Least favorite kicks

Flying Crane

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That actually makes sense. :asian:

It's not usually trained that way in TKD, from what I've seen, but it should be. Good observation!

In kenpo, we train the back kick in several ways. This includes a crossing back kick to bridge distance and add momentum to the kick; a spinning back kick; a kick where you turn away from the opponent to line it up and kick, which I suspect may have been what you were thinking of. But the most basic way is simple from a relaxed standing position as a defense against someone who crept up behind you. This assumes you were not expecting a fight, you were taken by surprise, and are not in any type of fighting stance. Just raise up the foot and fire it straight back into the knee, leg, or groin.

With regards to the crossing back kick, we prefer it to the crossing side kick. Same with the spinning back kick vs. spinning side kick. For the crossing back kick we feel that by turning the body a bit further than you do in the side kick, you are lining up your hips in a better way, that leads to both a more powerful kick and less chance of injuring your hips. Just make sure your toe is pointing at the ground and your hips are absolutely square to the opponent, regardless of what kind of back kick you are doing.

I used to not feel as strongly about the back kick, but once these little details were pointed out to me, I felt some immediate improvements and I really like the kick.

Give it a whirl, take it for a test drive and see what you think.
 

Joab

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What are some of your lease favorite kicks and why?

Any high kick, because they really arn't practical for self defense. Hit high, kick low, your hands are high hit high, your feet are low, kick low. This is merely logical, practical, common sense. High kicks are flashy, if your into being flashy kick high, if you attack me please kick high...!
 

exile

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In kenpo, we train the back kick in several ways. This includes a crossing back kick to bridge distance and add momentum to the kick; a spinning back kick; a kick where you turn away from the opponent to line it up and kick, which I suspect may have been what you were thinking of. But the most basic way is simple from a relaxed standing position as a defense against someone who crept up behind you. This assumes you were not expecting a fight, you were taken by surprise, and are not in any type of fighting stance. Just raise up the foot and fire it straight back into the knee, leg, or groin.

With regards to the crossing back kick, we prefer it to the crossing side kick. Same with the spinning back kick vs. spinning side kick. For the crossing back kick we feel that by turning the body a bit further than you do in the side kick, you are lining up your hips in a better way, that leads to both a more powerful kick and less chance of injuring your hips. Just make sure your toe is pointing at the ground and your hips are absolutely square to the opponent, regardless of what kind of back kick you are doing.

I used to not feel as strongly about the back kick, but once these little details were pointed out to me, I felt some immediate improvements and I really like the kick.

Give it a whirl, take it for a test drive and see what you think.

I will, and thanks again!

In TKD—at least, this has been my experience—the back kick is taught as a technique applied to someone standing in front of you. In a left-lead foot fighting stance, you pivot both feet clockwise, and quickly turn your head clockwise as well, to keep at least peripheral vision awareness of the attacker, rotate 180繙 away from him, and strike out mid-body height with your right leg (which you've probably chambered briefly prior to the strike). I find real psychological barriers to turning away from the attacker that way, even knowing that it's just to set up a hard strike to their torso... it just feels like giving up too much control. The idea of training it as a weapon against someone who approaches you from behind makes a lot more sense, in term of our conditioning not to give your attacker any undefended openings.
 

Flying Crane

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I will, and thanks again!

In TKDat least, this has been my experiencethe back kick is taught as a technique applied to someone standing in front of you. In a left-lead foot fighting stance, you pivot both feet clockwise, and quickly turn your head clockwise as well, to keep at least peripheral vision awareness of the attacker, rotate 180繙 away from him, and strike out mid-body height with your right leg (which you've probably chambered briefly prior to the strike). I find real psychological barriers to turning away from the attacker that way, even knowing that it's just to set up a hard strike to their torso... it just feels like giving up too much control. The idea of training it as a weapon against someone who approaches you from behind makes a lot more sense, in term of our conditioning not to give your attacker any undefended openings.

Yes, we have that version as well, it's the one I was trying to describe as turning away to line up the kick. I think it can be good to use against someone who is rushing you. You turn away, he thinks you are retreating, and you fire the kick in low and hard under his guard. But it is a little tricky getting the same kind of power because you are turning away but then need to drive power forward. You are changing directions like that, and that takes a bit of work to figure out how to be effective.

but yeah, it ought to be kind of obvious, at least from a self defense perspective, kick BACK against an opponent BEHIND you...
 

ynnad

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The front kick. Booorrring...

I'm sure this has been mentioned before, but is there anyone who can perform the "flashy" high spinning kicks who does not like them? I know I'll not be using them in a self defense scenario, but they are fun. I want to learn as much as I can. They are also fun in sparring even though I get nailed sometimes because they make you vulnerable.

I love when we practice kicks that are out of our league. It is fun. We are a bunch of bozos out there falling down getting embarrassed. It keeps us humble and builds comradery.
 

SJON

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Hey Bob,

think of the back kick as something to use against someone who has sneaked up behind you, or otherwise gotten himself there. I understand not wanting to turn your back on an oppononent, but maybe he got behind you in some other way. Now nail him.

Hmmm ... now that you mention it, I remember an ATM moment some years ago ... knee height ... yes, indeed.
 

searcher

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Hmmm ... now that you mention it, I remember an ATM moment some years ago ... knee height ... yes, indeed.


No, no, no. You are thinking to high with the application of the back kick. Insteps, my brothers an sisters. They are perfect for the use of the back kick. Afterall, the back kick and side kick are just elevated stomps.
 

Aefibird

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I dislike any kick that requires me to spin or to jump (especially jump). My knees don't like them, they're no good for self-defence and I'd never want to use them in tournament sparring.

When done well I like watching them, though, and admire people that have the physical ability to pull off such good moves.

I also don't like in-to-out crescent kick as it makes my hips hurt.
 

Miles

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The twist kick. I love watching highly skilled folks do them: GM Kwang Jo Choi and GM HC Hwang come readily to mind. But I still think they are impractical....
 

Bill Mattocks

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My least favorite kick so far is fumi komi, but I also have trouble with otoshi geri. I have difficulty opening up my hips and turning it over, particularly with the left. I always have the feeling I am about to hear two small but important round things hit the floor and roll away...so sad.
 

IcemanSK

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I've never been one for Jump side kicks. I come from very "grounded" people.
 

searcher

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The twist kick. I love watching highly skilled folks do them: GM Kwang Jo Choi and GM HC Hwang come readily to mind. But I still think they are impractical....


Come on Miles, the twist kick? It is a wonderful alternative to the crescent kick. I used many a moon ago in my 1st Dan test with high success. Broke My Father's cheekbones with it.
 

Sylo

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Any kick with my right leg.

Double kicks.

they seem ineffective.
 

CDKJudoka

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Multiple kicks, striking on the same plane. My balance isn't what it used to be and one of the forms that I have to do involves a cross-behind hook kick followed by 3 side kicks pretty much striking the same target. I have a difficult time maintaining balance rechambering the hook kick and then throwing a full power series of side kicks.

That and tornado kicks.
 

firerex

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to be honest i like pretty much every kick there is, i dont always use them but im always up to learning new things, during sparring however i dont want to do a flying side kick spin side kick (although thats like my favorite kick) because it could really hurt someone
 

dancingalone

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Double kicks.
they seem ineffective.

It's a good sport adaptation for point tournaments. As a training tool, they help you build strength and recoil speed. You're right that double kicks are fairly ineffective for the street.
 
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