is Daito-Ryu Aikijujutsu street effective?

MAN527

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I want to join Aikijujutsu i have seen some videos and i find the art amazing , i will be joining the Spartan Dojo in Cliffside Park,NJ . I just want to know if this art is effective in a street setting , i only ask cause i will be becoming a police officer soon and want to know if this art would be good to use on the street ?
 

Jai

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Yes it is. I was teaching TKD sparring for a guy a while back who specialized in Aikijujutsu. The art is every bit as useful as it is amazing as you say. Worst case, you try it and it's not for you. Best case, you try it and it's a perfect fit for what you want :)
 

stone_dragone

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First off...greetings and welcome to MT! Why don't you head on over to the Meet and greet section and introduce yourself!

Second...I would think that Aikijutsu will probably serve you well in the LEO line of work, but there are several LEOs on this forum that could help you.

Third...MODs...I think this would do better in the General Martial Arts forum.
 

theletch1

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DRAJJ is a very effective art. It's the base art for several other forms of martial arts and we have a couple highly qualified instructors for this art on the board.

Stone Dragone..thanks for the heads up on the move. Remember that you can (and should) hit the triangle RTM button in the upper right hand corner of the post to notify the mods of anything that you feel needs our attention.
 

tshadowchaser

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Yes it is a great art and I think you would like it.
Let us know if you join and how your training goes

Welcome to MT
 

howard

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Hi,

IMO the short answer is yes, Daito-ryu can be very effective in real situations.

I train at the Cliffside Park dojo that you mentioned. There is a NJ state trooper there who has been training in Daito-ryu for a long time. Perhaps you could talk to him to get an informed perspective on Daito-ryu's applicability to law enforcement.

Have you stopped by to observe a class? If you could make it on a Saturday, the class is four hours (10:30 - 2:30) and is very comprehensive. A Saturday class would give you a great idea of what to expect. Also, the Daito-ryu instructor is a very accessible guy who would be happy to talk to you about any questions you have about the art and the training. His knowledge of Japanese martial arts is enormous.

Good luck, and maybe I'll see you in Cliffside Park soon (currenty recovering from an injury), hope to be back on the mat sometime next week).

ps - just wanted to add that my injury was not training-related. The Daito-ryu training is safe.
 

jks9199

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Many martial arts, including most forms of jujitsu, have applicability to law enforcement. However, there's a big caveat... To reach a street effective level in most of them takes dedicated practice and time. The handful of techniques selected in most Police Defensive Tactics programs that I've either reviewed or been taught are kind of generic, and direct. That's not surprising; there's just too much to be taught in the short time of the academy. I strongly encourage you to commit to some martial art program, especially one that's NOT aimed primarily at sports. Unfortunately, most commercial schools cater to kids and hobbyists, not those who'll need to use it regularly and for real.

But there are really plenty of threads on these topics; use the search function, especially in the General Self Defense section.

Take a look at the dojo; see what you think. Is it something that you'll do and continue to do? Do the instructors seem knowledgable and interested in teaching? Who actually teaches the newer students? In many cases, you'll find that it's senior students, not the "name" that owns the dojo. This isn't automatically a bad thing, it's just something to be aware of. It doesn't take a master instructor to teach a newbie... And... is it located somewhere that you'll actually go, regularly, and can you afford it? (These last two are actually major drivers, really... because if you won't go, or can't pay, there's no point in sweating the rest of it!)
 
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MAN527

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i just want to thank everyone who helped me with my questions everyone was very helpful and respectful thank you all i really appriate it .
 
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