Why are most martial arts weapons illegal?

Bill Mattocks

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but with a weapon that can as easily bite you in the butt as that one it matters. Maybe I am projecting here but I remember when I tried to "go fast" before my time with baston in my Kali training. I wacked my "funny bone" more than once doing sinawali in that time period.

edit: I am also looking at the weapon as being an Asian variation of the European flail which we know was a practical combat weapon. Here is a video with some light sparring involving a type of European flail. If I remember rightly (someone correct me if I am wrong) this would be considered a "peasant" flail.

You said you wanted a weapon you could carry. I don't see that here. You said you were interested in locks not striking, but you've posted only videos of striking.

What exactly are you seeking?
 

Juany118

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You said you wanted a weapon you could carry. I don't see that here. You said you were interested in locks not striking, but you've posted only videos of striking.

What exactly are you seeking?
I was only responding, with the 3 section staff, to @Charlemagne mentioning it. For me personally, you are of course correct.
 

Bill Mattocks

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I was only responding, with the 3 section staff, to @Charlemagne mentioning it. For me personally, you are of course correct.

In that case, might I suggest rope?

I was introduced recently to the self-defense aspects of the sarong. Whilst most of us don't wear sarongs these days, one could substitute a shirt, towel, or rope.

I was actually spending some time after the seminar I attended thinking about how I might apply what I had learned using a dog leash, a belt, or a camera strap.

Those are improvised weapons which I doubt anyone would object to you carrying (depending on circumstances) and which could be used to trap, lock, choke, immobilize, etc.
 

Juany118

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In that case, might I suggest rope?

I was introduced recently to the self-defense aspects of the sarong. Whilst most of us don't wear sarongs these days, one could substitute a shirt, towel, or rope.

I was actually spending some time after the seminar I attended thinking about how I might apply what I had learned using a dog leash, a belt, or a camera strap.

Those are improvised weapons which I doubt anyone would object to you carrying (depending on circumstances) and which could be used to trap, lock, choke, immobilize, etc.
Agreed. I actually noted using a belt in a previous response. I actually have used a belt, once, when off duty to assist another officer when I stumbled upon his car stop that went sideways. Somehow his cuffs went flying so it was belt time.
 

lklawson

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I was thinking of getting in to some of the weapons form and I wanted to learn something that I can actually carry. The problem I have found is that a lot of states(military, I move around a lot) have made laws that prevent you from carrying most weapons. A stick is often lumped in with a blackjack and is often only allowed to be carried by Police(baton). Knives seem to be the least restricted from what I have seen, but I would prefer to bind or lock someone over cutting them. Even a Kubaton is often outlawed under a fist pack in a lot of places. So are there any weapons forms that can be used most places?
Why?

Because this: Fear, uncertainty and doubt - Wikipedia
 

Tez3

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The three section staff is probably the most dangerous weapon to use for the unexperienced. On the other hand it's probably the most amusing weapon to watch the unexperienced use as long as you are out of the way when they throw it after they realise that twirling it around was the easy bit, stopping it not so much. :)
 

JowGaWolf

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LOL I was trying to be polite, but now imagine some with this skill using the same concepts in a real fight.

The principles are sound, it's just the amount of training necessary is impractical for your average real world martial artist (meaning one who needs a "day job" ;) )
This is one of the skills that a person could just do 3 or 4 pieces from the form to make someone think twice about trying to fight you that day. The good thing is that you can train with honest effort and learn how to use the 3 section staff to a point where you can actually use it to defend yourself. While it may not look as smooth as in the video, it will still be more than enough to use in self defense.
 

Flying Crane

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I wonder what real advantage the three-section staff has. It is recognized as being difficult to learn and prone to cause injury along the way. So there must be some advantage that it holds, to make it worth the trouble. Just what that is, I don't know.

Concealability? I don't think so, the segments are pretty long, much much bigger than nunchaku, for example.
 

Juany118

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I wonder what real advantage the three-section staff has. It is recognized as being difficult to learn and prone to cause injury along the way. So there must be some advantage that it holds, to make it worth the trouble. Just what that is, I don't know.

Concealability? I don't think so, the segments are pretty long, much much bigger than nunchaku, for example.
I think it's two fold. First though let me say I see it in the context of a battle field weapon. So what do we have.

1. a weapon that can be used a kin to having a baston in either hand.
2. A weapon that can be used to trap/wrap.
3. A weapon that can also be used with expanding ranges, close as in #1. Double that by only having one section reaching out, triple it by going all out.

So in essence one could argue its like having 4 weapons on one platform. You have a trapping weapon, a peasant flail, an regular flail and two baston.

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Frost890

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I have always love the adage of "It is better to have and not need then to need and not have." I have a problem with carrying a gun in a lot of places. I am military currently and am planning on going back to school to get in to the medical sector. That prevents my from carrying my gun.

And thanks everyone for the responses.
 

Balrog

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You can't go wrong carrying a large Mag-Lite in your car. Hey, it's a flashlight, right? The fact that you can "light someone up" with it is immaterial.
 

