overweight has afected my life

Manny

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Sorry if this post is something sad but I need to share this with you mis amigos.My weight problems began turning my 20's, I 've been a big eater since my teen years but exercise always kept me fit. I was finishing college and my eforts were towards graduation and slowly started skip classes till I quit TKD, those days were of parties,sex and mmmm some alcohol too. Then in 1994 I got married and since I've been gaining weight, in 16 years of marriage I got 50+ pounds.

Since I returned TKD 3 years back my loss weight is minimal, I hate the word diet and the times I've been on diet I have lost 10-15 punds and no more and then the rebound.

Today, surfing in the internet I saw the pic of a 3rd degree black belt guy about my age performing a nice side kick and then I feel the pain, oh my lord!!! I tought, if I only could do a nice kick like that!!

My over weight took me to the problem of my feet and the hurting condiction of every step I do, this also keep me away from training and then I can not drop some bacon.

Somehow that pic stung me in the pride and I know what I have to do in order to improve my kicks, it's going to be dificult very dificult, something almost impossible but I need to do something I love TKD and need to improve myself.

Manny
 

bluekey88

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Hang in there Manny. Im in the same.boat as you. Its not easy. However, the real secret sauce is persistence. Just trying...and then trying again, even when you have a set back. Finding the right eating plan and exercise regime....and then trying something else if.they don't work....it all boils.down to persistence. The results will come as long as you keep trying.

Peace,
Erik
 

girlbug2

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Manny I do sympathize with a stubborn weight problem as I am sure many others here do as well.

Dont' give up! There is a man in his late 60s who joined Krav Maga about the time I started 2 and 1/2 years ago. At first his weight and various joint problems kept him from participating much in the exercise and cardio portions of class, but after a time he put some real effort into it and got some personal training on the side, changed his diet as well. In about 6 months time he dropped his excess weight and was in such great shape that he could outdo me, 30 years younger! He now sports a six pack, can you believe it. I'd say from the look of it that he lost about 80 lbs of fat altogether although I have not asked.

It's never too late.

Please do not be discouraged--whatever diet did not work for you in the past, it's time to try something different. Keep trying until you discover an eating plan which you can stick to long term.
 

Sukerkin

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I'm in a similar boat, mate :(. Since I packed in smoking and settled down in the same year, I have steadily gained weight having been a consistent 11-12 stone all my life.

It has got to such a pass that my friends have taken to ribbing me about how fat I've gotten and, even more importantly, it is affecting my Iai. We do quite a bit of getting up from awkward seated/kneeling positions on the floor and a lot of moving about on our knees. When you are carrying a ton of exces mass that is not fun at all :(.

It is not helped by the fact that my missus is an old-fashioned lass and would be most offended if I tried to fend for myself on the cooking front (as I have done for the 30 years prior) - why this is a problem is that she feeds me as if I was 7' 6"! Hence the waistline :eek:.

Persistence is indeed the key and raising the energy output will have an effect in the end I am sure.
 

bluewaveschool

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Tell your wife she has to change the cooking habits because it's not healthy for either of you. My wife has started cooking better for us, it's helped a little. I still have portion control issues with certain favorite foods though.

Manny, something that has been a big help to me, is practicing my kicks in water. My YMCA has a warm water (about 85ish degrees F, not hot tub type heat) that they do a lot of arthritis classes in, I find it fantastic for kicking. Since the water isn't hot, you can stay in it without worry. Since the water isn't cold, you don't have to worry about cramps. I do stretching then work kicks, mostly the 3 basics. It gives resistance without any stress on joints. I think it would be easier on your feet. It's GREAT for working on your technique, as the water slows you down you watch your foot position and how you are chambering.
 

IcemanSK

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I can relate a bit, Manny. Two years ago I tore my calf muscle & gained a lot of weight. I could teach, but barely train myself. It took a year for that to heal. Within a month of that healing, I injured my back. As that healed, I tore my calf again!:barf:

I ate like it didn't matter that I couldn't train & gained nearly 40 lbs! (Yes folks who met me at the Instructor's Course in Chicago, I gained 15 lbs more after we met!) This May, my wife suggested that we both go on Weight Watchers. So, while still in a cast & unable to train, I started the program. I was in a cast for the first 6 weeks of the program & I lost 9 lbs! Since then, I've lost 38+ lbs! My calf is healed up, I'm back running & my back is healing.

Changing the way we eat is really hard! But it is key to loosing weight. I encourage you my friend. I know it's hard, but it is possible.

All my best to you!
 

Carol

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Weight watchers is a really good program. Its what helped me drop my 20 at the beginning of the year. Now I have to get back on it so I drop 20 more :D

Congrats on your success Tom!
 

David43515

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Just don`t give up Manny. Like others said, the most important thing is to stick with it. Even if you only lose a pound a week, that`s still 52 pounds a year!
 

andyjeffries

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Since I returned TKD 3 years back my loss weight is minimal, I hate the word diet and the times I've been on diet I have lost 10-15 punds and no more and then the rebound. Somehow that pic stung me in the pride and I know what I have to do in order to improve my kicks, it's going to be dificult very dificult, something almost impossible but I need to do something I love TKD and need to improve myself.

