want to be world champion but no talent at all

Joined
Aug 13, 2021
Messages
14
Reaction score
8
I'm learning boxing for 3 months and I want to be a world champion but my coach says I'm really bad, he's now sending someone who trains a month in total to the competition and I asked him why I was not sent to the competition he said: because he has more potential than you, you could say it broke my heart And the truth is I do not like this coach because he always comes down on me and calls me fat even though I am not fat, how can I be a champion with such a non-supportive coach and with the fact that I have no talent at all? And there are no other boxing gyms in my city I live in a country where boxing is a very weak sport, the coach always tells others that they are better than me and it annoys me a lot I really do not know what to do
 
I'm learning boxing for 3 months and I want to be a world champion but my coach says I'm really bad, he's now sending someone who trains a month in total to the competition and I asked him why I was not sent to the competition he said: because he has more potential than you, you could say it broke my heart And the truth is I do not like this coach because he always comes down on me and calls me fat even though I am not fat, how can I be a champion with such a non-supportive coach and with the fact that I have no talent at all? And there are no other boxing gyms in my city I live in a country where boxing is a very weak sport, the coach always tells others that they are better than me and it annoys me a lot I really do not know what to do
Listen to your coach and find another activity. Sometimes perseverance pays off but that is up to you just how much time you went to spend with a non-supportive coach.....
 
I'm learning boxing for 3 months and I want to be a world champion but my coach says I'm really bad, he's now sending someone who trains a month in total to the competition and I asked him why I was not sent to the competition he said: because he has more potential than you, you could say it broke my heart And the truth is I do not like this coach because he always comes down on me and calls me fat even though I am not fat, how can I be a champion with such a non-supportive coach and with the fact that I have no talent at all? And there are no other boxing gyms in my city I live in a country where boxing is a very weak sport, the coach always tells others that they are better than me and it annoys me a lot I really do not know what to do
Post like these are very hard to respond to since we only hear one side of the story and never see any of it.
One logical answer is to move on and find another gym or activity.
Another is that your coach is 'toughening you up'. Never comfortable to go through and some people never get through it, at least in the way being presented. But if you are adamant about boxing and this gym is your only choice then your options are limited as I see it.

3 months is not a huge sample. I would suggest stepping back, KEEP working out, and let the training do it's job. I would say give any program a year. Evaluate on where/what you were when you began training versus where/what you are in a year. This is assuming you are committed at a reasonable level of training and not just popping in once or twice a week.
Best of luck and let us know how it goes.
 
Don't stop going there yet, but check out another gym (different sport like kickboxing/muay thai if world champion is your main goal and theirs no other boxing gyms around) and see what they say. May just be your coach, or you may want to choose a different activity, or just accept that you won't be world champion. No real way for us to know from here.
That's on top of what dv said about assuming you're committed and training seriously as is.
 
Also, where are the people that your fellow boxing students are competing against training/from? One option would be to go to whatever gym their competitors go to if you're having trouble finding a different one.
 
Some random thoughts ...
  • Some boxing coaches subscribe to the "drill sergeant" approach rather than the "cheerleader" approach. They believe that verbal harshness is necessary to push their athletes to work hard and excel. I heard a coach I know once explain that his job was to try to make the athlete want to quit - with the implication that then he could focus on helping the fighters who had the mental toughness to carry on and keep training through the physical and mental stress. I'm not personally a fan of this approach, but I will note that these coaches often eventually show more respect to athletes who demonstrate the fortitude to push through the "hazing" and show continued improvement.
  • If you've only been training for 3 months, then it's entirely likely that you just aren't technically or physically ready for competition. Your coach may be protecting you from getting hurt. The other student with 1 month of experience may have just come in with a higher starting level of athleticism which makes the coach think he can handle getting in the ring already. (I certainly hope so, because 1 month of training isn't really enough to prepare most people for their first fight.)
  • If you've only been training for 3 months, then it's way too early to say anything about what your true "potential" as a fighter might be. You're still just getting your feet wet in the art. Honestly, "potential" isn't that relevant. 99.9+% of people never get particularly close to their maximum potential in any field they enter. Once you spend a bunch of time putting in a lot of really hard work, then maybe you might get a glimpse at what your potential limit might be in a particular endeavor and have an idea of whether it's worth it to you to put in the necessary time, work, suffering, and sacrifice necessary to reach that personal pinnacle.
 

Latest Discussions

Back
Top