Why do Westerners train in exotic unrealistic weapons and ignore practical ones like baseball bats?

JowGaWolf

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The argument made sense when I was in school and teachers would say "you're not going to carry around a calculator with you everywhere you go." Back then, drilling in math was important.

Today, with smart phones having calculators built in...
Compared to what I used to do when I was in my 20's, the only thing I really calculate are bills and when it's time to eat. Even with money at the cash registers, how many people behind that register actually calculate how munch money they should give back to the customer. And for the customer, do we calculate the money in our minds or look so see what the register says?
 

JowGaWolf

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I am totally unable to do arithmetic in my head, I had really good teachers and I tried to learn my times tables by can't, I have the number equivalent of dyslexia, its called dyscalculia. I didn't get to take maths just try the arithmetic but I could do it if I used a calculator or pen and paper.
This is different. So the calculators thing that I'm talking about doesn't apply to you.. There's a big difference between I'm not able, and I don't want to.
 

pdg

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I don't know about that. What's the square root of 765? All you need to know is symbol on the calculator to get answer. You don't have know anything about square roots or how to calculate it.

5789 +5684.2 =? same thing. You don't have to know anything about addition. Just enter the numbers into calculator. GPS devices are also an easy one. If you travel at X speed, how long will it take you to get there. That's a math problem that is rarely calculated by anyone with a GPS. Even when I didn't have a GPS, I've never calculated that. So when you say that you still have to know how to solve the problem, I'm going to say that's not always true.

Weight conversions, distances, and temperature are also other examples of you not having to know the math .and you can still get the answer.

Odd.

With the exception of the square root (even then, I know the square of 25 is 625 and the square of 30 is 900 so the root of 765 is going to be between those two, I'd dismiss squaring 26 because that's too close to 25 and hey, I'm pretty much there - in my head I'd settle on 27.5 being close enough for government work), the majority of the other maths problems I would usually do faster in my head than the time it would take me to get out a calculator (or launch the app if I wasn't already holding a phone).

Even when I do use a calculator, I'll run a rough mental calc.

Say that one of "5789 +5684.2 =?" - well, I might punch it into a calculator (well, I wouldn't for something so simple, but for the sake of example) I'd stick say 5800+5700 into my head and tell myself "the answer is somewhere near 11500".

It's just what my dad taught me as a numpty check - I've seen plenty of times when someone would say the answer is 6273.2 and not notice that they missed a 7.

I can get usable accuracy with the other conversions quickly as well - lbs/kg is usually close enough to just double or half, 簞c/簞f is a case of halving in combination with adding or subtracting 32, distance is also easy enough - I'll be within a reasonable percentage of accuracy for most applications and if required can then increase the accuracy if the need arises.

Compared to what I used to do when I was in my 20's, the only thing I really calculate are bills and when it's time to eat. Even with money at the cash registers, how many people behind that register actually calculate how munch money they should give back to the customer. And for the customer, do we calculate the money in our minds or look so see what the register says?

As a customer, I always mentally calculate and check my change - and if there's not a massive amount of items I'll estimate the bill before I go to pay - the vast majority of items are very close to whole or half pounds (like 瞿1.99, or 瞿5.49, or even 37p where 50p is a good number for a fast estimate). It's happened many times that I've caught a double scan of an item when the cashier has read the total to me and I've noticed the too large discrepancy from my estimate...





I just realised, there's a remote possibility that I'm a bit of a nerd...
 

JowGaWolf

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I just realised, there's a remote possibility that I'm a bit of a nerd...
ha ha ha.. nope. just one of the rare ones or good with numbers.

Some people are good with numbers and some aren't. My son is much better at numbers than I ever was. Not sure where he got that from but it definitely wasn't me lol. I'm not that great in math. It always requires a different level of focus for me. Which is strange because give me a set of numbers and data points and I'm heaven. For example, I can tell you what percentage of time I spend of certain tasks in my workplace. I can break down into task completed, tasks not started, tasks in progress. If any one asks me my contribution I can show it in a chart and I can tell you what time and day I began the task and how long I worked. But as far as calculating all of that, I'm like. nah.. that doesn't sound like fun.

