect to put that to the test immediately.
 

IcemanSK

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II can only echo the words of many of the folks here & add my own experience. I trained through college & grad school & I'm so grateful to have taken the time to do so.

As has been said previously expense & the type of MA in in which one trains in college are important factors. A campus club would probably be the best bet to keep down expenses. And joint locks & manipulations is probably something to stay away from if a career as a surgeon is the goal (unless you are looking for a "hands-on" education that is taught in a way that ed school doesn't.

All my best to you!
 

Supra Vijai

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Supra Vijai, you are correct. :asian:

After The Good Doctor gace his presentation, I approached him and asked him about my exercise routine. At the time I was doing 4.5 hours of MA a week, another 2-3 aerobics classes, commuting by bike, and walking the dog 3-4 times a day. He amended his statement to "A mood disorder will respond well to all the exercise you choose to do, until your body gives you signals that you're overdoing it." :lol:

Now that I've sold the car, I expect to put that to the test immediately.

Hey at least you'll be fit beyond belief! Good luck with the exercise and try not to over do it, stay healthy so you can keep training :) Mind you fitness is the next thing on my to do list for this year, have managed to cross off the first 2 already so making good progress but I tried a 5 minute "warm up" yesterday and almost died. A program called cage fitness designed to get you fit enough to last 6 x 5 minute rounds in an MMA ring.
 

billc

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There is or was a show on one of the cable networks about beverly hills plastic surgeons. One of the surgeons was a martial arts fan, and each episode he would do something pertaining to his hobby. So anything is possible, but prioritize the studying part. Martial arts will be there after you become a surgeon, but being a surgeon takes a lot of hard work.
 

Fuzzy Foot

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Of course one of the affirmations if you will, of MA is never say you can't. It may be hard but what you ask can be done. Keep in mind being a surgeon is a wonderful thing but don't forget to have a life in the meantime within the constraints of the priorities taking place in your life at the time. When you get to med school, and I'm sure you will, make some time, it may be 10minutes here, 20 minutes there, an hour or two a couple times a week etc. I used to take a 20 minute break from studying and do some stretches and a couple forms to break the tension and keep the blood flowing. Exercise is not just desirable, its required for maintaining brain function. It's already been proven.That said I know a few Dr./MA people including an ER doc that does Brazillian Jiu-Jitsu and an orthopedic surgeon who is an aikido guy, a veterinarian who teaches tai-chi. Study hard find some time for some MA and the rest will take care of itself. Oh and don't let anyone tell you, you can't.
 

Kacey

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I work out with a woman who is finishing her BA and applying for medical school - her opinion is that the TKD workouts keep her sane and balanced, and force her to put her books down occasionally; she credits it with helping her get through and is planning to continue through medical school.

If you're worried about damaging your hands, I have a TKD friend who is a dentist (actually, he's my dentist!) and the only thing he doesn't do is hand breaks. When he tests, his hand break requirements are replaced with additional foot breaks. He started TKD in college, and kept it up through military service, medical school, and parenthood (it helps that his wife is in TKD too).
 

goldwarrior

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I know of several Doctors and Surgeons who train in Martial Arts. They make time for it, because it keeps them sane and keeps the physically active. (You can't tell your patients to work our more if you don't!) You'll probably find your Karate studies will help you keep disciplined and focused in studying to be a surgeon.
 

chinto

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ok, there is no conflict in training in martial arts and medicine. I know several Medics and Doctors and nurses who study martial arts...

Now remember that if you are a medic of any type you are bound to DO NO HARM as part of your profession as a Medic, Nurse of Doctor...That means that if a patent comes to you you may do no harm!!

This does NOT prevent you from training or defending yourself from an attacker! so train hard and well and study hard as well.
 

CoryKS

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Put it this way... there's NO WAY martial arts can take up more time than golf. :rofl:
 

Mark Jordan

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I just read an article about a study that concluded exercise makes you smarter.

I read that too. Exercise boost your brain power because it helps improves circulation. Due to the increase blood flow the brain cells become resilient and more ready to link up. So it's true what's good for the heart is also good for the mind.
 

ETinCYQX

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I know what you're going through and it sucks. I'm an engineering student and I have a few decisions to make, but it's financial priorities with me. I'm fairly lucky when it comes to my parent's financial situation but I'm a bit stubborn and would like to pay for things myself.

There is one thing you have to consider though: your hands are your source of income. Depending on which MA you choose, you have to watch what happens to your hands, arms and joints. I'ts rather hard to operate with broken knuckles or a broken elbow.

This would be my main concern although the worst hand injuries seem to happen in grappling classes in the Gi, believe it or not. I've known more than one dentist who quit Judo/Jiu Jitsu or similar and became a striker to save his fingers. Don't know what style of Karate you study or how much grappling is involved but almost nothing short of rolling every class would concern me as far as small-motor injuries go. The big thing is heavy Gi's IMO.

Forgot to mention, I'm a guitar player so I do pay attention to my fingers.
 
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