Respect / Ettiquette...

Spookey

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Dear All,

I would like to speak briefly about the way in which respect is displayed in the Dojang. Over the last few threads there have been questions and comments regarding clapping and bowing and so on. Some have been in favor and some opposed. Some question the tradition (or reason for) behind these practices.
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In Eastern (Asian) culture the bow is merely a physical salutation much like the western salute or hand shake. Rememer that "martial" implies military (which is where most of the tradition and ettiquette deries from. All military forces have a hierarchy structure.

Bowing...(please remember that a bow and a salute are interchangable)

In a military setting it is required to immediately acknowledge the presence of a senior officer with a salute (ie when the instructor inters the room). Also, it is common for a unit (class of students) to be called to attention for a unified acknowledgement of the seniors presence. If during drill or any other distracting practice a senior officer enters the facility the senior in charge (assistant instructor) will call the unit to attention to acknowledge the officers presence. Militarily speaking there are "Non-Salute" areas or "Hats off" areas such as social courtyards where you are not required to salute an officer. This would be the same as seeing your instructor in the market place.

Clapping...(when a Senior enters the room)

This tradition can be traced specifically to the Oh Do Kwan (among many other martial institutes). You are training in TKD in a military setting where there are plenty of "Stripes & Bars" coming and going. Now bare in mind that there is plenty of yelling and screaming going on (kihaps-instruction-etc.) so the general, verbal call to attention might be a little hard to distinguish. Under these circumstanes the senior in charge would clap (2x) very harshly to draw the attention of the class and then give a verbal call to attention.

These practices have been carried down through to the civilian dojang in one form or another. However, there are verying degrees to which they will be socially acceptable. You should respect and acknowledge your seniors (that is why we have rank belts). There should be different levels of communcation between the ranks.

Please take into account the number of "QUACKS" floating aroung boasting themselfs, their sects, and cult mentality...use discretion...it should be fairly evadent the reason why your instructor does what he/se does!

Please afford me your comments!

TAEKWON!
SPooKeY
 

Miles

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Good thread!

When entering the training area of the dojang, we place our right hand over our heart before stepping onto the mat. If class is started, the tardy student waits for the instructor's signal before coming onto the mat-they are lined up in the back regardless of rank until the first break after which the lines will be reformed.

Before class, when a junior student greets a more senior student, the junior extends his/her right hand w/left hand under right elbow-there is a handshake and bow. This is repeated at the end of our class as well when the guep students approach and bow out to the dan students.

During class, if a senior dan rank arrives at the dojang, we stop class and bow as a group. Generally the senior on the floor claps twice or calls "chareyot."

During class when a new technique/combination/is announced, as a group we say "yes sir/madame."

If one's dobok or dee get disheveled, they are to turn away from everyone and fix themselves quickly. I mention this because if someone is disheveled, it is disrespectful to force your dojang-mates to watch you fix yourself.

If students are paired up against each other for any drill, they are called to attention and bow to each other.

At the end of class, if something new was worked on, a milestone achieved, or if someone had a break-through class, we clap for them. We salute the flags, bow to the seniors, and do the bow/handshake for the dans.

Interested in learning others' experiences in etiquette. BTW, the Korea TKD Association had a Code of Etiquette that was very detailed (down to where you stand/sit/drive with a senior).

Miles
 

Yeti

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RIGHT BEHIND YOU!!!
Miles said:
Before class, when a junior student greets a more senior student, the junior extends his/her right hand w/left hand under right elbow-there is a handshake and bow. This is repeated at the end of our class as well when the guep students approach and bow out to the dan students.

During class, if a senior dan rank arrives at the dojang, we stop class and bow as a group. Generally the senior on the floor claps twice or calls "chareyot."

During class when a new technique/combination/is announced, as a group we say "yes sir/madame."

If one's dobok or dee get disheveled, they are to turn away from everyone and fix themselves quickly. I mention this because if someone is disheveled, it is disrespectful to force your dojang-mates to watch you fix yourself.

If students are paired up against each other for any drill, they are called to attention and bow to each other.

At the end of class, if something new was worked on, a milestone achieved, or if someone had a break-through class, we clap for them. We salute the flags, bow to the seniors, and do the bow/handshake for the dans.


Miles
We do all of this the same way as Miles described. Also, if we worked with partners (say it was an SD week), at the end of class we will find our partner, bow, shake hands and say "Good Job" in Korean (forgive me, I can't spell it!!).
 
OP
S

Spookey

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Dear Guys,

Thanks for your additions..I hope more will include theres...

Another example of the military ("martial") mentality was offered. The shaking of hands in such a manor (with the left hand under the right elbow/forearm, or gripping the right forearm) serves two purposes. One, it shows both hands in plain sight so as to know that you are not holding a weapon. Two, it provides an immediate defensive measure against attack.

We are speaking of a Korean art that derives from Korean culture...a culture that is often volitile as the "Land of the Morning Calm" has been anything but that for over a century. Not a generation ago the President of that great country was assasinated by his Chief of Security.

Regarding the Oh Do Kwan specifically...the soldiers/students (as it was not a civilian gym) would physically offer a military salute as opposed to a bow!

TAEKWON!
SPooKeY
 
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