Punching bag question

ceaer

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I'm sure this comes up a lot, I did a search but couldn't find exactly what I was looking for.

I'm planning on getting a free standing bag as there is no where I could put a hanging one. I'm planning on getting a century wavemaster xxl, which I understand is probably the best free standing option.

My questions:
Approximately how much space would it require? I'm thinking at least a 6' by 6' area to allow for proper distancing and space to move around. Does that seem right or am I underestimating drastically?

My house is kind of crowded, so I'm trying to work out where I could fit it and my parents aren't going to want it in the living room or anything like that; I could probably fit it in the basement if we shifted things around, or in my room. Which leads to another question: my room is on the 2nd floor. Would it be too noisy to have it there? I understand that even the best free standing bags slide or rock at least a bit and if it sounds like a buffalo stampede in my room my parents will not be happy.

Summary: how much space would I need and would it be too noisy to have it on the 2nd floor?

I appreciate all replies (and apologize if this has been covered ad nauseum)!
 

punisher73

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Depends on how you want to use your heavy bag. If you want it to move around alot and work on footwork etc. then the minimum space around it is going to be a 6 foot circle around the bag (and make sure that if the bag swings way out that it does not hit any furniture etc. If you only want to work punches and combos only some people attack a heavy weight and bungee cord to the bottom so it does not swing much and pretty much stays in place, this will allow you to have a much smaller work area.

I would say that having it on the second floor is going to be very noisy. Not only from you hitting it, but from moving around on the floor working it as well.
 
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ceaer

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That's about what I thought, thanks. It's going to be harder to find the space in the basement though, oh well.
 

tallgeese

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Generally, I'd agree with what's been said. 2nd floor will almost certainly be too noisy. Space is always an issue for a bag at home it seems.

Less than ideal space can still work within limitations, you just have to accept them and work with them.

The basement is probably the way to go.
 

bowser666

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Well you can always add moving it around to your exercise routine and move it outside in the garage, backyard, patio etc.... and work out outdoors ? Yeah it is not as easy as having it in one place all the time but nothing wrong with breaking a sweat before your workout officially begins :) That will at least work for when it is not wintertime :)
 

BLACK LION

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I'm sure this comes up a lot, I did a search but couldn't find exactly what I was looking for.

I'm planning on getting a free standing bag as there is no where I could put a hanging one. I'm planning on getting a century wavemaster xxl, which I understand is probably the best free standing option.

My questions:
Approximately how much space would it require? I'm thinking at least a 6' by 6' area to allow for proper distancing and space to move around. Does that seem right or am I underestimating drastically?

My house is kind of crowded, so I'm trying to work out where I could fit it and my parents aren't going to want it in the living room or anything like that; I could probably fit it in the basement if we shifted things around, or in my room. Which leads to another question: my room is on the 2nd floor. Would it be too noisy to have it there? I understand that even the best free standing bags slide or rock at least a bit and if it sounds like a buffalo stampede in my room my parents will not be happy.

Summary: how much space would I need and would it be too noisy to have it on the 2nd floor?

I appreciate all replies (and apologize if this has been covered ad nauseum)!


Well there are several factors...

I am assuming that free standing means it has its own stand so you dont have to locate a frame stud and hang it.

These types of set ups are noisy... and if it is a wavemaster it will be water filled... no bueno for 2nd floor.... You may have to use weights to keep it from moving and once you get used to it the thing will be swinging all over the place... 6' x 6' is tight but if that is all you have to go with then oh well...

one thing I dont fancy about the bags that have a stand is they limit attack angles to the sides not covered by the stand so you dont get a full 360 deg attack spectrum... full body hanging bags are wonderful...

You could always try a BOB and wrap a mat around the stand for lower kicks....
 

Laurentkd

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I recently bought a wavemaster xxl for my apartment. It seems several replies here think the bag will swing, instead it actually sits on a base and doesn't move.

I have mine against a wall most of the time, so I can still hit 3 sides of it when I am just looking to throw a few kicks. I only have to have a couple feet around it free to do that. Then I pull it into the middle of the room when I want to work all the way around it, but really need a lot of room for that. Overall, it works well to allow me to do something when I am not at my martial arts school.

As far as noise go, the only noise and movement you are going to have is the actual sound of hitting the bag. So I don't know if the floor you have it on would really matter, although your basement is probably farther away from your parents' ears.

You will have to be careful to not knock it over if you don't have a lot of room, but that generally only happens when you are intentionally trying to kick it over, like with a side kick or back kick (at least for 125 lb me!).

I enjoy having mine!
 
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ceaer

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I recently bought a wavemaster xxl for my apartment. It seems several replies here think the bag will swing, instead it actually sits on a base and doesn't move.

