Help with the Spin Hook/Back Kicks

Ivan

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My club trains in two variants of the Spin Back Kick. One is spinning whilst keeping the kicking leg straight - I have issues doing this one on both legs as I can't seem to keep it straight for the full rotation and I would like your help to correct this.

The other is the Spin Hook Kick - you start the spin with your leg chambered, extend it when you see your target and execute a normal hook kick whilst you're spinning, and then land.

I seem to be mixing these kicks into some sort of hybrid kick. I start off with my leg straight, and because I can't seem to keep it straight I end up doing a hook kick. I have a video of myself below doing it. I was hoping for some advice on the following points:
  • How do I keep my leg straight for the full rotation?
  • How can I practice this kick consecutively? - I start to get dizzy and it completely throws off my balance
  • How do I improve my overall balance?
  • Should I be kicking my root foot flat or on my toes?
I personally feel like my normal hook kick is good enough to move up these variations of the kick. I will post a video of me doing the hook kick too so I can receive some criticism and iron out any flaws before dedicating myself to this kick.


Any advice, criticisms, feedback is welcomed and appreciated. Please don't feel the need to spare my ego, and feel free to put it bluntly. Thanks guys :)
 

drop bear

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For the straight leg kick. Kick longer. So pretend your target is further away and reach forwards. This will push your hips and straighten your leg.
 

jobo

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tie a sweeping brush handle to your leg,

or at least try kicking a target that is exactly one straight leg distance a away that way you should naturally correct or youl miss
 

dvcochran

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I think what you are describing is most often called a spinning wheel kick. There are several variants and it is taught different ways. In WT training the leg/foot motion is described as a bell curve. I like this description but for most people the trailing slope is not as steep. Picture the curve drawn on the floor, not the wall. It is paramount that the upper body turns With the kick; a little lead is okay but the shoulders should not be way ahead of the foot. Flexibility drives this quite a bit. Shoulders leading too much or not enough is a common problem for people who have trouble recovering or maintaining control of the kicking leg post contact. Equally important is to keep rotating on the standing foot, on the ball not the heel. If it gets locked in place finishing the kick it tough.
For practice and perfecting technique work the kick lower where you are in a comfortable range for your flexibility. Get the motion down first, not worrying about height. Remember, the force and strike of the kick is traveling Horizontal, then wanes off the peak of the curve. The velocity of the leg 'helps' the body recover to a start/guard position but should not be totally dependent on it.
It is a totally different motion from a hook kick even though the foot is positioned the same.

As far as the dizziness; anyone is going to get dizzy if they do enough kick consecutively. One thing that helps with any spinning kick is to get your eyes around and focused on a point (usually the target). Never let your eyes 'float' through the arc with the leg.

Balance has a Lot to do with muscle strength. Doing kicks slowly helps with coordination, tone and balance. Very similar to how dancers practice.

The heel of the root foot is off the ground just enough to spin on the ball of the foot. Never high so that it feels like the ankle may twist. When the rotation is complete place the heel back on the floor.

Stay at it.
 

_Simon_

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I think what you are describing is most often called a spinning wheel kick. There are several variants and it is taught different ways. In WT training the leg/foot motion is described as a bell curve. I like this description but for most people the trailing slope is not as steep. Picture the curve drawn on the floor, not the wall. It is paramount that the upper body turns With the kick; a little lead is okay but the shoulders should not be way ahead of the foot. Flexibility drives this quite a bit. Shoulders leading too much or not enough is a common problem for people who have trouble recovering or maintaining control of the kicking leg post contact. Equally important is to keep rotating on the standing foot, on the ball not the heel. If it gets locked in place finishing the kick it tough.
For practice and perfecting technique work the kick lower where you are in a comfortable range for your flexibility. Get the motion down first, not worrying about height. Remember, the force and strike of the kick is traveling Horizontal, then wanes off the peak of the curve. The velocity of the leg 'helps' the body recover to a start/guard position but should not be totally dependent on it.
It is a totally different motion from a hook kick even though the foot is positioned the same.

