What type of martial art is for me?

Midnight-shadow

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No question. I also realize that the length of an academy is not enough time to teach you adequately what may need to be done in a life-or-death situation, either.

I imagine they will give you continuous training and assessments to make sure you are competent even after passing the course.
 

CB Jones

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I imagine they will give you continuous training and assessments to make sure you are competent even after passing the course.

:confused: No. They will probably do a 4-8 hour re-trainer for certification purposes once a year and everyone passes that attends.
 

drop bear

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Wrestling. Some sort of folk style or catch. With a lot of hand fighting clinch work and getting up off the ground.

Clinch work will negate punches. Hand fighting will negate weapons. And then all you need to do is learn how to tun an arm control into an arm lock.

Basically you want to learn how to gain a dominant position and then either cripple them or subdue them.
 

drop bear

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:confused: No. They will probably do a 4-8 hour re-trainer for certification purposes once a year and everyone passes that attends.

Good old human weapon class.

Goose necks can be employed under any circumstances by anyone of any size and subdue any attacker because of the magic of pain compliance.
 

Midnight-shadow

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:confused: No. They will probably do a 4-8 hour re-trainer for certification purposes once a year and everyone passes that attends.

Really? As a lifeguard I have to do 2 hours training a month and all I do is sit in a chair most of the time.....
 

senseiblackbelt

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Are correction officers allowed to strike inmates? Or is that considered abuse? I thought the ideal situation was to subdue them without injuring them, which is why I recommended Aikido and Judo over more striking-focused arts.

Correction officers are allowed to strike inmates, provided that its done in self defense ONLY. I'm assuming that if you can subdue them without injuring them, then that is the better alternative. If that's the case, then go for it.
 

oftheherd1

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And to clarify the reason I say a good striking art....the takedowns/joint locks taught in defensive tactics are decent....the striking they teach in those defensive tactic systems usually suck greatly.

Takedowns and joint locks are decent? But better to attack them with strikes than takedowns or joint locks? You would be a favorite as a correctional officer, no doubt.

I see you study Karate. Does your style also teach grappling techniques? Or have you studied a grappling art that did not teach strikes?

I agree with you that strikes are important, but I was taught to first work on blocks. I was taught to use strikes or kicks once it was safe to do so, but would also look to use (even prefer to use) joint locks or a throw. Then employ a strike at the end of a technique.

Joint locks imply control. That is usually preferred in law enforcement or correction type work. Disregarding effectiveness, striking tends to look like simply fighting in the public's experience. You may have no choice, and if so, you should give it all you have. But using a control will usually take the fight out of an opponent.
 

CB Jones

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Takedowns and joint locks are decent? But better to attack them with strikes than takedowns or joint locks? You would be a favorite as a correctional officer, no doubt.

I see you study Karate. Does your style also teach grappling techniques? Or have you studied a grappling art that did not teach strikes?

I agree with you that strikes are important, but I was taught to first work on blocks. I was taught to use strikes or kicks once it was safe to do so, but would also look to use (even prefer to use) joint locks or a throw. Then employ a strike at the end of a technique.

Joint locks imply control. That is usually preferred in law enforcement or correction type work. Disregarding effectiveness, striking tends to look like simply fighting in the public's experience. You may have no choice, and if so, you should give it all you have. But using a control will usually take the fight out of an opponent.

You are misunderstanding or I did a crummy way of explaining. I'll try again.

As a correctional officer, he should receive training and certification in some type of defensive tactic system.

The takedowns and joint locks taught are decent techniques they also put you in position for handcuffing. Using those techniques also provides some protection in civil court if used within policy.

The striking they teach is usually pretty bad.....because it is so bad. I suggest a good striking art to supplement the lack of quality in that aspect.
 

Steve

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You've already narrowed down that you're going primarily for self defense. The actual art matters less than how they train. Find some schools near you and go and watch. Are they actually punching, kicking, and throwing each other to the ground? Or are they doing it to the air? While the latter meets some people's needs for fitness, personal devrlopment, etc., it won't give you the hands on training that you need.
This. How they train matters more than the style.
 

oftheherd1

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You are misunderstanding or I did a crummy way of explaining. I'll try again.

As a correctional officer, he should receive training and certification in some type of defensive tactic system.

The takedowns and joint locks taught are decent techniques they also put you in position for handcuffing. Using those techniques also provides some protection in civil court if used within policy.

The striking they teach is usually pretty bad.....because it is so bad. I suggest a good striking art to supplement the lack of quality in that aspect.

Ah, I see I did indeed misunderstand. I must have forgot to engage my brain before I put my fingers in motion.
 

KangTsai

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You'll do with training in whatever art. However, keep in mind that when someone attacks you in a prison, you should assume it's to kill you. Just keep that in mind when picking.
 
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firelake

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Joint locks imply control. That is usually preferred in law enforcement or correction type work. Disregarding effectiveness, striking tends to look like simply fighting in the public's experience. You may have no choice, and if so, you should give it all you have. But using a control will usually take the fight out of an opponent.

Yeah that's why I'm also looking at the viability of Aikido for that very thing.
 

CB Jones

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Again from my experience...you need to know how to strike. To me that is where training is the most deficient.

A lot of focus on takedowns and joint locks in training....very little in striking and defense.
 

Tez3

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Looking around at what different arts teach and what I need.

Do you know the difference between different styles of karate or are you taking the generic name 'karate' as all being one thing therefore only teaching one thing? Are you assuming that 'karate' is just striking or did you know that most styles actually have everything you need? that it has in addition to strikes, locks, takedowns, holds and a lot more than yo imagine. 'Karate' isn't what you see on 'Karate Kid'. Don't undervalue it because you haven't seen what it offers.
 

CB Jones

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'Karate' isn't what you see on 'Karate Kid'. Don't undervalue it because you haven't seen what it offers.

So are you saying I'm not gonna become a karate master by waxing the car and painting the fence?
 
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firelake

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Do you know the difference between different styles of karate or are you taking the generic name 'karate' as all being one thing therefore only teaching one thing? Are you assuming that 'karate' is just striking or did you know that most styles actually have everything you need? that it has in addition to strikes, locks, takedowns, holds and a lot more than yo imagine. 'Karate' isn't what you see on 'Karate Kid'. Don't undervalue it because you haven't seen what it offers.

I'm trying to find out what everything offers, and that's the problem. It's hard to find concrete answers. I visited a Shotokan dojo a couple summers ago and watched a class. It's really difficult to assess an art by short-term observation.

I'm trying to find out what these disciplines offer so I can see what is the best fit for me and also what I can access locally. It's turned into a serious pain in the ***.
 

Jenna

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So are you saying I'm not gonna become a karate master by waxing the car and painting the fence?
No.. did you not read the curriculum? It is like somewhere near the back.. You must ALSO find an evil dojo -you got one of those in your town right?- and vanquish them.. THEN you will be a karate master..

alternatively, I got a piece of paper right here -is handwritten and stuff.. like we can call it a "certificate" if you like- and this paper will confer karate mastership upon you if you wax my car and paint my fence.. over the next few years I mean.. ha..
 
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