Spinning Back Kick or Spinning Hook Kick?

Lynne

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The break I have to do next week is the spinning back kick, dwi tullryo chagi. It's a spinning hook kick, not this:

We almost do Chuck Liddell's version to go from orange belt to green belt. We don't do a sidekick. (Not sure what he is doing at the beginning with the sidekick - the tape was too mumbly for me to hear it.) We kick straight back. We simply call it a back kick or dwi chagi. Our proper form is to turn 180, look over our shoulder at the target, and back kick the target.

I thought there might be some confusion. What do you call the spinning hook kick? Do you call it a spinning back kick?
 
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Lynne

Lynne

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I call a back kick dwi-chagi, and a hook kick nak-sae-chagi.
I believe we call the hook kick yup hurygi chagi. I realized this morning that most people do not call the spinning hook kick the spinning back kick. I'm not sure why we do.
 

JoelD

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The break I have to do next week is the spinning back kick, dwi tullryo chagi. It's a spinning hook kick, not this:

We almost do Chuck Liddell's version to go from orange belt to green belt. We don't do a sidekick. (Not sure what he is doing at the beginning with the sidekick - the tape was too mumbly for me to hear it.) We kick straight back. We simply call it a back kick or dwi chagi. Our proper form is to turn 180, look over our shoulder at the target, and back kick the target.

I thought there might be some confusion. What do you call the spinning hook kick? Do you call it a spinning back kick?

Lynne, In our classes there are a few different spinning kicks even though when done at speed a dwi cha gi (back kick) and an E dan dwi cha gi (Jump back kick) almost looks like youre spinning but the hips are squared with the target. The spinning kicks use the force of the hip rotation for power and the leg moves in an arc. anyways a couple of the big ones i can think of are:

Short spinning kick or Dwi Ahneso Pahkuro Cha Gi - Starting in a side stance the back leg kicks in a short, high arc and the torso remains upright. designed to kick an opponent close to you.

Long spinning kick or Dwi Hu Ri Gi - Starting in a side stance the back leg kicks however during the spin the torso moves such that the knot of your belt will point at the ground in the middle of the hip rotation. This causes the kick to extend into a long outward arc, hence the name 'long spinning kick'. Executed to kick an opponent farther away. This kick is probably the equivalent of your spinning hook kick i would think though perhaps with the of snapping the knee forward just before impact.

Jump reverse outside inside kick or E Dan Dwi Pahkeso Ahnuro Cha Gi - Starting in a side stance the rear leg is lifted and spun around to the front in a forward moving jump. The leg that started of in the front is lifted and executes the kick as the hip spins through in a short high arc. Even though the arc of the kick is close to your own body you can really cover alot of forward ground with the initial forward jump with the rear leg.

On all of these kicks the kicking leg is always held straight.
 
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Gi1

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We call it spinning back kick (dwi dull ro cha gi) where you kick with the back leg bringing it all the way round and place the leg back behind the other again after and side hook kick (yup hu ri gi) where you kick with the front leg and put it down in front after. They are the basic ones.
 
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Lynne

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We call it spinning back kick (dwi dull ro cha gi) where you kick with the back leg bringing it all the way round and place the leg back behind the other again after and side hook kick (yup hu ri gi) where you kick with the front leg and put it down in front after. They are the basic ones.
Evidently, the Korean name for the spinning back (hook) kick is dwi dull ro cha gi (I guess I can see how the hook kick is a sort of reverse roundhouse). My daughter told me our Sa Ba Nim usually calls the kick a spinning hook kick and the instructors tend to say spinning back kick. Why do they use the Korean word for roundhouse, I wonder?
 
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foggymorning162

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The way we are taught is in the video he first demonstrates a spinning side, then a spinning back just like he says. A spinning hook starts like the spinning side as it is loaded high and the foot is horizontal not vertical but the kick is thrown at approximately 130 degrees or just before your target then the foot is for lack of a better description jerked back so the heel does the kick. I don't know if this makes sense it's easier to demonstrate then explain which is saying a lot because I hate that kick.
 

Muwubu16858

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It spins backward (dwi) in a round (Dol Ryo) motion. Also in some other Tang Soo Do styles, there is more than one type of backswinging kick. We have several in my style, each taught at different levels and used for different reasons.
 

