Internal Arts Represented Here

Which Internal Art do YOU study?

  • Xingyiquan (Shanxi, Honan, Hubei, etc.)

    Votes: 25 28.4%
  • Taijiquan (Chen, Yang, Sun, Wu, Hao/Wu, etc.)

    Votes: 48 54.5%
  • Baguazhang (pick a style, any style!)

    Votes: 33 37.5%
  • Liuhebafa

    Votes: 4 4.5%
  • Yiliquan

    Votes: 7 8.0%
  • Other

    Votes: 21 23.9%
  • Not Applicable

    Votes: 8 9.1%

  • Total voters
    88
  • Poll closed .
Arts decended from the 3 orthodox arts:

Yiquan
Liu Ba He Fa

There's not enough documentation to exactly tell where LHBF comes from.

But it is quite certain the LHBF originally started out as the twelve animals of LHBF, which does not seem to have descended from any of the 3 orthodox arts.
 
Also a note on Yiquan (aka dachengquan), it comes directly from Xingyi.


It was founded by a Chinese xingyiquan master, Wang Xiangzhai

Wang came to the conclusion that xingyiquan was often taught wrong, putting too much emphasis on external, neglecting the internal which he considered the essence of true martial power
 
Hello everyone, I'm new to this site.

Anyway, I do Xingyi, Bagua, and Yiquan as of right now. I really like all three of them, I don't think I have a favorite. I guess I just figured I would post here and sort of introduce myself a bit. I've been doing these arts for about three to four months now, and I've previously dabbled in Hapkido and Jeet Kune Do. Where I'm from, there aren't very many MA oppurtunities, besides: Aikido, Karate, Hapkido, JKD, To-ShinDo, and Tai Chi.
Okay, I guess thats more then some, but most of those dojos are too far away from me, and driving there every week would kill me gas wise, and most of them are really expensive as it is. So instead I go to this guy who lives about thirty five minutes away from me who teaches Xingyi, Bagua, and Yiquan. And so far, I like it a lot better then Hapkido or JKD.
 
Unsung Hero,
Welcome to MT!! Good to have some more internal CMA people here. I look forward to reading your posts.

7sm
 
Unsung Hero said:
Hello everyone, I'm new to this site.

Anyway, I do Xingyi, Bagua, and Yiquan as of right now. I really like all three of them, I don't think I have a favorite. I guess I just figured I would post here and sort of introduce myself a bit. I've been doing these arts for about three to four months now, and I've previously dabbled in Hapkido and Jeet Kune Do. Where I'm from, there aren't very many MA oppurtunities, besides: Aikido, Karate, Hapkido, JKD, To-ShinDo, and Tai Chi.
Okay, I guess thats more then some, but most of those dojos are too far away from me, and driving there every week would kill me gas wise, and most of them are really expensive as it is. So instead I go to this guy who lives about thirty five minutes away from me who teaches Xingyi, Bagua, and Yiquan. And so far, I like it a lot better then Hapkido or JKD.

Welcome and more Internal CMA people is always a good thing,
 
a quick question, could anyone explain to me what Liu Ba He Fa is? I've never even heard of that one before.
 
I trust this will raise some eyebrows and get the fingers clacking on the keyobard, but here goes:

I study / teach Shihando, Way of the Master. Yes, I know it is a Japanese name, but that is because one of the disciplines is the Japanese healing art known as Reiki. Shihando comprises the disciplines of Reiki and Juai Kung Karbo (Mastery through Movement), which is a martial arts system developed by Grandmaster Bert Rodriguez of Florida. This system traditionally is composed of Yang Style Tai-Chi and Shaolin Style Kung Fu forms -- all of which, while taught to most students as external forms, are in actuality internal forms of study. I went into martial arts training with Grandmaster Rodriguez as a Reiki Master, and with the intent to study internal arts. He taught me everything I could have asked for.

Studying the alchemy of these disciplines gives you no choice but to think and feel and change and grow and then take your energy and reshape it and remold it into whatever you choose to be.

Fabulous stuff, really.

Thank you.
 
I have another question about the internal arts, I tried looking it up but couldn't find anything. Are Bagua and Xingyi considered northern, or southern styles?
 
Unsung Hero said:
I have another question about the internal arts, I tried looking it up but couldn't find anything. Are Bagua and Xingyi considered northern, or southern styles?

Technically, internal styles are ussually put in a seperate category than the northern and southern distinction. However, as they originated in the North, they would be considered nothern by that criterion.
 
I study Gao Style Ba Gua in Berkely Ca. On Monday nights and Oakland Ca on Thursdays. I eventually want to start learning Hsing-I as well. My school is part of a group called the North American Tang Shou Tao Association
 
empty cup said:
I study Gao Style Ba Gua in Berkely Ca. On Monday nights and Oakland Ca on Thursdays. I eventually want to start learning Hsing-I as well. My school is part of a group called the North American Tang Shou Tao Association

It was my understanding that there was a Xingy part to Gao style Bagua?

Check with Gaoguy.
 
Unsung Hero said:
a quick question, could anyone explain to me what Liu Ba He Fa is? I've never even heard of that one before.

Here's a video of one of the rarer forms of Liu He Ba Fa called Straight Dragon. It's incomplete.
 
HI Xue Sheng: Sorry I posted more or less the same thing twice. Any way to answer your question if by Hsing-I stuff you mean linear forms , yes we do have them. If I remember right ( I am still learning this stuff) there are sixty four of them. They are commonly referred to as Post Heaven Palms. The ready position we start from is basically a Hsing-I San Ti stance.
 
empty cup said:
HI Xue Sheng: Sorry I posted more or less the same thing twice. Any way to answer your question if by Hsing-I stuff you mean linear forms , yes we do have them. If I remember right ( I am still learning this stuff) there are sixty four of them. They are commonly referred to as Post Heaven Palms. The ready position we start from is basically a Hsing-I San Ti stance.

Cool thanks, I only trained bagua briefly and I have no idea of what style it was to be honest, I am guessing probably mixed. I have trained Xingyi, 5-element and 5-element cascade and only briefly touched in the animal forms.

Do they make you stand in San Ti?
 
Xue Sheng said:
Cool thanks, I only trained bagua briefly and I have no idea of what style it was to be honest, I am guessing probably mixed. I have trained Xingyi, 5-element and 5-element cascade and only briefly touched in the animal forms.

Do they make you stand in San Ti?


Actually at our school for the Ba Gua we don't practice standing in San Ti. San Ti is pretty much either a ready stance for linear forms or a transitional stance for circular forms. Where the Hsing-I class may practice holding San Ti before doing their forms we walk the circle for a while holding a series of eight different postures before we start our forms practice.
 
empty cup said:
Actually at our school for the Ba Gua we don't practice standing in San Ti. San Ti is pretty much either a ready stance for linear forms or a transitional stance for circular forms. Where the Hsing-I class may practice holding San Ti before doing their forms we walk the circle for a while holding a series of eight different postures before we start our forms practice.

Cool, that is similar to what I use to do in Yang Style and what I am doing in Chen, hold a series of postures. And in Xingyi you are right we held San Ti and only San Ti.

Thanks
 

Latest Discussions

Back
Top