Gerry Seymour

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Probably the better option for weapons carry at least until the states fix the laws to allow the other weapons as well. I would be more afraid of someone with a gun than a throwing star. As long as the throwing start doesn't crack me in the head or face I'll be fine. lol.
For those of us who travel a lot, even this isn't a good answer. I can't always expect to check luggage on my return trip (timing issues), which means no guns when flying. And there are still states where I couldn't legally carry concealed or open, even if I still had my CCW. And in many places in some states, the weapon is prohibited by either law or by the tenant. In NC, for example, no guns at anything anyone paid to attend, and any store owner can post a sign prohibiting weapons - and most large stores do. It got to the point that I couldn't depend upon having the gun with me at any point, so I simply stopped carrying it, at all. It wasn't a dependable part of my self-protection outside my home.
 

oaktree

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Three types of weapons we use to carry on when I was with gangs if guns and knifes were not available 1. Chain 2. Pens 3. Locker lock. Locker lock was used like brass knuckles, pens were used as knife.
You can always improvise your weapons.
 

punisher73

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Get a big magazine, like Cigar Afficienado, and roll it up very tight. Hits hard like a baton and very legal to carry.

Get a Cross (metal) pen and you have a heavy duty kubaton type device that is also legal (my advice is to stay away from the "tactical pens" that are out there, they look like that are a writing weapon and will just draw attention--no pun intended).

As Mr. Mattocks pointed out, using an obi or sarong as a flexible weapon is easy to carry and use.

One of the more unique things I have witnessed, is my instructor always wears slip on dress shoes the majority of time when he is out and about. I have watched him use the sweep step from Naihanchi kata and remove the shoe and insert his hand into the shoe and use that as a counter weapon.
 

oaktree

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Speaking of pens do carry with me one of those pen knifes look and feel just like a pen my boss borrows it from me often though don't use through metal detector. A friend of mine use to carry with him one of those little bats made of wood novelty types , my dad use to sleep with a hammer under his pillow and his hand on it ready to throw it at anyone who open the bed room door.
 

Juany118

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Get a big magazine, like Cigar Afficienado, and roll it up very tight. Hits hard like a baton and very legal to carry.

Get a Cross (metal) pen and you have a heavy duty kubaton type device that is also legal (my advice is to stay away from the "tactical pens" that are out there, they look like that are a writing weapon and will just draw attention--no pun intended).

As Mr. Mattocks pointed out, using an obi or sarong as a flexible weapon is easy to carry and use.

One of the more unique things I have witnessed, is my instructor always wears slip on dress shoes the majority of time when he is out and about. I have watched him use the sweep step from Naihanchi kata and remove the shoe and insert his hand into the shoe and use that as a counter weapon.

Some companies are now making "board room" acceptable tactical pens though like\
Beretta TKX Tactical Pen

and this one isn't bad either...

UZI Tactical Glassbreaker Pen #8 - Black

but yeah the one I use at work

UZI Tacpen 6 2 models

not so much lol
 

punisher73

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Some companies are now making "board room" acceptable tactical pens though like\
Beretta TKX Tactical Pen

and this one isn't bad either...

UZI Tactical Glassbreaker Pen #8 - Black

but yeah the one I use at work

UZI Tacpen 6 2 models

not so much lol

I still think they look like "tactical pens". They look like you want to stab someone with it and using the "but it's a pen" excuse.
Why not something like this?
Cross Edge Titanium Rollerball Pen, Medium Point, Black/Chrome | Staples簧

Titanium pen and only $29, half the price. It looks like a pen.
 

Juany118

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I still think they look like "tactical pens". They look like you want to stab someone with it and using the "but it's a pen" excuse.
Why not something like this?
Cross Edge Titanium Rollerball Pen, Medium Point, Black/Chrome | Staples[emoji768]

Titanium pen and only $29, half the price. It looks like a pen.
Two things, first I said they were tac pens. Next look at the Italian with the cap on. That is think is the big thing on that one. That said pen #2 (don't actually own the Beretta) Can't tell you how many times my carry on back pack has had that next to my Mont Blanc and passed TSA.

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Saheim

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Why? Simple - there are people in this world whose sole job is creating laws. All of the good laws have already been made - Don't murder, rob, rape, etc. These lawmakers do not want the gravy train to stop, so they have to get really silly and try to come up with more laws. On the upside, for them, they get about 160K a year to create foolishness.

(imho) The two best tools you can carry are OC (pepper spray) and a handgun. This way you have both lethal and less lethal option. Also, you can show a "progression of force", if it comes down to it.

If I'm not mistaken (experts chime in) most of the martial arts "weapons" were improvised farming tools due to the tight restrictions places on weapons. This innovative spirit can be applied to today's world, as well. If you are unlucky enough to live in an area that strips you of your basic right to be prepared to defend yourself (gun laws), you can find "tools" that can be utilized for defense. The same way those who came before did with their farming equipment. Have a spare tire? Then having a tire iron makes sense. A baseball bat by itself, in your back seat is suspicious. However, a baseball, a bat, and a catcher's mitt in your back seat will raise few eyebrows.

I'm lucky enough to live in a state that treats all non firearm laws the same - it is legal to carry them openly and, if you have a concealed weapon permit, you can carry them concealed. I do have a permit and, legally, could carry whatever type of "martial arts weapon" I wanted, concealed. Personally, I opt for the OC and handgun :)
 
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