I have mine against a wall most of the time, so I can still hit 3 sides of it when I am just looking to throw a few kicks. I only have to have a couple feet around it free to do that. Then I pull it into the middle of the room when I want to work all the way around it, but really need a lot of room for that. Overall, it works well to allow me to do something when I am not at my martial arts school.

As far as noise go, the only noise and movement you are going to have is the actual sound of hitting the bag. So I don't know if the floor you have it on would really matter, although your basement is probably farther away from your parents' ears.

You will have to be careful to not knock it over if you don't have a lot of room, but that generally only happens when you are intentionally trying to kick it over, like with a side kick or back kick (at least for 125 lb me!).

I enjoy having mine!


Great info, thanks! It's always good to hear from personal experience.
 

blindsage

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I personally can't stand wavemaster (or other) free standing style bags. To easy to rock, make a lot of noise, some of them you can kick straight through the padding and feel the post. If I was going to set up a bag where I couldn't hang one from the ceiling, I'd get one of those bag stands like this and use an actual heavy bag. But you do need a little space for them.
 

padre

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In my limited experience, the freestanding bags don't take as much punishment as I'd like. (limited = "broke it")

They are a little noisy, but such is the nature of kicking and punching pretty much anything. It's not the bag that's noisy, but the activity itself.

I think 6' is really tight, personally, but it wouldn't be fair to say that the space limitation would render the bag useless.

What sort of practice do you have in mind?
 

Skpotamus

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Your best bet is to get a hanging bag and put it in the basement, IMHO.

Everlast makes a metal bracket that bolts to two floor joists to spread out the weight and impact ( http://www.karatedepot.com/tr-bg-32.html ), I mounted that up in my basement, and got a heavy bag spring from combat sports international ( http://www.combatsports.com/prodinfo.asp?number=HDHBS ), then hung my 120lb thai bag from it. The spring takes the impact away from the joists enough that my wife has been directly above me while I'm working out and she can hardly tell.

Freestanding bags will move around a lot, and you can knock them over pretty easily once you start to develop some power in your kicks. I've seen 160lb boxers move an XXL filled with sand around with their punches.
 
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ceaer

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In my limited experience, the freestanding bags don't take as much punishment as I'd like. (limited = "broke it")

They are a little noisy, but such is the nature of kicking and punching pretty much anything. It's not the bag that's noisy, but the activity itself.

I think 6' is really tight, personally, but it wouldn't be fair to say that the space limitation would render the bag useless.

What sort of practice do you have in mind?

I was using 6' by 6' as a guideline, that's how much clear floor space I have right now. I could clear up a few more feet by shifting things around, but if I need a lot more room I'd have to look into other options, which is why I asked for space estimates.

I'm not planning anything too fancy, just working on drills and combos from class. Basic punches, palm strikes, ridgehands, hammer strikes; thrust kick, roundhouse, side kick, back kick, hook and axe. Just working on timing and distancing and building up some power. My kicks especially could use some work and I hate practicing them in the air.

I'm not worried about breaking it, my friend has a similar bag that I've used a few times and I simply don't have the power right now to really beat on it.
 
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ceaer

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Your best bet is to get a hanging bag and put it in the basement, IMHO.

Everlast makes a metal bracket that bolts to two floor joists to spread out the weight and impact ( http://www.karatedepot.com/tr-bg-32.html ), I mounted that up in my basement, and got a heavy bag spring from combat sports international ( http://www.combatsports.com/prodinfo.asp?number=HDHBS ), then hung my 120lb thai bag from it. The spring takes the impact away from the joists enough that my wife has been directly above me while I'm working out and she can hardly tell.

Freestanding bags will move around a lot, and you can knock them over pretty easily once you start to develop some power in your kicks. I've seen 160lb boxers move an XXL filled with sand around with their punches.

My parents would not allow that and there is absolutely no space for it even if they would allow it, my basement has pipes all over the ceiling.
 

BLACK LION

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So its not the swinging type, its the type that has a stand that you fill with sand or water?

The stand types are easy to kick over once you get the hang of it...as stated above. When I was training muay thai with Surachais' son I could kick them over with around 35% power.

Hint... trees are free and they dont move as much. They also help you refine your kicks around bone as bags do not... they are hard in parts that dont get kicked much but do not simulate bone.

Good luck in your venture.
 

Skpotamus

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If you can't get a hanger like the one I listed, then you will probably have to go with a wavemaster xxl. If you can kick at all, you'll be able to knock it over pretty easily. Even filled with sand (250lbs worth), I move mine around when just working hand combo's on it.

For working on your kicks, I'd get an old heavy bag and lean it against something solid (wall, tree, etc) so you can kick it.

Your absolute best bet would be to get a buddy and some thai pads, you'll be able to throw full power hand, elbow and knee techs, as well as angular kicks (round kicks, etc) with no problems, get a belly pad for linear kicks and you'll be set.
 
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