Keep in mind I'm not required to do any of this. This is stuff that I do simply because it's interesting to me. When I turn on my GPS I analyze the time that the GPS says I will be their and I can hit get really close to how much the GPS will be off, even when the GPS is analyzing traffic.

Come to think about it, it may be that if there was a physical or analytical aspect attached (something beyond the answer) then I become more involved with math. If it's just solving a math problem for the sake of solving a math problem then I didn't enjoy it.

I like to play football, but don't like to watch it. I ran track for 6 years and may have only watched televised track single events in my entire life. I've played soccer but I don't watch it; it's the same with tennis. I was never good in Calculus, but one day I had to tutor a student who was having trouble with it, to my surprise After more than 10 years of even seeing Calculus, I was able to grasp the concepts after one read and explain it in a way that helped the girl, I was tutoring get an A on her test. If I can have that "something beyond the answer" then my focus and absorption are excellent.

If it's an answer for the sake of an answer and no other purpose then I'm going to be sub average.
 

pdg

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@JowGaWolf - as is to be expected, we have things in common and also differences...

In common, there are things I like to do but get bored stiff watching much of, like cycling. I something watch videos of people doing tours, but racing I can't get into much (I watched the tour de France when I lived there, partially because it went past my house).

Conversely, I actually enjoy doing maths for no other reason than just to get the answer. I'm the sort of person who would take a few measurements to estimate the number of grains of sand on a beach, or sugar in a jar... I find it a relaxing distraction if other aspects of life are getting on my mind for whatever reason, I can have a sit with something like an electronic theory book and work some stuff out.

And another difference, I'm rarely good at teaching stuff, especially maths. I can explain how I understand it, but if the subject doesn't understand that explanation then the best I can usually do is repeat myself and see if it sinks in :/ Luckily for my kids, it's rare that they don't grasp my explanation first (or maybe second) time, sometimes simply because I explain it differently to their school teachers.
 

Tez3

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This is different. So the calculators thing that I'm talking about doesn't apply to you.. There's a big difference between I'm not able, and I don't want to.


Do Americans call everything maths? Maths to us is algebra, geometry and arithmetic, three separate subjects under one heading, but each is a subject in itself. I only did arithmetic as school as it was mandatory, didn't do the other two.
 

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Do Americans call everything maths? Maths to us is algebra, geometry and arithmetic, three separate subjects under one heading, but each is a subject in itself. I only did arithmetic as school as it was mandatory, didn't do the other two.

I think that may be one reason we call it mathS and they call it just math.

We pluralise it for a reason.
 

JowGaWolf

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Do Americans call everything maths? Maths to us is algebra, geometry and arithmetic, three separate subjects under one heading, but each is a subject in itself. I only did arithmetic as school as it was mandatory, didn't do the other two.
Not sure. I never thought about it.
 

Tez3

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We call it maths because the whole word is mathematics not mathematic. I also forgot, my OH reminded me, that there's also trigonometry which obviously I didn't do either lol.
 

pdg

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Doing stuff like electronics and machining for hobbies, I use at least basic to mildly intermediate levels in most branches of maths just for fun...

And that's after probably making the stereotypical statement at school "when am I ever going to use this stuff anyway?"

All the time as it happens.
 

Tez3

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"when am I ever going to use this stuff anyway?"


That could equally be said about the English taught at school, so many can't seem to remember that what they were taught is actually useful for communicating to other people lol. Grammar and spelling are important, it can change the whole meaning of a sentence if you don't use them properly.:D:D:D:D
 

Gerry Seymour

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Do Americans call everything maths? Maths to us is algebra, geometry and arithmetic, three separate subjects under one heading, but each is a subject in itself. I only did arithmetic as school as it was mandatory, didn't do the other two.
I think generally most folks include all of that in "math". The one difference is that we don't much distinguish (in lay discussion) between "arithmetic" and "math". In fact, you won't find most Americans using the word "arithmetic" - it's just the first stage of "math".
 