As far as the dizziness; anyone is going to get dizzy if they do enough kick consecutively. One thing that helps with any spinning kick is to get your eyes around and focused on a point (usually the target). Never let your eyes 'float' through the arc with the leg.

Balance has a Lot to do with muscle strength. Doing kicks slowly helps with coordination, tone and balance. Very similar to how dancers practice.

The heel of the root foot is off the ground just enough to spin on the ball of the foot. Never high so that it feels like the ankle may twist. When the rotation is complete place the heel back on the floor.

Stay at it.
This is such a thorough and awesome guide, great post @dvcochran :)
 

drop bear

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I think what you are describing is most often called a spinning wheel kick. There are several variants and it is taught different ways. In WT training the leg/foot motion is described as a bell curve. I like this description but for most people the trailing slope is not as steep. Picture the curve drawn on the floor, not the wall. It is paramount that the upper body turns With the kick; a little lead is okay but the shoulders should not be way ahead of the foot. Flexibility drives this quite a bit. Shoulders leading too much or not enough is a common problem for people who have trouble recovering or maintaining control of the kicking leg post contact. Equally important is to keep rotating on the standing foot, on the ball not the heel. If it gets locked in place finishing the kick it tough.
For practice and perfecting technique work the kick lower where you are in a comfortable range for your flexibility. Get the motion down first, not worrying about height. Remember, the force and strike of the kick is traveling Horizontal, then wanes off the peak of the curve. The velocity of the leg 'helps' the body recover to a start/guard position but should not be totally dependent on it.
It is a totally different motion from a hook kick even though the foot is positioned the same.

As far as the dizziness; anyone is going to get dizzy if they do enough kick consecutively. One thing that helps with any spinning kick is to get your eyes around and focused on a point (usually the target). Never let your eyes 'float' through the arc with the leg.

Balance has a Lot to do with muscle strength. Doing kicks slowly helps with coordination, tone and balance. Very similar to how dancers practice.

The heel of the root foot is off the ground just enough to spin on the ball of the foot. Never high so that it feels like the ankle may twist. When the rotation is complete place the heel back on the floor.

Stay at it.


Just so he gets the idea.
 

oftheherd11

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My club trains in two variants of the Spin Back Kick. One is spinning whilst keeping the kicking leg straight - I have issues doing this one on both legs as I can't seem to keep it straight for the full rotation and I would like your help to correct this.

The other is the Spin Hook Kick - you start the spin with your leg chambered, extend it when you see your target and execute a normal hook kick whilst you're spinning, and then land.

I seem to be mixing these kicks into some sort of hybrid kick. I start off with my leg straight, and because I can't seem to keep it straight I end up doing a hook kick. I have a video of myself below doing it. I was hoping for some advice on the following points:
  • How do I keep my leg straight for the full rotation?
  • How can I practice this kick consecutively? - I start to get dizzy and it completely throws off my balance
  • How do I improve my overall balance?
  • Should I be kicking my root foot flat or on my toes?
I personally feel like my normal hook kick is good enough to move up these variations of the kick. I will post a video of me doing the hook kick too so I can receive some criticism and iron out any flaws before dedicating myself to this kick.


Any advice, criticisms, feedback is welcomed and appreciated. Please don't feel the need to spare my ego, and feel free to put it bluntly. Thanks guys :)

I would discourage turning the trunk to start the move. It telegraphs the move. The first time I saw a hook side kick it started out like a side kick. Then suddenly it moved a little to the left with the kicker's leg bent very slightly, but straightening at the last movement and landing in the opponent's stomach. We all sat there dumbfounded and asking each other what we just saw. It was very effective.

Many years later I learned taking a step forward and spinning on the forward-stepping leg, and dropping during the turn. We also dropped forward on our hands so a lot less time and energy needed to be expended on balance (a lot of work with pushups helps control during recovery). Later I learned to take a very small step to just in front of my (what then was my rear foot) and dropping. The kicking leg can be swung outward and back for more momentum or sent straight to a falling side kick that is also a hook kick.

Sorry I have no video as I am sure my explanations are confusing.
 
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