Hey Manny,

I just wanted to let you know I'm another in the same boat, but I think a lot worse. I'm about 100 pounds overweight! In the past 8 weeks I've lost about 20 pound so I'm heading in the right direction, but it took a while to pile on so much weight so it'll take a while to come off again.

I'm happy if I lose 1-2lb per week (it's not healthy to lose more than that as the skin doesn't get a chance to contract quickly enough). If I stay the same on the odd week I don't get too down about it (it's better than when it's gone up at previous points in my life).

The big change for me has been in my diet. How I've found works for me is the help of one drug and one "herbal" remedy, but also to try and make better choices. I haven't given up any foods, I haven't suddenly limited myself to 2000 calories per day, I haven't fasted.

What I've done is try to think "I want a snack, instead of my normal bar of chocolate though I'll have a banana and see if that settles it... no, OK, add in a cereal bar... ahh that's better". Sometimes just the banana works, sometimes just a drink of water or orange squash (I guess the closest thing is cordial in America, you guys don't really have orange squash) works. But either way, I'm just tweaking the choices I make and it's making a huge difference.

In terms of the drug I've been taking Orlistat for about the same period and also Green Coffee capsules. Orlistat stops your body absorbing all the fat you take in, Green Coffee increases your metabolism and stops your body absorbing all the carbs you take in. I don't know what the key is - orlistat, green coffee or diet choices - but for me it's working.

I'm very lucky in that I have a very supportive Master and Grandmaster who look at me for someone that's changing my body shape positively and look at my technique/ability rather than my size. I hope you also have this support.

Anyway, best of luck in your struggle - I just felt I wanted to open up a little to show you that you're not alone...

Cheers,


Andy
 

Bruno@MT

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Since I returned TKD 3 years back my loss weight is minimal, I hate the word diet and the times I've been on diet I have lost 10-15 punds and no more and then the rebound.

A diet is not something you do for a while and then revert to your old lifestyle. Your old lifestyle is what made you overweight in the first place. No matter how low your weight drops, go back to the lifestyle and you'll go back to the weight.

A book I can personally advise you is 'good calories, bad calories' by Taubes.
That will tell you lots of useful things.
 

Bruno@MT

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In terms of the drug I've been taking Orlistat for about the same period and also Green Coffee capsules. Orlistat stops your body absorbing all the fat you take in, Green Coffee increases your metabolism and stops your body absorbing all the carbs you take in. I don't know what the key is - orlistat, green coffee or diet choices - but for me it's working.

Actually, most of your body fat is due to carbohydrates (starches and fat) and not dietary fat. Dietary fat digestion is a very slow and continuous system. Carbohydrates are like the nitro button on drag racers.

If you want to lose weight by dropping the most unhealthy and caloric thing from your diet, then sugars and starches are where you should cut, and no so much in the fats.

The added benefit of removing starches is also that you get much less hungry. Hunger (for people like us, i.e. not famished or ill) is what happens when your body runs out of carbs and has not yet kicked the fat metabolism into gear. If your fat metabloism is already doing its job, you won't get hungry so quick. And when you do, it's more a gradual thing, rather than the growling stomach experience.
 

Jade Tigress

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Actually, most of your body fat is due to carbohydrates (starches and fat) and not dietary fat. Dietary fat digestion is a very slow and continuous system. Carbohydrates are like the nitro button on drag racers.

If you want to lose weight by dropping the most unhealthy and caloric thing from your diet, then sugars and starches are where you should cut, and no so much in the fats.

The added benefit of removing starches is also that you get much less hungry. Hunger (for people like us, i.e. not famished or ill) is what happens when your body runs out of carbs and has not yet kicked the fat metabolism into gear. If your fat metabloism is already doing its job, you won't get hungry so quick. And when you do, it's more a gradual thing, rather than the growling stomach experience.

Great post Bruno. :) I need to change my eating habits. Remembering the above will help with making food choices when I'm feeling "famished".

Hang in there Manny. It is incredibly frustrating when you want to be in one place and you're in another. Set realistic goals for yourself. As others have said, it's not healthy to lose more than about 2 pounds a week. Try using a smaller plate at mealtime to help with portion control. Perhaps consult a nutritionist to help with changing your eating habits.

Good luck and keep us posted. :asian:
 

Bruno@MT

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I have experimented with this myself, and it is indeed true.

For example, if I just eat 2 baked eggs (baked in butter) and a piece of cheese in the morning, I won't get hungry until well into noon. If I eat the same thing between a couple of sandwiches, then my stomach starts growling by 11am, even though I ate more!

Same with my lunches. Usually I cook my work lunch the day before. I bake some chicken or meatloaf, add mushrooms, celery, paprika, a small onion, some spices, ... If I have that for lunch, then I can make it to a late diner without getting really hungry. If I have a big club sandwich, then I get really hungry by 5PM.