DMcHenry

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"dull ro cha gi" doesn't actually mean "roundhouse kick", simply means "turning kick". A 'turning' kick is what we call a 'roundhouse' kick.

A dwi (back) dullro (turning) chagi (kick) can describe the back kick. I guess you could call it dwi yup chagi or tullo dwi chagi too.
 

MBuzzy

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WELL, if we're just talking about pure naming and terminology/translation stuff.....I can help a bit. Keep in mind that different schools use different terms for different things. So be sure that you check with your Sa Bom, because what he/she says is ALWAYS right!

But....

Back Kick - Dwi Chagi - 뒤차기
Turning Back Kick (Literal) - Dwi Dullyeo Chagi - 뒤돌려차기
Turning Hook Kick - Dwi Hureo Chagi - 되후려차기
Side Hook Kick - Yup Hureo Chagi or Yup Huri Gi - 옆후려차기 or 옆후리기
 

MBuzzy

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"because what he/she says is ALWAYS right!"

Not according to my wife, she is! ;)

{just joking}

hahaha, Mine too! I can be right at work, I can be right in class....but at home, I'm always wrong!

The way I see it, your instructor is the one who is grading you and is responsible for your promotions and training, so if they tell you something, just assume it is right!
 
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foggymorning162

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So be sure that you check with your Sa Bom, because what he/she says is ALWAYS right!

I agree 100% every organization is different, every school is different heck every teacher is different.

Not according to my wife, she is! ;)

Did you know that if a man says something in the woods and his wife is not there to hear him..............he's still wrong. (quote from Micheal J. Fox the other day on the Rachel Ray show)
 

terryl965

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Always check with your instructor do as he likes, remember when in Rome be a Roman.

PS my wife is always right too.
 

JT_the_Ninja

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Anywhere you see "dulryo," it involves turning, as in dulryo chagi = roundhouse kick:

dwi chagi = back kick
dwi dulryo chagi = back wheel kick

yup chagi = side kick
dulryo yup chagi = turning side kick

Tang Soo!
 

JoelD

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I have never heard "Dwi Dullryo Cha Gi" before....

Heres a question on a different kick though... Peet Cha Gi, kind of the defining kick of Soo Bahk Do i guess.

this one, for those who dont know... it is at 3:44 in the video below...

I have heard it referred to as the reverse roundhouse kick in english... so why have i never heard it called "Tuel Oh Dollyro Cha Gi". What is the literal translation of "Peet"?
 
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Tez3

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The break I have to do next week is the spinning back kick, dwi tullryo chagi. It's a spinning hook kick, not this:

We almost do Chuck Liddell's version to go from orange belt to green belt. We don't do a sidekick. (Not sure what he is doing at the beginning with the sidekick - the tape was too mumbly for me to hear it.) We kick straight back. We simply call it a back kick or dwi chagi. Our proper form is to turn 180, look over our shoulder at the target, and back kick the target.

I thought there might be some confusion. What do you call the spinning hook kick? Do you call it a spinning back kick?

What Chucks doing is what we call a 'fighting' back kick, though my instrucutor tends to keep his leg straighter as in a crescent kick. We do the 'traditional' one as you've described back kicking the target. A tip I was given as my balance is a bit iffy is instead of looking over your shoulder aim your bum at the target and you will hit it, a little practice and it works very well for me.
 
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MBuzzy

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I have never heard "Dwi Dullryo Cha Gi" before....

Heres a question on a different kick though... Peet Cha Gi, kind of the defining kick of Soo Bahk Do i guess.

this one, for those who dont know... it is at 3:44 in the video below...

I have heard it referred to as the reverse roundhouse kick in english... so why have i never heard it called "Tuel Oh Dollyro Cha Gi". What is the literal translation of "Peet"?

I'll have to look up Peet Cha Gi when I get home, my online dictionary has become a pay site! I think that it is just a proper name for that technique. I have always heard it translated to reverse roundhouse kick. I'll see what I can find when I get home tonight.
 
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Gi1

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Yeah we call Peet Cha gi reverse roundhouse in English. E-dan Peet Cha gi cost me a cruciate ligament when I landed.
 

JoelD

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Yeah we call Peet Cha gi reverse roundhouse in English. E-dan Peet Cha gi cost me a cruciate ligament when I landed.

Youch.... never heard of doing a jumping version of that one.
 

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