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We call it maths because the whole word is mathematics not mathematic. I also forgot, my OH reminded me, that there's also trigonometry which obviously I didn't do either lol.
Do you guys use the term "calculus"? And does that fall within "maths"?
 

skribs

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We call it maths because the whole word is mathematics not mathematic. I also forgot, my OH reminded me, that there's also trigonometry which obviously I didn't do either lol.

MATHematic, MATHematics, the abbreviation works for both.
 

pdg

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MATHematic, MATHematics, the abbreviation works for both.

In proper English, the term "mathematic" (no s) can only be in such context as "mathematic ability", "mathematic process" or similar.

With no s, it would never be used in any other form. You would certainly never say anything like "I enjoy mathematic" because it makes no grammatical sense.

As for the abbreviated form, in any context you would only ever use "maths" and never drop the s, no matter the context.
 

skribs

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In proper English, the term "mathematic" (no s) can only be in such context as "mathematic ability", "mathematic process" or similar.

With no s, it would never be used in any other form. You would certainly never say anything like "I enjoy mathematic" because it makes no grammatical sense.

As for the abbreviated form, in any context you would only ever use "maths" and never drop the s, no matter the context.

Why is "math" not an abbreviation for mathematics?

There are plenty of abbreviations for plural words where the abbreviation isn't pluralized.

Edit to add:
Definition of math | Dictionary.com
Definition of maths | Dictionary.com

According to this site, "Math" is a generally accepted abbreviation, and "Maths" is the chiefly British abbreviation.
 

pdg

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Why is "math" not an abbreviation for mathematics?

There are plenty of abbreviations for plural words where the abbreviation isn't pluralized.

Edit to add:
Definition of math | Dictionary.com
Definition of maths | Dictionary.com

According to this site, "Math" is a generally accepted abbreviation, and "Maths" is the chiefly British abbreviation.

Actually, it's the other way around.

"Maths" is the generally accepted abbreviation while "math" is pretty much exclusively used in one single country (plus a small portion of Canada).

Linking to an American dictionary really has no bearing on the spelling or usage of words anywhere outside the US.

I've just checked a few words using dictionary.com where your spelling differs, and they all came with "chiefly British" - making no mention of 75%+ of Canada, south Africa, Australia, the other countries within the UK and the whole raft of countries that were historically part of the British empire where English is used as a very strong second language as well as the majority of Europe and everything stretching into the eastern bloc.

Disagree with this post too if you like, just be aware that just because you disagree doesn't mean it's not a plain and verifiable fact (as long as you use sources from absolutely anywhere in the world except the US).

The case is identical for the US substitution of 'z' instead of 's', and also the insertion or removal of vowels from many words. As well as for numerical date format.

In all these areas, the US stands absolutely alone (usually while telling everyone else on earth that they're wrong).
 

skribs

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In all these areas, the US stands absolutely alone (usually while telling everyone else on earth that they're wrong).

Um...I never said "maths" was wrong. You're the one that said "math" was wrong. So who is telling who which one is wrong?

All I did was argue that "math" is not incorrect.
 

pdg

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Um...I never said "maths" was wrong. You're the one that said "math" was wrong. So who is telling who which one is wrong?

All I did was argue that "math" is not incorrect.

By saying that it's not incorrect, you expressly implied that my previous explanation was wrong.

The difference is that I was saying you were wrong to be applying American English language rules to anything other than American English - not that you were wrong to be using the rules governing your particular language.

"Math" is incorrect in everything except American English - and I have no problem with it being correct there, until the point where it's argued that because it's correct there it surely must be "not incorrect" for the rest of the world.
 
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