And as you can imagine, not snacking is much easier if you're not feeling hungry. The one thing you notice initially is that after eating, you get a taste for something sugary. The reason is that over the years, your body has gotten used to the insulin spike immediately after eating. If there isn't one, then initially you feel like something is missing.

Contrary to what you might think, fatty foods do not contribute as dramatic to body weight as starches. With carbs, you get a glucose overdose in your blood, followed by the insulin spike. The part of glucose that cannot get used gets stored as fat. And when the blood sugar is gone, you get really hungry. One of the reasons you don't get as hungry with fatty foods is that your fat metabolism is already running in gear. By the time your dietary fats run out, your body starts using body fats without too much changeover. And because fat gets converted to blood sugar very slowly, you can eat fatty food without causing much fat storage. there simply won't be anything in your blood to store.

It's the bun of the hotdog that causes problems, not the meat.
 
OP
Manny

Manny

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Thank you all for been suppoertive, I see I am not the only one here with the same problem, this weeken will do make aqreview of my eating problems and will try to find a solution.

My wife cooks healthy I must say, my problem is that maybe I eat starches and some sugar (not to many), and other problem are the size of the meals so I will try to show you how is a tipical day for me.

Breakfast, usually at 9 am a sandwich and a can of coke.
12:00 p.m. some chips or peanuts as snack.
3:00 p.m. the principal meal I star with a bowl of soup and then el guisado that could be meat,chicken or fish (the problem is I repeat), tortillas not always.
At night maybe scramble eggs with tortillas and water lots of water or maybe one or two ham and cheese sandwihs.

I eat some vegetables, not many, and fruits I don't like them.

Yestardat y have a large meal (2 pm) consisting of starches and soda so at night I felt like a ballon so I eat to go to bead just an apple and a couple of peaches and alot of water.

I have to make some changes, more vegetables like letuce,tomatoes, or perhaps boiled vegetables too and less bread,mayo,ham,cheese (O lord I love the cheese),tortillas,etc.

I am going to make a diet plan and more exercise if feet allow me.

Manny
 

CoryKS

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Weight loss can be hard, but the hardest part is starting. Also, make it as easy for yourself as you can. Take the time to research how your body uses the food you give it and you can avoid making mistakes that will sabotage your efforts. Work smarter, not harder. Good luck!
 

StudentCarl

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Manny,
It is said that 1 in 100 persevere in training to earn a black belt. I think it will take the same or greater commitment, every day, for you to change your body in this way.

When you study a martial art, you train with a master who reshapes your mind and body.

You should treat this the same as training in a new martial art: find a master and follow their guidance each day. Expect it to take years before you are truly changed, as a black belt is a different person from the white belt who began.

To start this will require you to have the open mind of a white belt and trust in a master.

Best wishes,
Carl
 

risingfire

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Manny,
One sentence:
Get the lap-band!!!

It worked for me. I weighed 370 pounds, 2 years later. 156pounds. Best thing ever!
 

Sukerkin

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It should be said tho' that such operations are not risk-free and can have irreversible long term negative consequences.

Far better to try the 'conventional' methods if things are not already at life/health-threatening levels.
 

Nomad

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I hear you, Manny, and can relate. By 30, I'd reached 265 lbs through poor eating habits and lack of exercise.

What has worked for me in the long term has been changing my habits, not dieting per se. Making conscious decisions to eat healthier, learning what my daily calorie intake should be, and increasing my daily exercise, originally through martial arts, then adding some weights and interval training.

At my fittest, I made it back down to 185... since then through some chronic injuries and letting bad habits back in, I'm back to about 210 (my wedding weight at age 22, so still not too bad!).

I'm ramping things up again, because I really liked fitting into my skinny clothes. The injuries appear to have abated, so I'm following the same plan as before... ramping up the exercise (particularly the intensity rather than the duration), and cutting back on my caloric intake. Saw the scale dip below 210 for the first time in several months today, so am feeling good about it at the moment. I'm wanting to get back down to ~180 and stay there for awhile.

If you don't have it, a great resource for this is "The Fighter's Body; an owner's manual". This explains everything in plain language, and helps you put together an easy to follow and stick to plan.

Good luck!
 

risingfire

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Yes the lap-band does have its risks, but if used properly as the tool its supposed to be and not a crutch it can save your life. It is light years ahead of gastric, and the mortality rate is "almost" non existent(no dumping syndrome, etc.). I had it done and was home 3 hours later walking around the block. All they do is squeeze the plumbing a bit, they do not rearrange it; it is fully reversible as well. With all things there is danger, with the lap-band, the risk is SO small compared to the rewards though! I of course say try EVERYTHING before surgery, but if it doesn't work, then by all means explore this option! Remember, only a small % of people who diet or make a "lifestyle change," stick with it for the rest of their lives. I am not trying to demotivate, all I am saying is you may fall into that category of those who yo-yo or whatever like I did give the band a look!
 
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